Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Compare cell phone plans using Wirefly's innovative plan comparison tool ×

Comment Re:Next Phase (Score 1) 420

The speed is less important than energy delivered at site of impact. [...] Fan rotors move slower, but are more massive, and have more total energy behind them. You dont need something to be sharp or fast moving to cut you in half; it just needs to exert enough energy over a small area to cause mechanical shear of your body.

Okay, let's try to stay on topic.

Getting a loop of wire from a wench wrapped around a leg and slowly slooped up will chop it off just as surely as if the wire was moving fast but at less torque.

Unless the wire catches on a bone, and the wire is thin enough to snap there. But let's fucking stay on topic. We don't need ridiculous examples designed to distract people because they contain an injury to discuss the topic at hand, you sensationalist nutter.

In fact, there are multiple factors involved in determining how much force it's going to require to break the silly string, and in how much force is being delivered. One of the factors is the force applied, one of the factors is the time in which the force is applied and how that affects the material in question, one of the factors is the quantity of material the force is being spread out across. And in spite of being a lot smaller and less massive, the tip of a quadcopter blade is going to impart a lot more energy to a much smaller section of silly string than a metal fan blade is, because the fan blade is squared off (being stamped from a piece of metal) while the tip of a rotor is very sharp, and the rotor is moving much much faster and F=MA. There's a lot more A in the quadcopter system. But wait, there's more; you only have to consider the effect of its mass until the string breaks. If the string breaks at a level of force which can be achieved with the current acceleration at lower than the actual mass, then the additional mass of the rotor is irrelevant here.

There are lots of other factors, but these are the ones that we've been talking about in this discussion already.

To be a proper experiment, it needs to be a high speed metal bladed fan, with big heavy blades. I can probably find one if I look hard enough.

Only the speed is likely to be relevant, and it will still have a dramatically lower tip velocity than a quadcopter doing anything but hovering.

Comment Re:"topic of discussion for many across the world" (Score 1) 102

Since when is CNN left?

So you mean the external renaming to 'Clinton News Network' was only because the letters matched?

So you mean the external renaming to 'Clinton News Network' was only because the letters matched?

Clinton is not a liberal. She is a neocon. Trump is not a conservative. He is just a sleazebag.

I never said she was a liberal, historically liberals believe in personal liberty... she does not. She's very much a illiberal progressive.

What? You just contradicted yourself there completely, smart guy. Care to rephrase your sentence until it makes sense? Here, this might help. Don't go alone, take one of these. Maybe then you'll have some idea what the words you're using mean.

Comment Re:Oh please (Score 1) 58

Potentially exactly his "chance" death caused it to be preserved? If it had been eaten by a predator, we would not get a complete skeleton (more likely we'd maybe find a bone or a tooth somewhere, with scavengers carrying off what's left of the carcass).

There are many examples of preservation by accident, simply because the specimen in question did something extraordinary. Think of this one for example. He traveled, presumably alone, across the alps. Something you didn't do back then, there was nothing to prove or no reason to go for some kind of misguided "self-realization", back then people had real problems and didn't feel the urge to make their life harder to "feel it". So most people weren't stupid enough to climb onto glaciers. This guy did. And that's what preserved him while everyone else from his tribe has turned to dust long ago.

So yes, the random, odd sample may well be all we can still find.

Comment Email encryption and the damn network effect (Score 1) 193

He does regularly encrypt his e-mail, "but he doesn't recommend that average users scramble their email, because he thinks the encryption software is just too difficult to use."

How on earth do you use encrypted mail unless all your recipients also do the same, i.e. have public/private keys of their own that are configured in their email clients? He probably does communicate with other security minded folk who also use encryption, but the vast majority of ordinary people neither know nor care about these things.
The biggest drawback to encrypted anything is that it requires everybody to use it. There's plenty of open source and secure alternatives to popular apps but there's no point in recommending say, Signal or Toxwhen all the people you know couldn't be bothered to get off Whatsapp.

Slashdot Top Deals

"There are some good people in it, but the orchestra as a whole is equivalent to a gang bent on destruction." -- John Cage, composer

Working...