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Comment Re:Did someone say bubble!? (Score 1) 267

Not every cycle is a bubble. A boom followed by a crash is a bubble, but a boom followed by a slow reverse isn't. The housing crisis was a bubble because it was built on banker fraud. The increase in housing prices in the '80s was new plateau, with localized crash in Texas, from a "crisis" identical to the later global housing/lending crisis, just localized to Texas, centered around fraud related to land valuations. If the "crash" is a slowing of housing cost growth, then it was never a bubble.

housing *always* goes up. There are more people tomorrow than there were yesterday, so demand is going up, but there's no new land.

Comment Re:I hope he wins his suit (Score 1) 220

If you have a doctorate in Underwater Basketweaving, and stand up when the pilot on your flight asks for a doctor, should you be jailed or fined for that?

The professional organizations are stifling speech. They should only be able to limit speech on a subset of words. "I'm a physician" is different than "I'm a doctor". Just like "I'm a PE" is different than "I'm an engineer."

Comment Re:I hope he wins his suit (Score 1) 220

An engineer is someone who a received an engineering degree from an academic institution.

Or has passed as a journeyman in an engineering guild, like e.g. clock makers. However, there are precious few engineering guilds left in the world.

(And, of course, those responsible for the engine on a train or boat, but that's a different kind of engineer.)

Comment Re:And the moral of the story is... (Score 1) 220

In the UK, "electrical engineer" means "electrician" in American English. In all English speaking countries outside the US, "engineer" means "someone that makes something". In many cases, "Engineer" outside the US means "metalworker" or "mechanic" in US speak. The engineering boards don't persecute people for using the term loosely. In the US, the term is abused by the boards. PE should have a meaning. "engineer" shouldn't. It literally means someone that builds, maintains, or operates an "engine". So every car driver is, by language definitions, an "engineer". Though the engineering societies in the US have managed to get laws passed that re-writes the language.

And yes, that's a US-only phenomenon. If you claim PE status outside the US, the punishment is the same or worse than in the US, but "engineer" holds a special meaning in the US and only the US.

You shouldn't talk about other countries, since it looks like you've never visited any.

Comment Re:Sigh (Score 1) 160

God knows how much electric 100,000 fast-charging stations pull. I doubt it's any more environmentally friendly than even 100,000 petrol cars.

Yes, supercharging is much worse for the environment than regular charging. The grids don't deliver enough juice for them at peak, and they have to store energy locally in battery buffers. That's another quite lossy conversion. And supercharging isn't as energy efficient in itself either - the heat loss is larger than with slower charging.
In countries that produce a good part of the electricity from coal and oil, that's not a good thing.

Comment Re:Designed in the US, produced elsewhere (Score 1) 76

Ok, we design things in California.

Often that design process is that a US company contacts a design company in Taiwan, which produces a bespoke design for which the real designer will not claim rights to. It's then "Designed in the USA", because someone in the US approved and paid for the design.

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