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Comment Re: CEOs are smarter than anyone (Score 1) 178

Bingo. All of the new and exciting developments of the last decade have been in machine learning tasks. That says nothing about generalization. What we're developing are very efficient tools to accomplish new tasks, but those tools have precisely zero skill in the cleverness department. It's so common for people to forget this fundamental distinction that there's a term for what happens when they remember it. AI research has its own genre of tech bubbles caused by overoptimistic futurists.

Comment Re:I remember the same predictions about Amazon (Score 1) 298

Yes, I agree. I had no idea how Amazon would still be around today "back then."

While I certainly how no idea how big they would get, I was pretty quickly convinced they'd be around for the long haul because they were pouring money left and right into infrastructure. While the rest of the bubble industry was buying $1000 chairs and throwing $2000/head parties - Amazon was buying land and building warehouses and distribution centers.

I only wish I hadn't talked myself into selling my shares when they went past $100 a few years back.

Comment Re:/. editors: why do you maintain this shit hole? (Score 4, Interesting) 1081

Donald Trump broke this place.

Not really, no. /. used to be mostly liberal/libertarian with a large slice of middle-of-the-road. Rightwing nutjobs, facists, and Nazis-in-all-but-name used to be downmodded into oblivion within minutes of posting.

Then Gamergate happened.

Within a few months, /. culture was almost completely inverted - and the rightwing nutjobs, facists, and Nazis-in-all-but-name gained ascendance. Things have only gotten worse since then.

Comment Re:And you should learn to read before replying. (Score 1) 150

I guess you missed where he clearly stated that it was the post office (specifically, Deutsche Post) which was responsible for the manner in which the packages were taped together, not the sendor *or* the recipient.

I guess you missed the part where the sender did a crappy job of packaging - and the Deutsche Post had to do the best they could with the pile of shit he dropped on their counter.

Comment Re:Practical? (Score 1) 142

CPU time is perfectly well defined, though only really meaningful in terms of absolute value if you also give the relevant CPU you're talking about (obviously, 1 hour on a 386 and 1 hour on a modern Xeon are orders of magnitude difference levels of computation). Incidentally, they don't give the CPU used for the attack, as due to the fact they used cloud infrastructure the CPU time was spread over many different kinds of CPUs, but their "average CPU" unit reference is a 2.3Ghz Xeon E5-2650v3 (and for GPUs, they again used a spread of kinds, but they give the number of 114 years of device time for a cluster of K20s).

Comment Re:Time for USPS to sue him for defamation (Score -1, Troll) 150

USPS DID loose the package!

They they also lose your elementary school text books in transit right at that critical moment when your teacher was trying to get you to understand the difference between "loose" and "lose?"

the box was sitting in a Atlanta for over a month

Which was probably the same week when you'd have been learning about using "an" in front of words that start with vowels, though that still doesn't help that sentence make any more sense. An Atlanta what?

the recipient who's address is on the box

The recipient who is address on the box? Or did you mean "whose?"

It's getting pretty bad out there. It's a good thing people are spending thousands of dollars and hours reviving old 8-bit video games! Whew!

Comment Re:My job... (Score 1) 359

Maybe once angry displaced workers start attacking and killing robots I'll have the same reaction.

Waaaay to late on that score. The legend goes, the term "sabotage" comes from workers in the Industrial Revolution throwing their wooden shoes (called "sabots") into the machines which were replacing them.

Comment Re:motivation (Score 1) 192

Yeah, he'll never get around, for example, to orders reducing regulatory burdens. Oh, right! Already done. Or any movement at all to start to undo the financial stranglehold that Obamacare has put onto people forced to fear IRS enforcement if they don't go broke buying insurance they can't use ... oh, right! Already done, with more under way. I guess we could run down the long list, but you already know it and you're pretending you don't so you can engage in more lefty denialism. Carry on! It obviously is your coping mechanism.

Comment Re:motivation (Score 1) 192

Hey, look! Somebody with reading comprehension and cognitive problems attempting to spin something in a childish way, and feeling smug! Which is exactly how the Democrats managed their last several elections, resulting in the loss of over 1000 legislative seats, both houses of congress, the White House, and the Supreme Court. But please, carry on! That would be awesome. Thanks.

Comment Re:First amendment ? WTH ? (Score 2) 116

The problem with their logic is, of course, that the police aren't forcing anyone to buy an Alexa device.

o.0 That's not a problem with their logic - that's something utterly irrelevant that you've pulled out of thin air.
 

If I choose to purchase a device that, by design, records everything I say, then I've voluntarily sacrificed my right to privacy in exchange for the benefits afforded by the device.

That's an assertion on your part, not a fact.
 

It's not the police's fault that I've done so, and they're entirely within their rights to seek a warrant for the information that I've served up on a platter.

Yes... and no. The police certainly are within their rights to seek a warrant to obtain information so long as is it relative to the case. They may not however use warrants to conduct fishing expeditions on the off-chance that information might be found that might be relevant to the case. Though they phrase it in First Amendment terms, that's the heart of Amazon's argument - they police have not established that the recordings are material to the case, and thus have no legal right to make a blanket request for private information.

Comment Re:motivation (Score -1, Troll) 192

What happens is that when people don't get punished for the first few things, they start to realize that the normal limits don't apply, and the bad sorts start pushing the envelope. Eventually ...

... eventually you get Hillary Clinton in control of the Democrat party and being presumed to be the next president. But pendulum does always swing the other way. This sort of thing could easily damage Uber's reputation and user base, in a significant way, at the retail level. Just like with the election, people vote with their feet, especially when it's so easy to just go somewhere else (Lyft, etc).

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