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Submission + - SPAM: Internet of Things: A hacker's dream come true?

Orome1 writes: The Internet of Things is a massive expansion in technology and systems, with little oversight, no real rules, and rolled out in many cases by companies with little or no history is cybersecurity. In the near future, the IoT will consist of billions of devices existing in every nook and cranny of our public, work, and private lives, constantly on, and yet without anything in the way of legislative or industry mandates to keep it safe and secure. Most “things” will likely operate safely and securely without interference, but there will be some portion of the IoT that will attract the attention of the very same people and organizations who build botnets, steal IP, and carry out pay-for-DDOS attacks using the far less extensive internet we see now. If there is an IoT, a “dark IoT” will follow as inevitably as dusk follows dawn.
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Cloud

Oracle To Buy Cloud-Software Provider NetSuite For $9.3 Billion (bloomberg.com) 32

Oracle announced Thursday that it has agreed to buy NetSuite for $9.3 billion, in a move to bolster its cloud-computing offerings as it races to catch up to rivals. Both companies provide applications for running a business called enterprise-resource-planning software. Bloomberg reports: Oracle, which sells software to big corporations, has been trying to shift more sales to cloud-based products increasingly demanded by its customers. New cloud services made up about 8 percent of the company's total sales during its fiscal fourth-quarter. Buying NetSuite -- whose products include customer relationship management software -- will help Oracle compete against the likes of Salesforce.com Inc. and Microsoft Corp. "Oracle and NetSuite cloud applications are complementary, and will coexist in the marketplace forever," said Oracle co-Chief Executive Officer Mark Hurd in a statement Thursday. "We intend to invest heavily in both products -- engineering and distribution."

Submission + - SPAM: Investigating The Supply On 17 Underground Hacker Markets

Orome1 writes: Did you ever wonder what kind of malicious offerings can be found on dark web “hacker markets,” who sells them and how widely they are available? Three researchers from Arizona State University have wondered as well, and have scraped 17 such markets for six months for information about the tools and services offered, to create a general picture of the supply and demand in this particular industry. A combination of automated (scraping and data clustering) and manual (labeling) labor that concentrated on the product title/name for indication about its capabilities and features has revealed that many items are cross-posted and nearly identical. All in all, they found a total of 16122 products sold by 1332 vendors.
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Submission + - SPAM: Cybersecurity Talent Crisis Continues, Technical Skills In High Demand

Orome1 writes: In 2015, 209,000 cybersecurity jobs went unfilled in the United States alone. Despite 1 in 4 respondents to a new Intel Security survey confirming their organizations have lost proprietary data as a result of their cybersecurity skills gap, there are no signs of this workforce shortage abating in the near-term. An average of 15 percent of cybersecurity positions in companies will go unfilled by 2020. The demand for cybersecurity professionals is outpacing the supply of qualified workers, with highly technical skills the most in need across all countries surveyed. In fact, skills such as intrusion detection, secure software development and attack mitigation were found to be far more valued than softer skills including collaboration, leadership and effective communication.
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Submission + - Getty Sued For $1 Billion For Selling Publicly Donated Photos

An anonymous reader writes: Online stock media library Getty Images is facing a $1 billion lawsuit from an American photographer for illegally selling copyright for thousands of photos. The Seattle-based company has been sued by documentary photographer Carol Highsmith for ‘gross misuse’, after it sold more than 18,000 of her photos despite having already donated them for public use. Highsmith’s photos which were sold via Getty Images had been available for free via the Library of Congress. Getty has now been accused of selling unauthorised licenses of the images, not crediting the author, and for also sending threatening warnings and fines to those who had used the pictures without paying for the falsely imposed copyright.

Submission + - SPAM: Obama Defines How The US Government Will Respond To Cyber Incidents

Orome1 writes: US president Barack Obama approved on Tuesday the Presidential Policy Directive on United States Cyber Incident Coordination (PPD-41). The PPD-41 is especially geared towards defining the Federal government’s response to “significant” cyber incidents, i.e. incidents that can “result in demonstrable harm to the national security interests, foreign relations, or economy of the United States or to the public confidence, civil liberties, or public health and safety of the American people.”
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Submission + - SPAM: LastPass Zero-Day Can Lead To Account Compromise

Orome1 writes: A zero-day flaw in the popular password manager LastPass can be triggered by users visiting a malicious site, allowing attackers to compromise the users’s account and all the sensitive information in it. The discovery was made by Google Project Zero researcher Tavis Ormandy who, after probing a slew of AV solutions and finding serious security holes in them, has apparently set his sights on widely used password management solutions. Aside from that flaw, he also found “a bunch of obvious critical problems,” but responsibly chose not share publicly any more details about any of the flaws until the developers have a chance to fix them.
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Security

Pop Star Tells Fans To Send Their Twitter Passwords, But It Might Be Illegal (arstechnica.com) 115

Cyrus Farivar, reporting for Ars Technica: As a new way to connect with his fans, Jack Johnson -- one half of the pop-rap duo Jack & Jack, not to be confused with the laid back Hawaiian singer-songwriter of the same name -- has spent the last month soliciting social media passwords. Using the hashtag #HackedByJohnson, the performer has tweeted at his fans to send him their passwords. (Why he didn't go for the shorter and catchier #JackHack, we'll never know.) Then, Johnson posts under his fans' Twitter accounts, leaving a short personalized message, as them. While Johnson and his fans likely find this password sharing silly and innocuous, legal experts say that Jack Johnson, 20, may be opening himself up to civil or criminal liability under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, a notorious anti-hacking statute that dates back to the 1980s. "While the entertainer in question likely considers this password collection to be a harmless personalized promotional activity, there may indeed be legal implication of both the fans' and the entertainer's conduct," Andrea Matwyshyn, a law professor at Northeastern University, told Ars.
Earth

54C Recorded In Kuwait Likely Hottest On Record In Asia (foxnews.com) 353

An anonymous reader writes from an Associated Press report: The UN weather agency said it suspects that the 54C temperature recorded in Kuwait has set a record for the eastern hemisphere. The World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) said Tuesday it is setting up a committee to look into whether the temperature recorded last Thursday in Mitrabah, Kuwait, was a new high for the eastern hemisphere and in Asia. WMO's Omar Baddour said it is "likely" to be an eastern hemisphere record. Last week, swathes of the Middle East and North Africa and were hit by heatwaves that have become more frequent over the last half-century, and Earth is fresh off the hottest six months on record. WMO says the world record high of 56.7C was recorded at Furnace Creek in Death Valley, California, in 1913. In the UAE, highs of 49C are expected inland on Wednesday. Last year, the mercury rose above 50C in Sweiham, near Al Ain.An article on Citylab, citing NOAA's latest analysis notes that it was the warmest June in the modern history and also the 14th consecutive month of unprecedented hotness.
Movies

Slashdot Asks: What's Next For Netflix? (500ish.com) 192

What does the future hold for Netflix? The company first earned a name for itself over a decade ago renting DVDs via mails in an era when Blockbuster used to laugh at the mere idea of DVDs-by-mail. It then moved to offering online streaming service way before most of the companies. As VC and former journalist MG Siegler writes, Netflix was always ahead of the curve. But the market -- and the demand from the market is changing, again. To address that, the on-demand streaming service has over the past three-four years started to invest heavily in getting exclusive rights for movies and TV shows, as well as make its own original content. But this time, Netflix is facing immense competition from its rivals -- and its moves aren't that unpredictable. It's also worth pointing out just recently, the company's decision to hike prices led its stocks to tank. Siegler writes: The streaming content game is now hyper competitive. And even the streaming original content game has gotten extremely competitive. And this means it has gotten extremely expensive. The result has been great for us, the users, as we do seem to be in a golden age of television-like content, even if it's being delivered via streaming "channels" like Netflix. With 54 Emmy nominations this year, second to only HBO, Netflix is seemingly closing in on what they set out to do once again. They've become HBO faster than HBO has been able to become Netflix. Of course, HBO still has the warm blanket of cable operator fees to keep them cozy; Netflix's model has them a bit out in the cold in that regard. So, again, what's next? Is it VR? Something else? Don't tell me it's 4k. Worldwide expansion is huge, but that's really just growing into the last business. What's the next business pivot?What you, Slashdot readers, think Netflix's next move will be? Or do you think the company will soon become just another name in its respective category?

Submission + - SPAM: Low-Cost Wireless Keyboards Open To Keystroke Sniffing And Injection Attacks

Orome1 writes: Bastille Networks researcher Marc Newlin has discovered a set of security vulnerabilities in low-cost wireless keyboards that could be exploited to collect all passwords, security questions, sensitive personal, bank account and payment card info users input through them. The problem with the vulnerable keyboards is that they don’t encrypt the keystroke data before they transmit it wirelessly to the USB dongle, and that’s because their manufacturers opted to use unencrypted radio communication protocols. The transceivers used in the vulnerable keyboards do not support firmware updates, so they will remain vulnerable forever.
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AMD

AMD Unveils Radeon Pro WX and Pro SSG Professional Graphics Cards (hothardware.com) 53

MojoKid writes: AMD took the wraps off its latest pro graphics solutions at SIGGRAPH today, and announced three new professional graphics cards in the new Polaris-based Radeon Pro WX Series. The Radeon Pro WX 4100 is the entry-level model with a half-height design for use in small form-factor workstations. The Radeon Pro WX 5100 is the middle child, while the Radeon Pro WX 7100 is AMD's current top-end WX model. The Radeon Pro WX 7100 has 32 compute units, offers 5 TFLOPs of compute performance, and is backed by 8GB of GDDR4 memory over a 256-bit memory interface. The Radeon Pro WX 5100 offers 28 compute units and 4 TFLOPs of performance along with 8GB memory over the same 256-bit interface, and the Radeon Pro WX 4100 is comprised of 16 compute units at 2 TFLOPs of perf with 4GB memory over a 128-bit memory link. The Radeon Pro WX 4100 has four mini DisplayPort outputs, while the Radeon Pro WX 5100 and 7100 each have four full-size DisplayPort connectors. None of these cards will be giving the new NVIDIA Quadro P6000 a run for its money in terms of performance, but they don't have to. The Quadro card will no doubt cost thousands of dollars, while the Radeon Pro WX 7100 will eek in at just under $1,000. The Radeon Pro WX 5100 and 4100 will slot in somewhat below that mark. AMD also announced the Radeon Solid State Storage Architecture and the Radeon Pro SSG card today. Details are scant, but AMD is essentially outfitting Radeon Pro SSG cards with large amounts of Solid State Flash Memory, which can allow much larger data sets to reside close to the GPU in an extended frame buffer. Whereas the highest-end professional graphics cards today may have up to 24GB of memory, the Radeon Pro SSG will start with 1TB, linked to the GPU via a custom PCI Express interface. Giving the GPU access to a large, local data repository should offer significantly increased performance for demanding workloads like real-time post-production of 8K video, high-resolution rendering, VR content creation and others.

Submission + - What Does Yahoo's Downfall Teach Us? (chrisshort.net)

oaf357 writes: What does Yahoo's downfall teach us? That you must bring together a great team. The assembled players have to push people to build great features (the content will come, as exemplified by Medium, Snapchat, Facebook, etc.). That team must also do its due diligence in an effort to add value to the company. Now we all get to see how Verizon will deal with Yahoo assuming that deal gets approved, of course.

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