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Comment Re:Burn in... Improvements? (Score 1) 238

how does the TV know the content was originally 1080p24? If you do inverse telecine on stuff which was originally recorded live interlaced you won't get very good results.

It's very easy for a filter to try reassembling fields into frames, then checking if they match, and perhaps outputting the interlaced fields to the next filter unmodified if they do not.

The pulldown pattern of duplicate fields is quite uniform and consistent, with the exception of the occasional edit, so it's obvious after just a few frames if your guess was wrong.

Comment Re:There's a Practical Charging Limit (Score 1) 198

A Gallon of gasoline is estimated to have 33.41 KwH! (A normal gas engine throws a good portion of that energy away as heat.) That gallon of gas is pretty close to what my typical household uses in the entire day for electricity! So to pull down the equivalent of a couple of gallons of gas in 20 minutes is going to take the equivalent power drain of a sub-station transformer.

That's some very bald-faced lying.

You already said that the theoretical energy of a tank of gasoline is mostly wasted, but then you go on to use that same number anyhow, as if EVs must waste just as much energy, for some reason. In fact electric motors and Li-Ion batteries are very efficient, while gasoline engines are very inefficient, so the numbers.

In fact a Tesla Model S battery ranges from 60-100 kWh depending on how much you spend, so your gas tank is only 2-3 gallons of theoretical gasoline, while still transporting you 300 miles.

A 60kWh charge in 20 minutes would be no problem for businesses. It's only 375A@480V (3-phase). Here's what 1200 amp, 3-phase electrical service looks like:
http://www.pesnj.com/uploads/2...
Does that look like a "sub-station transformer" to you?

A typical house doesn't use a 480 volt industrial power feed. You don't want much more current in the hands of consumers.

Why in the world would you need 20 minute charging AT HOME? What kind of emergency would necessitate that? Two people sharing a car, both commuting 100+ miles to work, on different shifts?

Most everyone else plugs-in their car, then GOES TO SLEEP. Who cares whether it charges in 10 minutes, or 10 hours, AT HOME?

Comment Re:Cold weather? (Score 1) 198

Our car batteries get a little cranky w/o either a trickle changer or a battery pad warmer at those temperatures.

Car starter batteries do terribly in cold weather because they are expected to deliver a huge percentage of their power in a few seconds, when cold. An EV will have a huge battery pack, which is only expected to output a small percentage of its available power gradually over the course of your drive.

In short, you'll have less range when the batteries are cold, but they will always work just fine (no start-up problems), and you might even see your range increase while you drive, as the batteries heat-up from being discharged.

And like you said, all cars in cold climates are pluged-in anyhow, so there's really no extra hassle to worry about, and they can be kept in ideal operating temperatures with inexpensive grid power.

Comment Re:Autonomous Date (Score 1) 198

Those "parlour tricks" do a pretty good job of driving already, another 4 years of machine learning and I think they'll do a stupendous job.

Autonomous cars did a pretty good job of driving a decade ago, too. I'm sure they'll do a pretty good job a decade from now, as well, but like today, still not be quite good enough.

Google's self-driving cars have reported higher incidents of accidents than human drivers, and most of them are limited to low-speeds, and still need human operators to occasionally get them out of trouble.

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