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Comment Re:Since they determined autopilot wasn't to blame (Score 1) 185

The smart ones already had great driving records. It is the stupid ones you are protecting with this technology.

Being smart doesn't protect you from stupid people's actions -- you can be a perfect driver and still get rear-ended by someone who never saw you slow down because they were texting.

This technology protects stupid people and the smart people who have to share the roads with them.

Comment Re:Since they determined autopilot wasn't to blame (Score 1) 185

For a small fraction of what is spent on personal vehicle ownership, we could have pretty amazing public transportation that would satisfy the needs of nearly every city & suburb dweller. And that would naturally lead to fewer serious accidents.

Also for a small fraction of what is spent on fast food, people could buy and cook healthy vegetarian meals for themselves, that would satisfy the nutritional needs of nearly every citizen. And that would naturally lead to fewer cases of heart disease and obesity.

Unfortunately, what people want is not always the same as what would theoretically work the best. In this case, most people want private cars, and they have made that preference clear through both their spending and their voting patterns. Barring the advent of some kind of benign dictatorship, a transition to all-public-transit won't happen anytime soon.

Comment Re:Intelligent design (Score 0) 166

These researchers may be trying to apply the wrong methods to a device that is almost certainly the product of a higher power.

That may well be the case, but if so, it's also quite clear that the higher power used evolution and natural selection as his development tool.

If human brains had just been magic'd into existence by divine fiat, there would be no reason for them to look like a specialized version of the brains of earlier hominids (which in turn look like specialized versions of the brains of earlier mammals, and so on for as far back as you care to look).

Comment Re:Wow (Score 1) 183

wouldn't shit the bed when they tried to parse a URI like moz://a in a chunk of text.

If an application blows up when it encounters :// in free-form text, I have no sympathy and neither should Mozilla. Too many things try to be cute with minimal and poorly-defined markup these days and any pushback is welcome.

Comment Re:... move to a shared, distributed database ... (Score 2) 109

unless, of course, you manage to get a majority of the people to record it incorrectly... but gee, that's impossible, right?

Nothing's impossible. However, the relevant question would be, is it harder to subvert a blockchain-based system (where you need subvert "a majority of the people") than the current system (where you need to subvert only one person, as long as it is the right person)?

Comment Re:No headphone jack ... (Score 4, Insightful) 205

Must be a shitty ploy, my brand new HTC bolt came with wired headphones.

Pushing more expensive headphones might be a bonus short-term side effect, but the real victory here is the potential of closing the analog hole for mobile devices. I fully expect someone to introduce "end to end" DRM within a year or two which will require an authenticated and encrypted connection from the source (file or stream) through the mobile processor, to the headphones. Non-compliant headphones won't be able to authenticate with the host device and therefore won't be usable with certain DRM'd media.

Don't be surprised when Apple shows more "courage" and removes the analog audio connectors from their next lineup of desktops and laptops (if they haven't already). The desktop / laptop market will swiftly follow once people accept it on mobile.

Take a look at HDCP for an example of how this has already been done elsewhere.

Comment A future countermeasure for "active shooters"? (Score 2) 113

It seems like a co-ordinated swarm of drones would be a good way to neutralize someone who has decided to go on a shooting spree. They could either attack the shooter or simply swarm around him so that he can't see where he is going, and shooting at them wouldn't be particularly effective since they are small, fast, and there are so many of them.

Well, someday, maybe.

Comment Re: Unlimited? (Score 2) 196

What the hell does net neutrality have to do with the data limits on cellphone plans?

Moving away from unlimited and into more expensive and limited plans pushes people towards provider-sanctioned services for which the bandwidth does not count towards your monthly usage. This goes against network neutrality, even if the topic is bandwidth usage instead of transfer speed.

What the hell does Trump's winning the US Presidential election have to do with cellphone data plans?

Trump is an opponent of net neutrality.

Comment Re:Who cares? (Score 1) 238

Not to mention obscene contrast ratios (which is implied by your post, I guess) -- some claim 1,000,000:1, others seem to claim infinite.

Contrast ratios get silly and mostly pointless when you have a black that is fully non-emissive. It's the same as dividing by zero -- hence the claim for an infinite ratio.

With OLED panels, the important metrics will be brightness and color gamut.

Comment Re:What do you want to be ? (Score 1) 104

One use case, imagine I'm a US company and I ship worldwide. A customer wants to buy $5000 of product. I ship the product. They contact their credit card company and say it was a fraudulent charge and they issue a chargeback. My company is out of $5000 and there is not much recourse

If I'm not mistaken, the flip side of this is if you take the customer's Bitcoins and decide not to ship their product. What recourse would your customer have then?

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