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Comment Re:Don't blame the publishers ... (Score 1) 6

I will admit I do not have military experience, so I cannot back this up for all cases. My understanding though is that any time a service member chooses to disobey an order from a superior they are in very real risk of being charged with (at least) insubordination. In some cases they could lose their rank. pension, or more.

Comment Re: "Of course it can," says government (Score 1) 133

The comment I was responding to was regarding HAARP. And that's "except" FYI. :-) ECC is actually more reliable, for its problem domain, than a triple voting system. The probability that you would arrive at a valid ECC code for bad data due to multiple bit flips is much lower than than the probability of two out of three systems voting wrong. So, it is at least theoretically possible to design a computer system with data integrity throughout that exceeds that of a voting system.

Comment Re:"Of course it can," says government (Score 1) 133

Faraday cages are really good for RF, and I was writing about HAARP. The X rays that you get from a radiologist don't have the same energy level as cosmic rays. The best we can do about energetic cosmic rays is to make our equipment less susceptible, because you can never have enough shielding.

Comment ECC (Score 5, Insightful) 133

This is why ECC is used to protect memory and data busses. At least on the good stuff :-) . One of the issues is die shrink. As the minimum detail slze of the IC process gets smaller, the potential for radiation to flip a bit gets higher.

Silicon-on-sapphire is the main way to implement silicon-on-insulator, which is more protective of radiation bit flips and less likely to latch-up. But since these have historically been required only for space satellites, they have been horribly expensive. Imagine running an entire IC fabrication just to make a few chips. As there are more applications for rad-hard chips, the price could fall.

Comment Re:Missing theory (Score 1) 53

A view Russian probes got lost while flying over HAARP, I think Phobos Grunt was the most recent one. The theory is that their electronics was grilled by these high-power transmitters. This one actually makes sense though.

This was obfuscation on the part of the Russians. According to the failure report issued by Roscosmos there were other reasons, including use of non-space-qualified components that were susceptible to radiation damage, and insufficient ground testing.

Comment Re:2020 campaign? (Score 1) 7

WTF is wrong with that sorry excuse for a man?

The shorter list is what isn't wrong. Indeed that list is so short that aside from "breathes in oxygen" I can't think of anything to put on it.

In that press conference a few days ago he mentioned Hillary Clinton sixteen times.

He - or his handlers - is smart enough to know a dog whistle when he hears one. Nothing excites the GOP base as much as the name "Clinton". He could mention Chelsea Clinton's child - or for that matter mention NY Governor Clinton (who was responsible for the Erie Canal) - and the GOP would promptly circle jerk themselves into a frothy frenzy. If a little bit is good, then obviously even more is even more gooder, right?

Comment Re:Prior art (Score 2) 70

I'm sure others here can come up with other examples?

Probably, but it doesn't matter... there's already enough well-known prior art out there that this guy is well into "kook" territory. More evidence that he's a kook isn't going to change his opinion. A court slapdown might, although I suspect they'll drop the case before it gets to that point.

Comment Too bad it's Ubuntu (Score 2) 118

This distro seems to become a bigger train wreck with each passing release. The arbitrary bullshit that my current install (16.04LTS) keeps throwing at me boggles my mind at times. Who the fuck thought it made sense for a laptop to lock the display configuration files when it goes to sleep? Now any time I put my laptop to sleep I have to move .config, and .kde, and reboot the next time I want to connect to an external monitor. Otherwise it will happily detect and lock out any external monitor until the magic locked file is out of the way. A simple reboot doesn't resolve it, the files have to be moved manually out of the way.

I wish that was the worst thing they've done, that is just the problem I run it to most often. The long term solution to it seems to be to just never put my laptop to sleep (as I use a different external display configuration at home than I do at work, and there are times I need to use only the laptop display while at work or on the road).

Comment Smartphone life expectancy? (Score 2) 90

If 432 million smart phones are sold per quarter that is 1.6 billion per year. One group predicts around 4.77 billion cell phone users by the end of 2017, though that includes both smart phones and less sophisticated phones. If we said that half of those phones are smart that means the number of smart phones is somewhere around 2.4 billion. We already know we are closing in on saturation as the remainder of the world's ~6.8 billion people are not necessarily potential customers for cell service.

So if 1.6 billion of the 2.4 billion smart phones in use today were purchased in the past year, does that suggest that on average over half the world's smart phones last under a year?

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