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Submission + - Globalization Considered Harmful

theodp writes: In the wake of Brexit, the NY Times reported earlier this month that President Obama will need his oratory powers to sell globalization. Asked to explain his strategy to reverse growing sentiment over globalization, President Obama responded, "The question is not whether or not there's going to be an international global economy. There is one." Still, the President acknowledged, "Ordinary people who have concerns about trade have a legitimate gripe about globalization, because the fact is that as the global economy is integrated, what we've seen are trend lines across the advanced economies of growing inequality and stagnant wages, and a smaller and smaller share of overall productivity and growth going to workers, and a larger portion going to the top 1 percent. And that's a real problem. Because if that continues, the social cohesion and political consensus needed for liberal market economies starts breaking down." The disconnect between theory and reality is at the heart of Ross Hartshorn's Globalization Considered Harmful. "There is a word for people who are opposed to the globalized economy, and it isn't 'xenophobe' or 'racist'," he writes. "It's 'protectionist'. For some time now, it's been thrown around as an insult, as if there were something wrong with protecting people. There was a similar trick played in the U.S. with the word 'liberal', where conservatives used it as an insult long enough that candidates on the left started to avoid describing themselves as liberal. But there is nothing wrong with protecting people, and there is everything wrong with globalization. Globalization isn't about respecting other people's culture, or treating everyone fairly regardless of their race. Globalization is about each country specializing in just one part of a normal, healthy, diverse economy, and then treating anyone whose talents aren't suited to that part of the economy, as if they were defective and in need a handout rather than a job. I think it is time for people who don't like what globalization has done, to start using the word 'protectionist' to describe themselves. I am a protectionist; I think there is nothing wrong with protecting people. The backlash against globalization isn't the problem. Globalization is the problem."

Submission + - Should software engineers be certified? 2

mikeatTB writes: While the software engineering community does not have a formal regulatory body, there is the British Computer Society, the Association for Computing Machinery, and the IEEE Computer Society. But these are not governmental organizations. We interact with digital services daily and freely divulge information to people and organizations about which we know very little, and we have no idea what they will do with that data. And legitimate websites and services can fall short of diligently protecting the data; we’ve all heard of WikiLeaks and the Panama Papers. Can we trust the people who design, operate, and maintain access to these systems? Do we need formal regulation in the software industry? Malcolm Isaacs sat down with HPE Software's Robert Youngjohns to discuss the issue. Youngjohns says we should trust but verify — by employ cutting-edge monitoring and analytics technology to protect the organization and the data. Should we go further?

Submission + - What pranks have you pulled on scam callers? 1

flatulus writes: My wife has been getting calls repeatedly from "the Windows IT department" about our computer. She tells them she's not biting and hangs up.

This morning I had the pleasure of answering the call. It went like this:

"Hello?"
"Hi, this is the Windows IT department calling about your computer."
"A computer? what's that?"
"I'm calling about your computer."
"Computer? I've never heard of this. What is a computer?"
"What is a computer? OK, buddy — get lost" (hangup)

So, what fun stories do you have about pranking scammers?
Science

Submission + - Underwater Spider Spins Itself an Aqualung (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: In the ponds of northern Europe lives a tiny brown spider with a bubble on its back. The 10-millimeter-long Argyroneta aquatica is the only spider in the world that spends its entire life underwater. But just like land spiders, it needs oxygen to breathe. So every so often, it leaves its underwater web home to visit the surface and brings back a bubble of air that sticks to its hairy abdomen. It deposits the bubble into a little silk air tank spun for the purpose. This "diving bell," researchers have now found, is not just a repository. It's actually a gill that sucks oxygen from the water, allowing the spider to stay under for up to 24 hours.
Microsoft

Submission + - Is Bill Gates the Cure for What Ails Microsoft?

theodp writes: After reading the soon-to-be classic children's story Steve Ballmer and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Week, gdgt's Ryan Block concludes that it's time for Bill Gates to come back to Microsoft. 'I've long seen it as a foregone conclusion that Ballmer isn't the guy to be running what was until quite recently the world's preeminent technology company,' writes Block. 'The more pressing question is: who should replace him? I think we all know damn well who — but I'm not so sure he's available. Yet.' Block adds: 'I'm not saying Bill's going to leave his new gig as the world's greatest living philanthropist with aplomb, but the multi-billion dollar wheels at The Gates Foundation have been set in motion — and lest we all forget, the Foundation's endowment is tied directly to Microsoft's long-term success. It may just happen that Bill can help the Foundation more by securing Microsoft's future.'
Earth

Submission + - CO2 emissions reach a record high in 2010 (iea.org)

Nrrqshrr writes: "Energy-related carbon-dioxide (CO2) emissions in 2010 were the highest in history, [...]. In addition, the IEA
has estimated that 80% of projected emissions from the power sector in 2020 are already locked in."

"The IEA’s 2010 World Energy Outlook set out the 450 Scenario, an energy pathway consistent with achieving this goal, based on the emissions targets countries have agreed to reach by 2020. [...] global energy-related emissions in 2020 must not be greater than 32 Gt.This means that over the next ten years, emissions must rise less in total than they did between 2009 and 2010."

Canada

Submission + - Canadian Scientists Cure Cancer (iheartchaos.com)

jbell730 writes: Earlier this month, Canadian researchers at the University of Alberta discovered a wide variety of ways to treat cancer with no side effects. The mainstream media, nor pharmaceutical companies have mentioned this discovery. Why not? Because the cure is not patentable.

Submission + - Japan Plants Massive Solar Energy Network by 2030 (inhabitat.com)

PeteRoss writes: The Prime Minister of Japan, Naoto Kan, is about to announce to the G8 Summit in France his country’s plans to mandate that all buildings come equipped with solar panels by 2030. The announcement of this mandate comes in the wake of the March 11th earthquake and ensuing tsunami that caused a major nuclear crisis at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. This national solar array could help wean the country off of nuclear power and push them into a cleaner, safer future.

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