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Comment Re: Note that what's large... (Score 4, Informative) 73

Venus has multiple "tropopauses" and "stratospheres", depending on how you define them. The atmosphere is like a layer cake with multiple convection zones (like Earth's troposphere) separated by areas of dynamic stability (like Earth's stratosphere). And again, ~50-70km is an awfullly long way from the surface, and surface winds are weak. But, there's a lot about Venus that we don't understand.

Comment Re:Well Trump has one thing right (Score 1) 529

What complete and utter shite are you spewing?

Actual experience of my wife with H1-B employees (including the "chagrined when discovering the forged credentials" case).

When getting your H1-B you need to provide documentation from your university as proof of your degree. The university must be on a list recognized by the US government. They validate the information with the university rather than just rubberstamping it.

Any of the following would explain that:
  - The agency faked the references, too.
  - The government didn't do the validation you claim it does in every case.
  - The government doesn't do the validation you claim and you're talking through your hat.

Please put your flamage aside for the moment and give us a reference to documentation showing that the government officials actually check credentials, rather than doing spot-checks or taking the applicant's word for them (or bribes).

Comment Note that what's large... (Score 3, Informative) 73

.... is the size, not the intensity. The air moves only slightly faster or slower than the surrounding atmosphere as one passes through the wave.

They weren't expected on Venus, though. Venus's surface is dozens of kilometers down, thick and "soupy" there, transitioning to thinner layers above. It was surprising to see that surface features that far away, in a fluid that can compress, would still make clear phenomena like gravity waves in the high atmosphere.

Comment Needed environment for me is 7, 7pro, 8, 8.1 only (Score 1) 453

Meanwhile Win 3.11... Is still running fine on test equipment. The manufacturer says do not upgrade to any other version of Windows.

I have a gang-programming-and-testing production tool from one of the top three (or so) manufacturers of BLE systems-on-a-chip. Our startup needs this (or a suitable alternative) to go into volume production of our initial products.

It comes with an application - in source in a build environment. This allows it to be customized, to add tests for the peripherals added to make the final assembly, and to integrate into production processes and databases.

But the build environment is only supported in Windows 7, 7 Pro, 8, and 8.1, using Visual Studio 2012. The executables and DLLs produced run only on those or XP.

The executable/DLLs use .NET, too, and the way they use it breaks the GUI under wine, even with genuine Microsoft .NET installed. They run correctly, but the status display is corrupted in a way that makes it unusable. So at the production site it needs to run on genuine Windows at one of those levels. B-b

As of the last time I checked (a couple months ago), the manufacturer is unwilling to port to another OS or version - even though all of them (except maybe 7 Pro) have been end-of-lifed by Microsoft.

Comment Re:False premise (Score 1) 480

Well, it hasn't happened yet. That said, why would you cancel your cable Internet for this? Yes, cellular Internet will be useful for your Chromebook when you're away from home, but in the same way it is today - a useful supplementary service that fills in the gaps, not as your primary system.

As for how you'd connect to a server at home, there are two options: VPN, or IPv6. The latter tends to get forgotten, but I connect to machines at home directly via IPv6 from my (T-Mobile) cellular connection without any problems. This sounds horrifying in terms of security, but if you imagine the development server being as locked down as a Chromebook or iDevice, without the back doors associated with too many modern IoT devices, it should be fine.

I'm more bothered about having to develop using a web interface, especially in an era in which leaving Firefox open for a day with 20 or so tabs open seems to result in it eating 4+Gb of memory, not the connectivity part. The connectivity part is actually the nice part.

Comment Re:way too generous (Score 1) 486

I did no such thing. GenX is not a generation. Neither is GenY, or the boomers, or the millennials. These are all marketing bullshit terms. A generation is the time between the birth of a child and the birth of that child's children.

Yet you keep talking about Boomers as if they are a generation.

Gee, it's almost like you're still searching for a way out of your gaffe instead of just saying "Oh yeah, GenX too".

Comment Re:False premise (Score 1) 480

Maybe...

I bought a consumer NAS a year or so ago, which is a collection of servers (software, from Samba to various video streaming DLNA type things) running over GNU/Linux, connected to a big hard drive. It's still a little bit of a nerds thing, but I can totally see people wanting to use things like this to ensure they have control over their own content.

And after I got a Chromebook, I started to wonder how far off we are having similar devices that host IDEs (don't laugh, there are quite a few web based IDEs out there, Eclipse has two such projects, though in my view they're not ready for prime time.) You could, in theory, use your Chromebook as-is in the future, with a third party, locked down, server that has an IDE on it, to develop Android apps. Hell (and I mean hell), if Google gets involved, that might become the recommended development environment.

Comment Am I the only one... (Score 5, Interesting) 128

.... who can't help but cheer at my screen when they nail one of those landings? Now I finally understand how sports fans feel when they watch a game and do the same thing ;)

One thing nobody can deny about them is optimism. ;) Seriously, their IPS numbers are, pardon the pun, out of this world. $200k per booster launch. $500k per tanker launch. I mean, really? Good luck with that. No, seriously, good luck with that; I won't be expecting anything close to that, but please by all means prove me wrong ;) ITS would be a great system to have, I've been playing around with some Venus trajectories with it recently. Looks like it can do a low-energy transit with nearly 300 tonnes of payload from LEO and back again with the same, over 400 if starting at a high orbit - but from an economics perspective the high energy transfers actually make more sense.

I noticed a lot of people were confused about why Musk wanted the trips to be so short and was willing to sacrifice so much payload to do so - many assumed it had to do with radiation or something. But the issue is, when your craft costs so much but your launch costs are cheap, you can't have it spending all of its time drifting in deep space, you need to get it back for a new mission as soon as possible. There's a balancing point, in that if you try to go too fast, you reduce useful payload below the point of making up for it with going faster - but a minimum energy trajectory is just not optimal when the ratio between launch costs and transit vehicle cost is so extreme. I come up with the same thing from Venus as they were getting for Mars, although for the Venus case you end up aerobraking to a highly elliptical orbit rather than to the surface for ISRU refill (you need ISRU, but for the ascent stages, so it's not realistic to do so for the return stage in the nearer term). So for Venus they get no refill like on Mars, but they also don't have to do a powered landing nor do an ascent on return - it's six of one, half a dozen of the other. Both are quite accessible with it.

Comment Re:Great strides (Score 1) 128

It depends what you mean by "refurbishing"; each element is different.

The solid rocket boosters, for example, suffered a hard impact into salt water. They then had to be fished out of the water. And of course you don't just "refill" a SRB, they have to be taken apart and recast, then put back together.

The ET is disposable, and had to be rebuilt from scratch.

The orbiter was legitimately reusable, but with design flaws.

I don't blame the shuttle program - they were sort of pigeonholed into this dead end by circumstances. The concept came about during the heyday of the Apollo Programme, when NASA budgets were serious. It was supposed to be a much more reusable, much more maintainable, and somewhat smaller system. It was supposed to then have a huge flight rate supporting all of these big projects that were on NASA's docket, including a permanent moon base and a huge manned orbital station dwarfing ISS, which was supposed to replace Skylab.

But of course, Vietnam and the realities of having soundly trounced the USSR in the space race led to their budgets being slashed, which pushed the program into ever more untenable positions until it was nothing more than a jobs programme. Forget full flyback reusability of all parts. Forget the titanium frame for the shuttle, which would have let it run hot and thus not required so sensitive of a TPS. Go begging for money and be forced to modify the design to meet Air Force requirements, pushing you into an inferior design position. On and on.

If I'd fault them for anything, it'd be for going straight for a full reusable workhorse rather than a small-scale pilot programme first. But those were the days of optimism. Optimism which only recently seems to start being regained.

Either way, the Falcon boosters are a very different beast. A vertical soft landing is hugely different from the SRBs, yet the thermal issues are far easier than with the Shuttle. And the Merlins were designed from the start under the principle of preventing the need for a full teardown. That doesn't mean that they will be cheap to reuse. But it does mean that they have the possibility of it.

I do think SpaceX had a rather clever strategy, in that while their goal was reusable, they made a rocket that in the process was cheap as a disposable. So they could get volume and flight history while working on getting the kinks out. They may have flown too close to the sun with the densified propellants and (externally) unlined COPVs, but obviously, with a company like this, their whole existence is to push the envelope.

Comment Re: Awesome (Score 3, Insightful) 128

Most of Europe agrees with you. And even the US agrees with you up through high school plus with various forms of assistance for college, including state-subsidies, particularly for state colleges, and federal subsidies (direct subsidies, tax credits, and tax breaks), roughly $80B/year each. Pell grants alone cost the government $35B.

Comment Re:Enter the casual, brazen SJW injection (Score 0) 486

Not necessarily relevant even if true (and I'm not sure that's true for many > 3.) If the tens of millions that came over more recently were significantly poorer than the average American, this would obviously significantly drag down the average socioeconomic status, yes?

I like how you argue it's irrelevant and then argue that it's relevant. It definitely shows the level of clarity involved in your analysis.

What statistics?

There's a giant mountain of them. Considering you can't even bother to google the number of Latinos in the US so that you can compare with your fears about undocumented workers, it's abundantly clear giving you any statistics is an utter waste of time.

Are you asserting that the 11 million undocumented Latinos (nevermind all of the documented Latinos who have been here for only a few generations) had assets, education and income equal or exceeding that of the average American when they entered the country?

Nope. What percentage of Latinos in the US is that 11 million? Because again, it would have to be a very significant percentage in order to drag the entire demographic down so far from whites. After all you are asserting that the difference between whites and Latinos is entirely caused by undocumented workers.

Keep lying and calling it truth.

I'm not the one lying. Technically, you aren't either since it's just a mountain of ignorance you're throwing around.

Comment Re:Enter the casual, brazen SJW injection (Score 1) 486

I remember Crimea and Eastern Ukraine separatism. I remember several movements for Quebec to secede from Canada. I remember movements for Basque and Catalunya to secede. I remember the breakup of countless European states. I remember countless former and extant exclaves, such as Llívia, which obviously would not exist if not for separatism largely based on hundreds of years of the populations speaking different languages.

And yet you can't remember actual US history, and instead substitute the history of other countries.

I also remember that lawmakers in the USA did not attempt to allow there to be multiple official languages in government institutions and schools in the 1800s and before.

That would be incorrect. Because the US never has had an official language, much less multiple. In places where a non-English language is common, the government has always had either documents in the local dominant language, or the people working at those government offices spoke the non-English dominant language. Just as you will find in any place with a significantly-sized "Chinatown" today. But they aren't Latinos, so it's OK.

That can happen depending on population densities and cultural attitudes of the immigrants, but it certainly isn't guaranteed to happen particularly if efforts to officially recognize, support and pander to a second language succeed.

Again, there is actual history here to guide you on what happens, what doesn't happen, and how likely it is to happen. You're ignoring it so that you can comfortably reside in your concern trolling.

Get out some more. Talk to people who don't look like you. You'll find out some things about what actually happens outside your comfort zone.

Comment Re: Is more education, better education . . . ? (Score 2) 486

You are simply mis-reading what is stated in that document. The US citizen parent had to be resident in the US for ten years (prior to the birth). How can I be so certain? I am in a similar category, but was born outside the US to a US mother and a father who had not been ten years resident in the US. I had, since birth, US citizenship until I renounced a few years ago.

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