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Submission + - First New US Nuclear Reactor In 20 Years Goes Live (

An anonymous reader writes: The Tennessee Valley Authority is celebrating an event 43 years in the making: the completion of the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant. In 1973, the TVA, one of the nation's largest public power providers, began building two reactors that combined promised to generate enough power to light up 1.3 million homes. The first reactor, delayed by design flaws, eventually went live in 1996. Now, after billions of dollars in budget overruns, the second reactor has finally started sending power to homes and businesses. Standing in front of both reactors Wednesday, TVA President Bill Johnson said Watts Bar 2, the first US reactor to enter commercial operation in 20 years, would offer clean, cheap and reliable energy to residents of several southern states for at least another generation. Before Watts Bar 2, the last time an American reactor had fired up was in 1996. It was Watts Bar 1--and according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, it cost $6.8 billion, far greater than the original price tag at $370 million. In the 2000s, some American power companies, faced with growing environmental regulations, eyed nuclear power again as a top alternative to fossil fuels such as coal and oil. A handful of companies, taking advantage of federal loan guarantees from the Bush administration, revived nuclear reactor proposals in a period now known as the so-called "nuclear renaissance." Eventually, nuclear regulators started to green light new reactors, including ones in Georgia and South Carolina. In 2007, the TVA resumed construction on Watts Bar 2, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency. The TVA originally said it would take five years to complete. The TVA, which today serves seven different southern states, relies on nuclear power to light up approximately 4.5 million homes. Watts Bar 2, the company's seventh operating reactor, reaffirms its commitment to nukes for at least four more decades, Johnson said Wednesday. In the end, TVA required more than five years to build the project. The final cost, far exceeding its initial budget, stood at $4.7 billion.

Submission + - ICANN recommends TLDs like .txt -- and .exe (

fyngyrz writes: ICANN says, in part:

Given preliminary feedback that there is not a technical need to prevent file extensions as TLDs, as well as the lack of an authoritative source of common file extensions to draw from, staff determined that it is not workable to prevent common file extensions from being used as TLDs.

To summarize, it is the recommendation of the ICANN technical staff to allow applications for TLD strings that may also be commonly used for file extensions.

But will ICANN approve such applications? If so, we can all look forward to opportunities to click on...


Comment Re:So it appears . . . (Score 1) 169

OK, but you won't like it. That will mean the software doesn't release until the lead programmer says so. No ifs ands or buts. If management presses too hard on that issue, THEY go to jail. Expect prices to get a lot higher and development time to multiply. Provide a high quality hardware platform or no go. No substituting hardware later or you invalidate the sign-off. Expect to have a computer dedicated to that application and that application only. Be sure to get any thing added to the LAN approved...

Comment Re:Your car is not your car (Score 1) 273

...and the "cloud" -- if it's in the "cloud", someone else owns it. Even when they tell you you own it.

It's not on your hardware, it's not on your software, it's not in your storage, it's not on your premises, and you have zero control over any of the actual foregoing locations / instances.

But hey, everyone, keep that cloud-ward stampede going. They love ya for it.

Comment Tesla has control (Score 1) 273

All they could do to stop you from doing is voiding your warranty.

Perhaps not. As I understand it, the car is connected in order to facilitate software upgrade / maintainance. So they could tell the car it couldn't drive the next time you parked it for ten minutes, for instance.

I imagine that would land them in court -- but technically speaking, they could do it.

Comment Re:Kinda makes you wonder... (Score -1) 66

If you think it's there to protect the computer and OS you are horribly uneducated about it.

It's there to protect the precious software IP from dirty evil YOU. so you cant disable DRM and make a copy.

That is the only reason this crap exists in modern processors. Intel is King of DRM and they are trying to keep it that way.

Comment Re: Windows 10 is possibly the worst spyware ever (Score 1) 284

If it makes Windows solid, with no crashes and spyware? Sure bring it on, can't be any worse than what Google and Apple are doing.

And if you are saying this "cuz Linux" I honestly do not care, Linux can DIAF because for 20+ damned years we have watched the Linux community fuck themselves up and shoot themselves in the face over and over AND OVER with one dumb as fuck move after another. I swear after dealing with Linux for the better part of a decade I am now sure its run from bizzaroland, where the devs go "quick things am starting to get stable and users am happy! We must rip out major subsystem so the OS is sent backwards half a decade and will take years just to get back to where it was, then users will feel they am 'leet' if they can just get the thing to run! Aren't we am smart?"

So at this point I have zero fucks to give, if Billy came back and put out an OS that run was well as XP X64 or Win 7 X64? He could be as big a douchenozzle as he wanted, I have zero doubt you'd have hundreds of millions lining up to sing his praises after 3 stinkers in a row. Again couldn't be any worse than Google with their rigging search results to support their political investments and putting more and more APIs behind the Playwall or Apple hiring companies to make its products that treat workers so badly they had to put suicide nets outside the factories to keep visitors from being hit by falling workers.

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