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Comment Just a bit of nostalgia (Score 2) 48

Fond memories of using something like this, if not SixXS itself over 10 years ago. Our ISP didn't do v6, and we needed to test with it. Tunnel providers to the rescue! Now even my local ISP that everybody complains about provides v4 and v6. It's been in Windows for... how many versions now?

I'd forgotten all about these tunnel providers. News of one shutting down and a trip down nostalgia lane seems appropriate. So long, and thank-you for providing something that we needed at the time.

Comment Re:It's sooo easy! (Score 1) 125

Didn't matter a lot. Maybe it was a honeypot, maybe it checked a whole bunch of sites in a man in the middle attack- but I DIDN'T type in my username, so they would have had to check all the lists of millions of entries and do it very quickly, so I don't think so. And it listed out which breach it was, and it matched up. And I think it used a rainbow table for checking it, so they (allegedly) weren't sending my password in the clear.

It makes little difference, I didn't give a shit about any of the accounts, and I changed them all using LastPass to random 16 mixed character passwords.

Comment Re:3 articles referencing the same statement, misu (Score 1) 125

> You have to always assume your pc has been hacked.

LOL. You can't polish a turd. If your PC is hacked they can grab your password as you type it in anyway, so using an online password storage makes no material difference to security as opposed to using your brain, but the online security is much more convenient, and the online stored passwords are much longer and more random, whereas you've admitted that your passwords are total shit.

Comment Re:It's sooo easy! (Score 1) 125

You know what? You're not nearly as smart as you think you are. I first typed in random 'passwords' that weren't my LOW security password, and it said that those hadn't been hacked. And I didn't type in any of my high security passwords, and those are different on each site anyway, so there wouldn't be any point.

"Use a few passwords and variations of those. add caps and exchange letters for numbers aka "l33t"

Hahaha. Don't do that, moron.

Comment Re:It's sooo easy! (Score 1) 125

I too have a password I've used over ten years.

I only use this for low security accounts that don't have any financial implications associated to them. But yes, that password got hacked.

I know this because I typed it into a 'has your password been hacked' site and it said yep, and told me what had happened. These sites exist because lists of passwords that have been hacked exist.

IRC I think it got cracked on yahoo or something; it wasn't like anything I'd done wrong.

Comment Re:Huh? I use these all the time. (Score 1) 258

This gets down to something that used to be a common UI design principle before software became so feature-ful it became impractical: manifest interface.

The idea of a manifest interface (which also is a principle in language and API design) is that if the software has a capability you should be able to see it. You shouldn't have to root around to stumble upon it. Tabs follow this principle; there's enough visual and behavioral cues to suggest that you need to click on a tab. The little "x" in the tab also follows this principle.

But context menus you access by right-clicking break this rule, which means that there may be millions of people laboriously clicking on "x" after "x", unaware that they can make all the extraneous tabs in their browser disappear with just two clicks.

This, by the way, is why Macintoshes were designed with one button on the mouse. But even Mac UI designers couldn't get by with just single and double-click, so you have option-click too, bit by in large you could operate most programs without it.

Anyhow, to make sure people know about this kind of feature, your program is going to have to watch their behavior and suggest they try right clicking. But that way lies Clippy...

Comment If I were a farmer, here's what I'd do. (Score 3, Insightful) 494

I'd research alternatives to John Deere. I think there are actually some, right? If there are, I'd go to the Deere dealers first. I'd take my time, chat up the sales guy, get all the way to what looks like a closed sale. Then just as I'm about to sign I'd back out and tell him why. Waste their sales guy's time, and tell all your buddies to do it too.

If all of the companies are pulling this shit, it might be time for another tractorcade like we had in the 70s. Block the Beltway and turn up the turf on the Mall like they did back then. Maybe that'll get their attention.

Comment Re:Making NASA Great Again (Score 5, Informative) 300

Actually the Wikipedia article on the National Aeronautics and Space Act has an interesting list of the legislation's priorities, starting with priority #1:

The expansion of human knowledge of phenomena in the atmosphere and space;

Historically speaking the act, which was signed into law in July of 1958, was a reaction to the "Sputnik Crisis" created by the Soviet launch of an artificial satellite eight months earlier in October of 1957 -- an act which filled Americans with awe and a little dread, knowing that a Soviet device was passing overhead every 96 minutes.

So arguably NASA was founded to achieve preeminence in Earth orbit, not necessarily manned space exploration, which isn't mentioned at all in the legislation. Yuri Gagarin's Vostok 1 flight was still three years in the future, and JFKs Rice Moon Speech followed a year and a half after that. That speech is well worth watching, by the way, if all you've ever seen is the "We choose to go to the moon" line.

Manned exploration of the outer solar system wasn't really what the founding of NASA was all about; in fact manned spaceflight has only a single mention in the unamended 1958 text:

... the term "aeronautical and space vehicles" means aircraft, missiles, satellites, and other space vehicles, manned and unmanned, together with related equipment, devices, components, and parts.

The main focus of NASA at its founding was to provide a single agency to coordinate space and spaced-based research, which at the time would have been largely (although not exclusively) Earth-focused.

Comment Re:Worked@IBM in 1980's, left, because sucked. (Score 1) 298

Yeah, I worked the noon to 9 shift at IBM Boca for a while. About half the time, the afternoon rain storm would blow in a bit early and I'd get drenched walking from the car to the building, which they kept at 72 degrees all year round. The next couple of hours usually consisted in trying to avoid slipping into hypothermia and dying in the building.

Last time I left was in 2005 in Colorado. At the time, they would just throw a bunch of people in a room. They were nice enough to throw up some half-cube walls so we could face the wall and get some semblance of a distraction-free environment. They still think they can pay well below market rates just because they're IBM, even when they're hiring you on as a third party contractor and even though their FTE benefits program is only marginally better than the third party contracting houses are offering these days.

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