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Comment Re:not limitless (Score 2) 81

$200 per head seems about right on price, if I had to hire some consultants to throw together a network for 3 days, then tear it all down, seems like a bargain

I dunno what prices you've been conned into paying, but that parses as gouging to me.

Consultants aren't necessary; Hofstra already has an IT infrastructure and staff in place. At worst, they'd have to deploy a couple dozen more WAPs and maybe a 24-port switch if you don't already have the ports free -- maybe USD$4000.00 worth of HW. Set up a new SSID for the reporters with a WPA2 login, which lands you on a temporary VLAN and subnet that routes directly to the Internet and nowhere else. Takes maybe a day to set up, and most of that is CS interns/undergrads pulling Cat.6 and placing WAPs/antennas.

After the debate, turn off the SSID, VLAN, and subnet -- you can pull out the WAPs (if you must) at your leisure. Put the HW away; save it for the next big event, or when an endowment arrives for the next building.

How does this justify $200/head? (Seriously; what am I not figuring here?)

Comment Mediacom Are Full of Shit (Score 1) 212

Once again, we have an entrenched, meritlessly entitled incumbent trying to get you to pay attention to the wrong thing. In this case, it's an insultingly laughable analogy that any moderately aware shopper will see right through.

To illustrate this, here's a tray of regular Oreos(TM), and here's a similarly sized tray of double-stuf(TM) Oreos(TM). And if you were to consider the per-cookie cost, as Mediacom is clearly hoping you will, then yes, double-stuf(TM) Oreos(TM) cost more than regular Oreos(TM).

But foodstuffs such as cookies are not sold by the cookie. They're sold by unit weight (or unit mass if you want to be pedantic). Considered this way, the per-ounce cost of the regular and double-stuf(TM) Oreos(TM) is virtually identical (in this case, about $0.26/oz from this retailer). So if Nabisco(TM) has no reason to charge a premium simply because you consume the cookies in larger units, Mediacom has no such reason, either.

So Mediacom are full of shit.

Comment I Knew There Was Something Fishy... (Score 5, Insightful) 162

A couple years ago, I set up a FreeNAS box to solve the problem of, "the file I want to work with is not on the machine in front of me." Once set up, I also wanted a media server so I could watch stuff on the TV in the living room. Many of the comments in the FreeNAS discussion fora spoke well of Plex, which is available for FreeNAS as a plugin jail. So I installed it and gave it a spin.

I immediately knew something was fishy when I tried to connect to the local server, and the login page didn't work. I run Firefox with NoScript installed. I had the local server IP whitelisted, but the page ignored all button clicks. I click on the NoScript icon... And discover that it's trying to pull in boatloads of JavaScript from Plex.tv.

"WRONG!" exclaimed I. The whole point of a local media server such as Plex is for all media-serving code and resources to be hosted locally on my server hardware. The moment you start reaching outside the LAN to do anything, you are no longer a local server.

This discovery basically shattered any alleged positive value Plex may have had, since its primary function -- the basis on which it was sold to me -- turned out to be a lie. I promptly uninstalled it.

Now, it seems Plex has dropped the pretense altogether, and are just another disk farm outside my control. Good luck with that, guys; I'm sure you'll be able to beat Apple, Google, and Amazon at that game.

Comment Re:Reduced OS for short term gains. (Score 1) 55

In Android at least, only one application can be running at the same time (no background processing unless you program a service for your app)

Bollocks.

And the rest of what you say has nothing to do with Android or ChromeOS. You can have access to root in both. Android devices generally have it disabled but it can be enabled - of course, even CyanogenMod discourages root access these days, as it shouldn't be necessary. ChromeOS? Off by default, but every ChromeBook let's you reconfigure ChromeOS to allow root if you desperately want it. As for "Spyware", it's entirely up to you whether you use Google's services or not.

And none of your objections have anything to do with the original point. You're complaining about the UI disabling certain features. The underlying operating system has those features. And, frankly, easy access to root was something that Windows 95 gave you by default that NT made a little harder to get...

Comment Re:Crucial question (Score 2) 55

What's interesting about it? Netbook/Tablet hybrids are widely available already! Most of them come with Windows 10, but you can install anything you like on them.

But, FWIW, Chromebooks generally have a feature, sometimes implemented in hardware, sometimes in software, that disables the TPM module so you can either access the operating system as a developer, or wipe the OS completely and put on a more usual desktop system.

Comment Re:Reduced OS for short term gains. (Score 1) 55

I'm not sure if you're aware of this, but both Android and ChromeOS (presumably meaning the OS under discussion here too) are full blown modern operating systems with networking, permissions, memory protection, etc. They are both on a par with Unix in terms of features. They both, however, have user interfaces that block user access to certain features of the operating system.

This is nothing like the jump from 95 to NT.

Comment Re:And IMDB cares about this *why*, exactly? (Score 1) 300

No reason those jobs have be in Santa Monica though. Or anywhere else in CA. Move them to Seattle like the rest of the company.

Maybe this Google query will give you a hint as to why they have an office in Santa Monica.

Hint: It isn't because top networking specialists and PHP programmers are best found in Los Angeles.

Submission + - OpenSSL Patches Bug Created by Patch From Last Week

Trailrunner7 writes: Four days after releasing a new version that fixed several security problems, the OpenSSL maintainers have rushed out another version that patches a vulnerability introduced in version 1.1.0a on Sept. 22.

Last week, OpenSSL patched 14 security flaws in various versions of the software, which is the most widely used toolkit for implementing TLS. One of the vulnerabilities fixed in that release was a low-risk bug related to memory allocation in tls_get_message_header.

The problem is, the patch for that vulnerability actually introduced a separate critical bug. The new vulnerability, which is fixed in version 1.1.0b, only affected version 1.1.0a, but it can lead to arbitrary code execution.

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