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Comment Re:FP becomes more popular than OOP? (Score 1) 415

The industry learned the hard way that OOP works well for some things but not others. For example, OOP has mostly failed in domain modeling (modeling real-world "nouns") but is pretty good at packaging API's for computing and networking services.

The industry may also learn the hard way where FP does well and where it chokes. Some understandably don't want to be the guinea pigs.

Comment Re:Functional Programming Considered Harmful (Score 1) 415

If you work on Chevies when everyone else is working on Fords, then you may have difficulty finding mechanics for your customized Chevies. I've yet to see evidence FP is objectively "better" in enough circumstances and niches to justify narrowing staffing options except for certain specialties. (I've complained about lack of practical demonstrations elsewhere on this story.)

Comment Re:Why is it wrong to care? (Score 1) 140

Hasn't the most militarily aggressive country done most of the Moon exploration to date?

Yes, but do you want the militarily aggressive that is for free speech and human rights or the one that is against it?

Though frankly the U.S. has toned down from the age of military drone strikes on weddings.

Also it's not like we mounted any weapons on the moon whereas the Chinese certainly would. Do you truly doubt that?

Comment Not any more (Score 3, Insightful) 140

I'm quoting you: "...repressive government and the wrongful imprisonment of dissenters".

As I seem to have to continually remind people on Slashdot, Hillary is not president.

Who exactly has Trump imprisoned wrongfully? Or are you saying it is wrong to imprison people who set cars on fire and loot shops? I know many on the left bellive this to be true but I had hoped that rot had not spread to the more rational denizens of Slashdot.

It's just their sheeple, drink the Kool-Aid given to them and think the other is more evil.

While that is indeed true of many Statists, it's not really true of the other more libertarian side of that equation - which only makes sense as the larger a government gets, the more unfeeling and cruel it becomes... so you can imagine what happens in essentially a world-wide government.

Comment Each of those lags in real value (Score 1) 185

So, if a CS degree is overrated

Which it is to some extent (I say that as a CS major).

I did find it useful and still find many of the concepts useful, plus I really enjoyed the courses. But the degree to which CS majors seem worshiped seems overmuch, or at least the degree to which non-CS majors are thought not to have the same skills seems overwrought. Non-CS majors can easily learn the aspects of CS that make a CS degree useful and give you a real-world advantage in the workplace. Think on it, what aspects of a CS degree are not able to be learned outside of college?

why isn't college in general overrated?

It is vastly overrated. If I were at an age to go to college today, I would elect to spend four years focusing self-study on a primary topic along with some kind of apprenticeship approach, or perhaps deep contribution to a set of open-source projects.

You could easily add in other aspects of study for rounding and spend vastly less than you would on a "real" college. Get a dirt cheap apartment around a college of your choice and you can enjoy all the social benefits with none of the massive debt.

why isn't high school overrated?

Public high school is not overrated, because the ratings are already horrendous. It certainly is not worth much currently, it serves mainly as a way to keep most kids off the streets for a number of hours per day. Far better to either go to a private school, some kind of charter school, or be homeschooled.

What you're saying is that education is pointless,

The actual thing he was saying is that EDUCATION is valuable, but you are only getting a real education to varying degrees from each of the steps you outlined.

Comment Why is it wrong to care? (Score 3, Interesting) 140

Trump, if we don't fund science, China will be #1 in RD

How is it not a problem if a repressive government gets ahead of the west in R&D? Do you like more, or less repressive government and the wrongful imprisonment of dissenters?

Trump, if we don't fund NASA, China will own the Moon!

Again, would you like a militarily aggressive force controlling the moon? That seems like a pretty valid concern for real, not just "a way to get Trump interested". In fact it's why Trump is already pretty interested in continuing NASA's work and why NASA didn't face any major budget cuts, in fact they increased planetary science spending, which is what you would hope from any rational president. We are all better off if a number of nations have operations on the moon, so we should figure out how to get more U.S. presence back on our nearest neighbor.

Comment Opposite Thought (Score 1) 188

People who can write interesting stuff are kicked out the door because they want actual creative control over what they write.
No amount of hiring people can fix that.

How is the answer not to hire the creative interesting people that were kicked out? Since they already hate the existing system it seems like they would no go with a strike - and all of the production that matters now (Netflix, Amazon) is giving creators creative control anyway.

Comment Re:High-brow fails [Re:It depends on the use] (Score 1) 415

Addendum and corrections:

The "actor model" seems pretty close to event driven programming. I don't know the official or exact difference. But my key point is that the event handling programming and interface is procedural. The only non-procedural aspect may be that requests for further actions may need a priority value (rank) and to be submitted to a request queue. For example, a game character may request a "shoot arrow" event on their part as a follow-up. But the event handler writer doesn't have to concern themselves with the direct management of the event-request-queue.

"Any more than...query writers...don't have to know..." should be "Any more than...query writers...have to know...". Remove "don't"

Comment Re:High-brow fails [Re:It depends on the use] (Score 1) 415

is more important now because of the trend towards more and more cores

But the bottleneck is not CPU itself for a good many applications. And specialized languages or sub-languages can handle much of the parallelism. If I ask a database to do a sort, it may use parallelism under the hood, but I don't have to micromanage that in most cases: I don't care if the sort algorithm uses FP or gerbils on treadmills. Similar with 3D rendering: the designer submits a 3D model with polygons and texture maps, and a rendering engine micromanages the parallelism under the hood. That "root engine" may indeed use FP, but the model maker doesn't have to know or care.

And event-driven programming can hide that fact that parallelism is going on, or at least provide a non-FP interface. For example, in a game, a character may be programmed by how they respond to various events. There may be 10 events going on at once, but the app dev is only focusing on one at a time per character or character type. Granted, it may take better languages or API's to abstract parallelism well. The "root engines" may make heavy use of FP, such as the database, rendering, and event handling engines, but the 2nd level, typically called "application developers", probably won't need that any more than SQL query writers (usually) don't have to know how the database engine was written. But only time will tell...

Comment Re:Makes sense (Score 1) 527

I know every generation thinks the young generation is lazy, etc., but there is real statistical evidence that the Millennial generation actually is starting to work much later. On a more anecdotal basis, I notice a very different approach to work in my kids (late teens, early 20s) and in their peers. My kids have always had to do chores and work around the house so I don't think that's the difference.

They do things like decide they're unhappy with their current employer so they just walk out, without trying to fix the problem and without trying to find another job first. I have never in my life quit a job before finding another, and it wouldn't even occur to me to do so. If my job sucks, by all means I'll make a move, but not until I have something else lined up. That's just one example, but it's typical of their whole approach. I suppose in some ways it's good to be more focused on quality of life and less on income... but not until you're safely self-sufficient.

It concerns me that I'm wandering into "get off my lawn!" territory here... but there really does seem to be a difference, a worrisome one.

Comment Re:EE Degree (Score 1) 185

For some reason, having an EE degree is considered the same (or for some people better, if you have software experience) than a CS degree, because supposedly I know how computers work at a gate level.

I have a physics degree, so supposedly I know how everything works ;) Most of my research/development work has been some kind of programming, but presumably that's how everything is done today. For example physics and chemistry simulations rather than lab work.

In my experience, one thing you get from advanced studies better than practical work is an abstract, systemic understanding of things. A way to look at the big picture and realize it's still only a special case of a humongous picture. For example, after studying functional analysis at the math department, I've been much more comfortable using functions to manipulate functions.

Comment Plane Truth [Re:Why??] (Score 1) 224

who invented flight thing over again, they will just keep on redefining what flight is until they are first.

Not comparable to this situation per sister message, but as far as the first manned plane flight, the definition matters because it was relatively trivial to attach a motor to a propeller and then to a thing with wings and lunge sky-ward for a short period of time. After all, gliders, as in hang-gliders, were already common by then.

One could argue it was really an evolution, but the Wright Brothers were way ahead of the others in terms of control for several years regardless of who made the first lunge into the air. They were doing figure-8's when others could barely turn.

They finally lost that distinction when others moved and perfected the "tail" on the back instead of the front, which made planes safer.

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