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Comment Re:AI -- FAR more hype than substance (Score 1) 189

But the things you listed aren't features of intelligence, they're bugs in our brains (or simply, things that natural selection de-emphasized out of comparative irrelevance in your basic cave man survival scenario).

Nope, they aren't "bugs." Learning is fundamentally about prioritizing information, making "higher-level connections," creating abstractions that lead to "understanding," etc. No AI system can do this on even the level of a small human child. But a fundamental process necessary to this stuff is being able to prioritize information, which necessarily entails de-emphasizing most of input that's less relevant. It doesn't NEED to be forgotten, but these "bugs" are probably the most efficient way of dealing with the problem.

If those short term memories were more reliably committed to long-term, or there was no real distinction between those things, would that really be a disqualifyier for intelligence?

Yes, if the "long-term" commitment was not accompanied by an incredibly complex (by current AI standards) abstraction process that effectively renders most of the irrelevant "long-term" data as "background" that would rarely or never be accessed anyway. "Forgetting" again is not essential to the process of intelligence, but it likely makes it a lot more efficient and easier for the algorithms in our brains to work. A computer AI which refuses to prioritize information in this way is always going to lag way behind human comprehension.

Comment Re:easily made up in peripherals. (Score 1) 448

Your suggestion, in a thread about relative costs of systems, is to buy a custom piece of hardware, from a vendor who's website doesn't actually list a price.

Y'all got Amazon where you live? Or access to any of the vendors they list on their website?

But it's not like Windows can backup to thin air. You have to have something on the other end of that CAT-5, so it's probably a wash hardware-wise.

Do you know what I think when I see a website selling a product but not listing a unit price.

"Huh, I wonder if Amazon has them?" would have been my first thought, but apparently it wasn't yours.

Comment Re:First lesson (Score 2, Interesting) 109

I have two major beefs with IPV6. The first is that the end-point 2^48 switch address space wasn't well thought-through. Hey, wouldn't it be great if we didn't have to use NAT and give all of those IOT devices their own IPV6 address? Well... no actually, NAT does a pretty good job of obscuring the internal topology of the end-point network. Just having a statefull firewall and no NAT exposes the internal topology. Not such a good idea.

The second is that all the discovery protocols were left unencrypted and made complex enough to virtually guarantee a plethora of possible exploits. Some have been discovered and fixed, I guarantee there are many more in the wings. IPV4 security is a well known problem with well known solutions. IPV6 security is a different beast entirely.

Other problems including the excessively flexible protocol layering allowing for all sorts of encapsulation tricks (some of which have already been demonstrated), pasting on a 'mandatory' IPSEC without integration with a mandatory secure validation framework (making it worthless w/regards to generic applications being able to assert a packet-level secure connection), assumptions that the address space would be too big to scan (yah right... the hackers didn't get that memo my tcpdump tells me), not making use of MAC-layer features that would have improved local LAN security, if only a little. Also idiotically and arbitrarily blocking off a switch subspace, eating 48 bits for no good reason and trying to disallow routing within that space (which will soon have to be changed considering that number of people who want to have stateful *routers* to break up their sub-48-bit traffic and who have no desire whatsoever to treat those 48 bits as one big switched sub-space).

The list goes on. But now we are saddled with this pile, so we have to deal with it.


Comment I would believe it. (Score 3, Insightful) 163

I'm quite left of center and the hate for Hillary among my group is probably as bad as the Trump fan hate for Hillary, and people have been complaining about posts disappearing.

Editing content makes you responsible for the content itself, as you are exerting control over it.

I believe practices like this are ridiculously dumb.

Especially since I consider "hate speech" a great idiot filter. It allows me to keep my friends list trimmed. Just like a Confederate flag is, or Trump signs in the yard. But that's my own choosing. I don't want Facebook choosing for me.

Yeah, I know, if it's free you are the product. The problem is that the telnet chat that everyone used has been abandoned (even though it's still up after all these years).


Comment Flood defenses? (Score 5, Informative) 109

There is no flood defense possible for most businesses at the tail-end of the pipe. When an attacker pushes a terrabit/s at you and at all the routers in the path leading to you as well as other leafs that terminate at those routers, from 3 million different IP addresses from compromised IOT devices, your internet pipes are dead, no matter how much redundancy you have.

Only the biggest companies out there can handle these kinds of attacks. The backbone providers have some defenses, but it isn't as simple as just blocking a few IPs.


Comment Re:Wow... (Score 3, Interesting) 177

I dunno. This story just makes me feel better about not buying Apple products. I can buy any cable I like and not have to worry about this bullshit.

"OMG. You didn't buy a genuine monster cable! Quick, toss it out before it EXPLODES!"

Which bullshit? The bulishit of shoddy cables destroying your laptop?

Comment Re:easily made up in peripherals. (Score 3, Informative) 448

if things ever get too hairy for a dell, your restore process is entirely automated in windows or linux. restoring a mac is nothing short of corporate witchcraft.

To backup: buy a Synology NAS. Enable the Time Machine service. Configure your Macs to back up to it. Voila, done.

To restore from scratch: hold down Command-R when booting a Mac. Tell it to restore from Time Machine. Wait an hour. Voila, done.

Comment Re:There is something to that... (Score 1) 448

because Mac is like 10 percent of the worlds PC sales, and the viruses usually dont survive that far when the percentage of ownership is that low

That has zero to do with the relative dearth of malware on Macs. (Pausing for a moment for a pedant to point out the one or two Mac bugs they've read about. Yes, we know. It's still proportionally much less than Mac's market share so move along.) Macs are initially more expensive, but that also means there owners tend to have more money and therefore the machines are more valuable targets. There are also still tens of millions of Macs out there in the wild. Even if there are more PCs, there are still a hell of a lot of Macs to be owned for anyone interested and capable. The fact that they're not is an indicator that building a nice interface on top of a solid Unix platform is a good way to end up with a stable, secure desktop.

Comment Re:Account Recovery (Score 2) 104

Google no longer supports non-security questions for account recovery.

FTFY. Security questions are a joke. The answers are almost always easy for an attacker with a little bit of information about you to find, and a lot of the time the legitimate user can't remember them. Moreover, those two traits are strongly correlated: the harder it is for an attacker to find the answers, the more likely it is that the user won't be able to find them either.

Everyone should stop using them.

Comment Re:Reason (Score 1) 104

Google doesn't actually want your phone number for security. Google wants your phone number so that they can link the account in their database to other information that contains your phone number.

The number is to make account recovery possible in the event you've forgotten your password. The assumption is that attackers won't have access to your phone. That assumption is violated if your telco will transfer your number to the attacker's phone, of course.

If you prefer not to give your phone number to Google, don't. Just turn on two-factor auth using a non phone number-based auth method, either the Authenticator app or (better yet) a security key, or both. Then download and print out some backup 2FA codes and keep them somewhere safe. Google won't have your phone number and you won't be vulnerable to mistakes by dumb telco customer service reps.

Comment Re:Is that all (Score 1) 502

It's inevitable that a certain fraction of people go off the deep edge. People are irrational, even (or perhaps mostly) people who are convinced they are entirely rational. Rationality is a fragile thing because emotion and confirmation bias are deeply woven into everyone's thinking.

For normal people are few more powerful emotional impulses than the urge to protect children. It should hardly be surprising that children come to harm from it.

Comment Re:Is that all (Score 2) 502

rather than believe their childrens' autism is inherited and that it might be their fault

Having a bad gene is not someone's fault, the best that you can say is 'bad luck'. If it is severe and you know that you have it, then maybe you should think hard before you have children. Some people with genetic problems do do that, or have the foetus tested and aborted if it has the problem. This is not something done (AFIK) for autism.

I don't want to spark a debate on abortion or eugenics, that is not my point.

Comment Re:blackouts, lack of channel choice, forced hardw (Score 1) 195

sports blackouts

OMG yes. I bought my wife an season pass because she loves watching baseball. What do you get for $109.99? Every game on TV except the ones in your home market. You can watch the Twins suck any time you want, so long as you don't live in Minnesota. Oh, and no postseason: that's a separate subscription.

Who the fuck came up with those ideas? I'll be damned if MLB ever gets another penny from us.

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