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Comment Re:It gives me pleasure to introuce you to the fut (Score 0, Troll) 72

The apologists will, as always, talk only about the benefits and how it will help against the "bad guys"

Why should someone apologize for telling the truth? If it was your job to deal with an armed, violent person, and you were handed a tool that allows you to do that with less of a chance of you being killed while doing your job, are you really saying you wouldn't use that tool? Let me guess, you think it's unfair for the police to wear body armor, right? Yeah. Right.

Took less than 2 hours for the AC to be shown to be correct.

Comment Re:Who should we blame? (Score 1) 112

The people that did it.

Certainly, but they had help. Not surprised at this point, but somehow still disappointed to find no mention of "Microsoft", "liability", or even "blame" (beyond the titular question).

If there were liability for the customers' harm, then the makers would design and implement hardware and software with more concern about security and abuse. Not saying Microsoft invented the idea of avoiding responsibility (and actually unable to think of anything that Microsoft actually did invent), but they perfected it. Thereby Microsoft became rich and successful and the model for other companies. Latest reports are pointing the fingers at Chinese manufacturers, but they just sold what the customers wanted, secure in the legal protection of "You can't sue us no matter how much harm our devices cause."

Oh well. Pointless to spend more thought or time on Slashdot these days, especially in speculating on possible improvements. This article will disappear in a few hours, but maybe I missed something "funny"... Okay, found the only post with a funny mod, and it wasn't. Not surprised.

Comment Re:I say BS (Score 3, Informative) 121


And I'm telling you that lithium-ion batteries are not a "single tech", that they've dramatically improved in power and energy density (both volumetric and gravimetric) over time. And if you doubt this, I repeat: go find and older lithium-ion battery and compare it to a new one.

As for li-air, yes, the maximum energy density of li-air is about 10x of the maximum of li-ion. Namely because it works by direct oxidation rather than intercalation, so you don't need the mass of the matrix into which the ions get intercalated. It is not a "magical tech". It exists. Like all technologies in all fields, however, you have to reach production specs. This means not only maintaining a combination of safety, reliability, longevity, efficiency, temperature range, power density (charge and discharge) and energy density, but also affordability in mass production. And to be able to guarantee that you can do all of these things to a high enough level for investors to take the risk.

As with all technologies, you start out with promise in one or two fields, but serious problems in many others that you have to deal with. With time you refine them, until all of refined to a state where the product is commercialized. Li-air has actually been advancing quite well. In the early days one of its biggest problems were efficiency and longevity, but they've made huge strides in both in recent years. Lithium sulfur still looks nearer term, but commercialization of Li-air appears to have gone from "possible" to "quite probable".

Comment Re:Halfway There (Score 2) 375

Right. Out of the 330 million people in the US (not counting the broader market, there's "nobody" who wants a gun that can't be accidentally picked up and used by their young children or an intruder. Literally "nobody". Yeah, totally believe you.

They have a niche. You want to prevent them from filling it.

Comment Re:Progress! (Score 4, Interesting) 121

Actually, that is a concern. Li-ion batteries don't have lithium metal in them unless something goes wrong. Lithium-air batteries always have lithium metal in them, by design.

In practice, you'll probably see a bit of the energy density given up in order to beef up the casing to prevent rupture/fire.

Thankfully, lithium-sulfur batteries don't use lithium metal, just lithium polysulfides. The max energy density isn't as high, but it's still quite good. They're already on the market, albeit in small quantities for applications that require the absolute highest rechargeable energy density (mainly aerospace).

Comment Re:I say BS (Score 2) 121

Yes, cue the standard "Batteries haven't advanced!" stuff from people carrying around cell phones with significantly more amp hours in a smaller battery profile than the last generation phones that they owned.

News flash: every time a new tech advance makes it into a product, they don't mail a letter about it to everybody who read an article about it years earlier. Example: hey, remember all of that stuff about breakthroughs in silicon anodes several years back? Yeah, they're in batteries now. Even Tesla is starting to use it in their higher-end packs.

Comment Re:67% is not that good (Score 1) 125

It's good for the NAO. When you're pushing the boundaries, anything over 50% is good.

For long-term climate models, things like the NAO average out across many years. For short-term weather forecasting, you have a week or more before the system diverges enough to cease to be useful. But it's tougher working on those in-between scales.

Comment Re:No it can't (Score 1) 125

Should be well worth it in terms of things like planning for agricultural products, natural gas supplies, etc.

The real issue however is that they've validated it with hindcasting. Which is certainly something, but isn't as ideal as you'd want. It's trivially easy to fit any arbitrary past dataset to a statistical model if you have enough parameters that can be tweaked, but that doesn't mean that you're actually capturing the underlying dynamics. That said, from the sound of it it's built around a physical model, so that increases the odds that it actually is, rather than just fitting to some arbitrary curve.

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