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Comment Re: Why is this guy still talking (Score 1) 336

Less hours and more free time drastically reduces the value of your labor. Since MBA cost accountants figure overhead as fixed + variable costs it makes sense to fire you and overwork the other guy.

During the recession everyone worked 70 to 80 hours a week or 0. You just have one guy do the work of the laid off one or get rid of the secretaries and assistants or lead scouts and place the burden on the other guy ... And still expect same numbers.

Time is never reduced ever

Comment Re:I thought diesel ran cleaner (Score 1) 85

Typical compression ratio in a Diesel engine is somewhere around 20:1, vs a gasoline engine that's running 10:1 or there about.

So what?

Basically this is displacement/cylinder * compression ratio * RPM * number of intake strokes per revolution.

The compression ratio is a function of the head volume and the cylinder volume. It has nothing to do whatsoever with determining how much air is drawn into the engine, which is defined by speed, bore, stroke, and intake efficiency. It is rather determined by how much air is drawn into the engine, and how much space you have left for air at the end of a compression stroke.

Ever wondered why diesel tail pipes are a lot larger than gasoline ones? This is why, diesels move a lot more air.

Diesel tail pipes are a lot larger than gasoline ones because diesels shit the bed when you have backpressure. It ruins their efficiency and you have to play tricks to get it back. Turbocharging is worth it anyway because it's turbocharging. Now, pay attention to this part, because it's important: exhaust gas volume is proportional to load. Diesels have bigger exhausts because they have more torque. This is also why turbochargers and diesels go together so well. Turbochargers are driven by exhaust gas expansion, which as mentioned, is proportional to load.

If you carve the piston out, you lower the compression ratio, and you increase the amount of air the engine consumes. You in fact have this exactly backwards.

Comment Re:I thought diesel ran cleaner (Score 1) 85

Not when cruising at 65 mph. Not even close.

Well, tell us what it is. Neither of my turbos boost that high, but they're both old. (My F250 peaks out at 11 psi and my Mercedes at 12.) The F250 cruises at only around 2 psi unless you have a trailer, then it's more like 6 or 7. The Mercedes cruises at around 7 or 8 psi. But they have much lower boost pressure than modern diesels.

Comment Re:So much for biodiesel use... (Score 1) 85

And still has a hell of a lot of particulate emissions, negatively impacting air quality in major cities, which you might note are the entities banning the diesels here.

Gasoline has just as much particulate emissions as diesel. It's just a smaller soot particle which we couldn't accurately measure until recently. Of course, DPFs on diesels reburn the soot until it's a small, invisible particle just like gasoline, making it just as dangerous as gasoline.

Banning diesel is not the remedy. Banning combustion is the remedy. Banning diesel is just stupid.

Comment Re:Democrats are the enemy (Score 1) 549

They're all going to agree to never lobby for foreign entities, and go half a decade after they leave office before they can do that work domestically.

Guess what? Those agreements are unconstitutional and won't stand. That's like a Californian signing a non-compete agreement. Okay! Sure!

Comment Re:The litmus test (Score 1) 80

While I agree with everything you've said, you're making false equivalences... One (huge) mistake doesn't turn a legit news organization into a supermarket tabloid, just as a few lies on one side doesn't balance out a voluminous blatant and continuous intentional disinformation campaign on the other side.

THAT is a perfectly valid reason why discussion on the topic tends to be one-sided, even if problems on the other side need to be resolved as well.

Comment Re:So much for public charging locations (Score 2) 122

Should be trivial to construct a USB charging cable with inline fuses (or sacrificial caps/resistors/diodes), maybe adding $1 to the cost of the cable, and protecting your expensive devices from not just intentional sabotage, but also cheap, poorly engineered chargers, which might just kill you.

It was already bad hygiene to plug-in a USB cable that has the data lines intact into a public port, as all your data could be quietly siphoned off, and malware loaded on. If this new threat gets people to pay attention to previous threats, we might all be better off for it.

Comment Re:Milton Frieldman? (Score 1) 334

So.......we just had an article on Slashdot that showed there are more jobs in America now, at the end of the Obama administration, than there ever have been in the entire history of the US. More people working.

First, I'm not about to claim that Trump is going to improve anything for the common man. Having a populist revolt that emplaces a Billionare cabinet...

Yes, Obama got more people to work than anyone else ever. However, middle-class well-being has not correspondingly increased (meaning wages aren't great for a lot of those jobs) and the disparity between the most rich and everyone else has become much larger.

I haven't researched AI job reduction, but I think we could be no more than two decades away from the point where much menial labor is robotic and where professional drivers are for the most part replaced with machines.

Comment Milton Frieldman? (Score 4, Interesting) 334

Both Brexit and Trump can be seen as the final stage of neoliberal economics: it ends in a populist revolt.

It's not as if labor is just now facing the threat of automation. But nobody in the US - not the unions, not the companies, not the government - is solving the education gap that might help future workers.

Comment Re:Mozilla's 990 Form (Score 1) 103

MoCo could have paid as little as $1 for the license, along with an agreement to return profits, and that would be fair value. There's no question that the profits were returned.

However, there was never any possibility that any other entity would have been offered the license regardless of what they offered, and IMO had they considered that transaction based on the amount returned rather than achieving their purpose of a free internet, they would have disqualified themselves as a 501(c)3.

Comment Re:Encrypt! (Score 1) 394

Let's encrypt (LE) runs some kind of agent that does some voodoo to automatically renew certs on a quarterly basis.... If certs want to be free why not just let them be free without requiring these weird agents and piecemeal expiry periods? What's the point in that?

Stray thought: if they renew every 3 months as you describe, I wonder if that's intended to be a substitute for the cert-revocation abilities that come with CAs?

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