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Comment Re:Coal is a campaign punchline (Score 1) 478

That's possible, but I think it's unlikely. If Trump were to regulate wind and solar into oblivion, local energy prices would go up and the power companies would simply import power from Canada and Mexico where wind and solar would still be legal and still be cheaper. They'll buy whatever energy is the cheapest. If that's not domestic power then so be it. Money will cast the final vote.

Sadly we don't have the same freedom of choice with internet yet.

Comment gay couples (Score 1) 188

I have no doubt that in countries where abortion is legal, right-to-lifers will be lining up to crowd-fund this research, and to pay for women who would otherwise have an abortion to pop their fetuses into these artificial wombs and brought to term.

And then, of course, they will act boldly to ensure that the fetuses are adopted into loving families...perhaps even their own!

Yeah, right.

OTH, the same people will lose their shit when they realize gay and lesbian couples will be able to have their own babies in a buy-an-egg-or-sperm kind of a thing. This will fundamentally change the nature of reproduction (and thus marriage). And then the Anti-Christ will come or something. Oh, I can see the shows in the 700 Club.

Comment Re:Cry me a river (Score 1) 286

There's also a magnitude of difference between a toxic work environment and "I go home exhausted, work frequently out of town. Work long hours for no extra money." as the original poster put it. I've done the latter and even enjoyed it but I've also stuck a toxic work environment for years past the point I should have left and ended up suffering from serious stress and depression (not sleeping, panic attacks if my phone rang out of hours, depressed on a Saturday night because I can sense Monday approaching). You can also feel that its your own fault, particularly if others seem to cope and especially if there's bullying involved.

I can't really judge this case from a short summary, but people poo-pooing the idea have just never experienced it.

^^^. I've been through both also, long hours for the money and/or toxic environments, only one, though. The later one was bad enough to make me depressed for a while. If you live long enough and aren't the type that stays at one job forever, you are bound to experience it all.

Comment Coal is a campaign punchline (Score 4, Insightful) 478

Coal isn't coming back. It's something that sounded good to Trump's fans on the campaign trail, that's all. The coal industry employs fewer people than freaking Arby's. Fixing the coal industry would be like using a teaspoon to bail out a sinking Titanic. Middle America has far bigger problems that the dwindling coal industry.

Only reason why it's an issue at all is because it sounded good on the campaign trail for Trump's supporters. It's dog whistle politics, not an actual energy plan. To everyone else it sounds like Trump is saying "Coal is the future and will meet our energy needs cheaply and effectively!" Which it absolutely won't. But to his fans, it sounds like this: "Rust belt and former mining communities will get their jobs back and be prosperous again!" Sadly, it doesn't actually mean that either. Deregulate all you want, wind and solar are still going to be cheaper.

I feel bad for those folks in coal country counting on this guy to fix things for them. He isn't going to. He isn't able to. It'll be pretty bitter when they realize that.

Comment Re: Cry me a river (Score 1) 286

I get the feeling you are young and still are surrounded by your friends from school. Once everyone pairs up, moves to jobs farther away and can't get together all the time like they used to, where do your friends come from? At a point in my life, not so long ago, most of my friends came into my life through work. Same age, same interests, same general goals.

Nope, not even close.

In in the way above 40 yrs old set.

I have college friends in New Orleans that I reconnected with, but I also stay in regular touch with friends from the states I did live throughout my life and schooling.

I tend to meet people as neighbors and through them. And in NOLA, there is the concept of the neighborhood bar. I tend to meet many friends, neighbors and women there.

I don't do social media, but I have plenty of friends in meatspace locally as well as visitors or my travelling about to see them.

Once you "pair up", that doesn't mean you have to give up your friends of your youth. I'm still in regular touch with my oldest friend I met when I was 11 and he was 12yrs. A lot of my friends close are 15-20years friends and we still regularly hang out.

I am quite nice and cordial to co-workers, but I never get close to them. Unless they are in my immediate group I don't even really notice them as that I am busy at work.

I'd never stay with a woman that made me get rid of my friends...after all, I've known and respected them for MUCH LONGER than I've been fucking her....you know?

And you are above 40? Wow.

Comment Re:Mayer's failure actually WASN'T a failure... (Score 1, Interesting) 156

what did *SHE DO* exactly that was positive? because as you said, most of that 'growth' was directly due to alibaba.

She resisted calls to sell Alibaba, she resisted calls to strip Yahoo down to the bones. Shareholders were screaming to short-sell Yahoo down to a carcass. She did not and allowed the company to generate a very decent annual growth rate.

Maybe she could have done better. Maybe someone could have done better. Would have blah blah hand waving. In there here and now, she kept Yahoo from crumbling long enough to allow a sale. She retained capital and value.

What more can you possibly (and reasonably) as for a beached whale such as Yahoo? By all rights it should have ended like Boo.com or Webvan.

Comment Re:Fear (Score 1) 198

You should expect a turnover every 4-5 years and plan accordingly.

Before the Great Recession, I used to switch jobs every three years, sometimes at the same company or a different company. After the Great Recession, I worked whatever contracting job I could land. A contract can last anywhere from four hours, days, weeks, months or years. I'm currently halfway through a five-year contract in government IT.

To me, cycling through short-term contracts is not turnover. That's just being part of being a contractor (I've done more contract jobs than permanent ones.) And you adjust to it. But when we land a long-term contracting job or a permanent gig, the clock begins ticking. And once it goes past the 4-year mark, it is time to have backup plans before the churn hits again.

Comment Re:Fear (Score 1) 198

Not everyone in this industry is competent enough to get another job with the same pay grade/benefits as the one they currently hold.

Oh I know that type of experience. My salary has gone up then down (sometimes significantly) and then up again, with bouts unemployment in between. But in software, that's reality. If anyone wants to have a career in it, he/she has to grapple with that reality, accept it, roll with it and plan for it.

I don't think there is anything out there anymore than can provide a years-long guarantee of employment. But people hold on to that fallacy, expecting salaries to always go up or remain the same. And that's an absurdity that makes people commit absurd things (like hacking an employer or not having a plan A, B, C and D in hand when shit hits the fan at the current job... which it will.)

Comment Re:It has its uses (Score 1) 417

I see lambdas as the opposite end of the pendulum swing from the goto statement.

They have their place but they both lead to lots of confusion with poor coders who are trying to maintain very old code.

That's not a function of lambdas, or gotos for that matter. I've seen elegant, clear solutions using gotos that made code simpler to read. Same with lambdas. As a matter of fact, same with everything in a programming tool set.

It's not what you use to write code, but how you write code, how you compose it. That's what makes code maintainable, not the lack or usage of some feature.

Comment Fear (Score 3, Interesting) 198

Wall Street IT Engineer Hacks Employer To See If He'll Be Fired

What is it with people in this industry who fear getting laid off (or fired, which is distinct)? You should expect a turnover every 4-5 years and plan accordingly. Unless you live in the middle of nowhere where employers are scarce (NYC certainly does not fit that label), all you need to do is brush up your skills, be proactive and cultivate a professional network to survive turn-overs.

If you are passive and lackadaisical with your career, however, I can see why you'd shit bricks every so often enough to think hacking your employer this way is a good idea :/

Comment BASIC (Score 1) 630

My first language, followed by Turbo Pascal, both still close to my heart even though after 25 years I've moved to Java/C++/C#/Python. Matter of fact, I did some part-time work developing VB and Turbo Pascal/Delphi applications while in college. That certainly helped me through college (another reason why I don't jump on the BASIC or Pascal hate bandwagons.)

Comment Re:Its pretty important... (Score 1) 307

It's a shame more people don't realize this, as evidenced by the multiple posts on here suggesting that people need to relocate. I've lived all over the country, but I've spent the majority of my life here in Louisiana and I'd like to stay here.

The majority of the folks affected by this live in areas such as Plaquemines, Terrebone, and Lafourche parishes aren't rich by any means. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... They were born here; to suggest that they just pack up and move is pretty short-sighted and somewhat insulting.

The notion that people must be immune to relocation just because they "were born there" is an insult to human nature. Conditions change, Things go south, .Shit happens. People relocate, never to return. It's what humans do. It's what humans are meant to do.

Comment Re:As opposed to Amazon Prime? (Score 1) 81

How is SQS, RDS, S3, etc from the AWS stack not a lock-in? They're proprietary API's that are specific to a single vendor. Choosing to not use them significantly dilutes the value proposition of moving to AWS in the first place. There's a lot of people that can do "servers in the cloud", what differentiates AWS is the software and services they provide on top of that.

I like the AWS stack, don't get me wrong, but the lock-in is pretty much there from day one.

SQS and RDS, do you really need to use them? What stops you from using your own RabbitMQ and MySQL instances (or the many other alternatives) on AWS? And if you use a robust abstraction layer (say, Spring Messaging, Spring Data, Hibernate, myBatis, Python SQLAlchemy or whatever that applies to your platform), the distinction becomes irrelevant.

This is unlike a lock-in with, say, Oracle IDM for identity management or TSD for time series data, or when you adopt a WebLogic extension to work around a JEE limitation (instead of writing your own workaround.) This is far more pervasive and hard to walk away from once you go down that path (I know, I see it around me.) These lock-ins are incredibly hard, if not impossible to insulate yourself with abstraction layers. So SQS and RDS are not pervasive lock-ins built around a substantial need, but as conveniences you can walk away or wrap around with an abstraction layer.

S3, it is so damned ubiquitous and oh so incredibly useful and resilient that it doesn't make sense *not* to leverage it. Additionally, the lock in is the URI. The mechanism to access it is via REST, so what is there to stop you from accessing and posting your content on your own content repository (deployed on AWS or elsewhere)? Again, the lock-in is simply not comparable to Oracle's because the lock-in is not architectural in nature.

Comment Re:As opposed to Amazon Prime? (Score 1) 81

"No longer does the process involve the purchase of heavy proprietary software with multi-year contracts that include annual maintenance fees. " I guess the two sides really don't know how each other works....

What does AWS have to do with Prime? And what type of license lock-in do they have that compares to Oracle's? You can cancel anyone at any time almost without penalty (other than forfeiting a refund if you cancel before your contract), nor do you have a pervasive multi-thousand-dollar per-core license lock-in with either, do you?

I've worked in multiple Oracle shops, so I know what that lock-in entails. With that comparison of yours, I don't you know what you are talking about?

Additionally, as long as you don't really lock yourself to a AWS-specific framework or architecture, like, say, AWS Lambda, you really have little lock in. Whether is is a JEE system or a Ruby system or whatever backed by any major data store (MySQL, Postgress, Cassandra, whatever), if you are deploying on an AWS instance, you very much can do the same with a local instance using the same OS.

OTH, and I known from experience, when you work with the Oracle stack, not just the database but also any or all products built on top of its database or WebLogic, you lock yourself in architecturally very easily. Oh shit, there you go, you are now tied to say, Oracle SOA or ADF, or IDM or with WebLogic JEE extensions.

I actually like Oracle products, and having access to their support network is awesome. But I recognize the significantly devious ways in which Oracle ties you in if you are not careful (and let's face it, most developers and architects aren't.) Ergo the lock-in.

You barely see that with AWS, or even Azure. So...

Comment Re:As opposed to Amazon Prime? (Score 1) 81

"No longer does the process involve the purchase of heavy proprietary software with multi-year contracts that include annual maintenance fees. " I guess the two sides really don't know how each other works....

What does AWS have to do with Prime? And what type of license lock-in do they have that compares to Oracle's? You can cancel anyone at any time almost without penalty (other than forfeiting a refund if you cancel before your contract), nor do you have a pervasive multi-thousand-dollar per-core license lock-in with either, do you?

I've worked in multiple Oracle shops, so I know what that lock-in entails. With that comparison of yours, I don't you know what you are talking about?

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