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Comment Re:La Niña is about to bite us in the arse (Score 4, Insightful) 73

I'll bet that after hurricane Katrina, you said, "this is going to keep happening every year and we will see more and more hurricanes, it will be horrible".

I'm absolutely certain you believed that. And you would have been Very wrong.

So why is this prediction any better...?

Comment Re:MS's role? (Score 1) 76

The virus writers went elsewhere and people forgot. The CIA didn't forget.

But the 'feature' is useless if it's so easy to detect. Bet they never let it into the wide of their own secure networks, for fear of their politicians getting 'caught' and embarrassed.

Embarrassed? They don't embarrass politicians they catch. They secure funding from politicians they catch.

Comment Re:MS's role? (Score 1) 76

No? All it has to be is an external image URL.

hxxp://CIAFRONTWEBSITE .GOV/username=X&IP=Y&OSversion=Z&....

Obfuscate that enough and put it someplace that Microsoft Office auto-loads and bammo. Instant tracking, no software needed. This is Spam Email 101 tactics here.

Hell, it's the same trick they used (via a broken flash plugin) in Operation Pacifier to figure out who was connecting to the FBI's child porn server on TOR. You know, the operation that caused them to repeal the 4th Amendment for anyone using a computer that has TCP/IP installed?

Comment No problem (Score 2) 46

You can have that however you have to accept a few things:

1) Costs are going to go way up. You aren't going to pay $50 or $100 for a software package, it'll be 5 or 6 figures. You'll be paying for all the additional testing, certification, and risk.

2) You won't get new stuff. Everything you use will be old tech. You'll be 5-10 years out of date because of the additional time needed to test and prove things. When a new chip or whatever comes on the market it'll be a good bit of time before it has undergone all the validation it needs to be ready for such a critical use.

3) You will not be permitted to modify anything. You will sign a contract (a real paper one) up front that will specify what you can do with the solution, and what environment it must be run in. Every component will have to be certified, all software on the system, the system itself, any systems it connects to, etc. No changes on your part will be permitted, everything will have to be regression tested and verified before any change is made.

If you are ok with that, then off you go! The way I know this is how it goes is that we have shit like this, we have critical systems out there and this is the kind of shit they go through. They are expensive, inflexible, and out of date compared to the latest mass market shit. If you look at the computers that control a fighter plane or the like you'll be amazed at how "dated" they are. Well they are that way because development took a long time and once they are developed, they continue to be used, they aren't changed often.

Now if that's not ok, if you want the free wheeling environment we have now where you can buy new tech when you like, put things together in any configuration, and run whatever you want that's cool, but accept that means problems will happen. You cannot have it both ways.

Oh and also with that critical stuff:

4) There will be no FOSS. If there's liability for losses, nobody will be willing to freely distribute their work. They aren't going to accept liability for no payment, and aren't going to accept that if their code was used by someone else they might be liable.

Comment They are also often newer (Score 1) 166

That is another huge determining factor. The big cost is laying the infrastructure. The kind doesn't matter so much. So, if you are doing new deployments, fiber is more likely. The cable company here is all FTTH all the time for new build outs. However once that shit is deployed a replacement is a lot of money that you'd rather not spend. So they are less inclined to do it.

Well new developments also tend to not be low income. Usually middle and upper class is what they target. No surprise then that is where you see more of it.

There are plenty of rich neighbourhoods where I live with no fibre. The one right next to me is a good example. About 2 blocks away, and they have the same cable and DSL offerings I do in my cheap condo. Neither the telco nor cable company feels there's enough money to be made in ripping up and redoing the lines in either place, despite the fact that those houses are almost all 7 figures.

Go out in to a new subdivision though, and it is usually FTTH.

Also when they do rip things up and replace, of course they target the rich places since those people are more willing to spend the money. Offer someone low income the option of $100/month gigabit or $20/month 1.5mbit and they will likely go with the 1/5mbit. Ya it is way more per bit and annoyingly slow on the modern Internet, but it gets the job done and $80/month is a lot in the budget of someone low income.

Comment Re:Mayer's failure actually WASN'T a failure... (Score 2) 156

If you look at revenues, they're sideways over the past years. So OK, she didn't turn the company around. But she took a has-been company with little really going for it and... well, kept it from going bankrupt. Given that the market cap is currently $50 billion, I think $186 million is not excessive for keeping a sinking ship afloat. Hell, who could have done it? Sure, Jobs did an amazing job turning around Apple when he came back, but it had a strong niche in OS and hardware design, and Yahoo never really had anything like that once they passed their peak. And while I'm not some sort of hard-core feminist, I think there's a bit of hypocrisy that she's taking flak for making money off mediocre performance running a mediocre, has-been company. Any number of male CEOs have had been highly compensated for driving good companies into the ground, to the point that it's hardly even news. It's just sort of expected.

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