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Comment Re:Why should this be surprising? (Score 1) 118

When has an intern done any actual productive work? Every place I worked, the interns were always assigned the most menial, busywork tasks that we could come up with.

a) The companies you've worked for pay interns peanuts so you get monkeys
b) The companies you've worked for have already decided they're no good and not to be hired
c) The companies you've worked for are too stupid to give them a chance to prove themselves
d) The companies you've worked for are overworked and needed a steam valve
e) The companies you've worked for are testing their ability to suck it up and endure
f) All of the above

Even if they're serious students you can end up with a lot of strange things from people with little or no real world experience. But I'd give anyone a fair chance to prove themselves, then fail them to coffee fetcher and busywork.

Comment I think I know where they're going with this (Score 1) 302

Employees are fickle, they switch jobs or get ill or get hit by the bus or go on strike or whatever taking all their knowledge and experience with them and disrupting day-to-day operations. Sure you might say some companies felt their software was their assets before but they mostly still need expert operators. Automated systems accumulate far more of that value, like say Google's car project. Any one person on the team is probably easily expendable, it's the collective result that holds value. Banks used to have personal customer relationships, today 90%+ just want a webpage and some help if they have a problem. The people are not critical to the process short term as long as the system is up and running.

This obviously shifts the balance of power towards the employee instead of the employer. After all, conflicts are typically about who blinks first and if they can keep the lights on without you that makes it that much harder. I suppose it was always like that for mega-corporations but usually their customers would suffer which would bad for business and bring them back to the negotiating table but if you stare into the crystal ball... just imagine Amazon if you got automated trucks, warehouses, pickers and wrappers, purchasing system, inventory management system, warranty and support systems and so on. It could almost run itself, I suppose there'll always be people at the fringes but they would be just that.

Comment Re:Another one to add to the list (Score 1) 12

the warpath

LOL, you really do love making mountains out of molehills.

Keep trying to deny that you are just whining.

I'm not denying it. I'm asking you for proof to support your bizarre claims. Which you can't do. Thanks for playing!

Comment Re:what about h.265? (Score 2) 67

I hear it does great things for 4k, so it seems that it would be really great for HD, and even older 720 or 480 content too.

The main reason it does great on 4k/UHD is that the fixed 16x16 macroblocks in H.264 are too small, HEVC brings flexible coding tree units (CTUs) that vary from 64x64 to 16x16 which obviously has the most effect for the highest resolutions. If you restrict it to 16x16 CTUs you get a ~37% penalty on 2160p, ~19% on 1080p and ~9% penalty on 480p. So not as big a deal for older content as you might think.

Comment Re:If you want to write a book, just do it (Score 1) 349

Sure, yeah, you could take a few weekend courses and bang out some stuff and possibly even find a job paying decent money. But if you want to move up in the world you need to turn your hack and slash techniques into a refined art. The kind of crap commodity programmers write is the stuff that skilled developers get paid a lot of money cleaning up or just re-implementing. (...) If you want to work in the big leagues on important things, you need to be open to learning some things and respect the craft.

With all possible respect to all the CS experts of the world, that's not what they teach. Finding a good organization of your application that makes structures easy to break down, processes easy to follow and changes easy to implement doesn't involve deep, abstract mathematical formulations with optimal answers. It's about creating functional units (objects, layers, modules, services) with clear responsibilities that abstract away internal details, create well defined and narrow interactions, break up and explain complex logic, that everything behaves like and contains what you'd expect from common language definitions and naming conventions and with sufficient high level documentation that anyone of moderate intelligence can understand what bits need to go where.

Or to put it another way, if you sent the source code through an obfuscator the CS experts would probably be just as happy with the output as the input, after all the algorithms and functionality are all unchanged. It would make it an incomprehensible mess of spaghetti code and "there be dragons" that nobody understand how or why works, but those are practical concerns. The same is error and exception handling, CS is all about correct algorithms that never get called with invalid input or run into any of those practical problems that cause poorly written software to crash, often without leaving behind any useful reason why and if there's any possibility to just fail this and move on.

I think you're onto something about the craft and the art. If you want to make swords for an army it's a craft, if you're making a nobleman's fine blade it's an art. Most of the time what we want is robust craftsmanship, process as many passable swords as possible and discard any failures. Not very glamorous and not very artistic, we're not awarding points for style or elegance but whether the code you've built is a reliable work horse that gets the job done. Or maybe the difference between an institutional chef and a fine dining chef. One is serving a hundred people a good meal, the other can spend forever making a plate of fine art. Both are very different from being a poor chef, but being good at one doesn't really make you good at the other. And CS is the Michelin guide department.

Comment Re:Total Coincidence (Score 1) 353

You have a weird model of investigations where someone needs to prove things before actually investigating. It may indeed prove that nothing can be found here. But the only way to know that is to actually examine facts. Declaring that there's nothing to be found without even looking just makes you look biased.

Anyhow, it's not as if we haven't seen pedos in places of power before. Here's a big list:
https://medium.com/@LoriHandrahan2/daniel-rosen-s-arrest-1f7befb1762c#.sa25w4uo3

I'm not going to claim anyone is guilty of anything without proof. However, anyone who starts yelling and screaming for people to stop looking is just going to make themselves look more suspicious. You don't normally get well-connected media types to all jump on a story like this...

Comment Re:Not a unique situation (Score 2) 117

I bought a PC a while back which the family stopped using because they forgot their password and couldn't get in and it didn't come with media so they could recover it, obviously they never made recovery media but I'm sure lots of people don't — and of those who do, probably very many of them lose it anyway. I recovered the Admin password and ran the recovery on the hidden partition and bingo, back to factory state.

There's a shitload of people buying PCs for no good reason all the time.

Comment Re:He would have been better off ... (Score 4, Insightful) 127

And keep a copy of your stuff on hand before you get fired.

If you were doing it at work on company systems it's probably not "your stuff" anyway, it's probably small utilities he used to make his job easier. If you want to do something for yourself do it on your own time on your own machine, don't use any company resources and try not to do anything that would make them question your loyalty to your day job. Being a consultant or contractor is fine because everyone knows that. Being an employee with a secret double agenda is not.

Comment Re:I think the answer is obvious (Score 1) 261

Reliable is more important than cheap.

You need both for uptake. The average person won't spend more than about $300 for a gadget, and they'd rather spend $100. $300 is a pretty feasible price target for a small printer with one extruder. You could sell it without a heated bed at that price, and tell people to print only in PLA. There is high-temp PLA now which can be annealed in an oven and then handle somewhat higher temperatures, so that would cover most people's needs. Do a delta since it is cheaper to make it stable and avoid backlash, and because it uses only four sensors — ideally three hall for the X Y Z_MAX, and an inductive on the Z_MIN for bed leveling. $300 is not even a challenging price point; it can be even cheaper if you skip a display, which I don't actually think is that useful if you're not installing the printer in a remote location.

Comment Re:Lucky he got off so light (Score 1) 127

Somebody still owns that ISP's assets. Two things, though...

1) Good luck getting $26K from an inmate - at a buck or two a day, twenty-six grand will take a lot longer than two years, and

Assuming he had zero assets before the trial. Any down payment on a mortgage, a car in good shape and you're pretty close.

2) If the courts determined that he only did $26,000.00 worth of damage, I'm guessing this ISP was probably already circling the bowl. After all, if he was solely responsible for breaking this ISP, one would expect a far higher award for damages, regardless of (1), above.

Probably. It could also be that it was easy to prove he did at least $26k worth of damage, he has no more assets and the trustee wants the bankruptcy settled and think the practical value of a higher judgement is zero. Except for when the RIAA/MPAA/BSA want big numbers for PR reasons, they're often willing to settle for what you have.

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