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Comment Re:Pay your fucking taxes instead (Score 1) 164

The proportional amount of work requires increases as you increase your income relative to your starting assets

Now that's comedy gold, do you have more jokes like this? Since when is the amount of money you make in any relation to your workload? How much more work do you think Allen did compared to, say, a single mother working 3 jobs to make ends meet?

Comment Re:COBOL isn't hard to learn (Score 2) 302

Indeed. If there is a market for COBOL programmers (and it's clear there is), then the obvious solution is for unis and colleges to spit out more COBOL-literate CS graduates. Honestly, if I was ten years younger, I'd probably delve into it myself. It is, after all, just a programming language, and hardly on the same level of trying to learn Sanskrit.

Comment Re:The Widow (Score 1) 190

I'm still trying to figure out how I didn't know about it until just recently.

Oh, I'll tell you why. Because season one only recently came to Netflix. It's the same as with Preacher, and Hap & Leonard and other cool shows. The target demographic (idiots like me) don't watch cable TV, but when it comes to Netflix, we're all over it.

Comment Re:OP fired because of this article (Score 2) 214

Legally, it's a grey area. If your employment contract has morality clauses, for example, you can be punished for things done outside of work. However, usually that is limited to situations where your contract explicitly states it, which usually happens when working for religious institutions (or, occasionally, schools). You can also be fired for actions that reflect badly on your company, but that assumes that A. people know the author works for that company, and B. they have reason to somehow connect the two. And of course, in at-will states, your employment can be potentially terminated for any reason, though in many, the implied covenant of good faith might give the author grounds to argue that this was without cause, done out of malice arising out of personal embarrassment on the part of the management team.

The bottom line would be that the author should contact a lawyer who regularly deals with employment law in that part of the country, because whether he has a case or not is highly dependent on where the author is located, and I'm pretty sure it won't be open-and-shut no matter where the author lives. However, the fact that the author has not revealed where he works does open the opportunity for the lawyer to point out that bringing this to court will cast their company in a very bad light publicly, whereas an out-of-court settlement for... say ten years' salary will not. Depending on how terrified the company is, such (entirely legal) blackmail might actually be more effective than bringing a suit.

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