Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. Also, Slashdot's Facebook page has a chat bot now. Message it for stories and more. ×

Comment Re:"borrow money to make it through the month" (Score 1) 566

Of course, if you're willing to have employees that work remotely, then your talent pool is the entire world rather than one small geographical area. And somewhere like the Bay Area without the ability to hire remote workers also locks you out of a lot of talent: i.e. all of the ones able to do basic arithmetic and realise that they won't have any financial security if they move to the Bay Area and work for a company that has a 50+% chance of not existing in a year's time (i.e. any startup).

Comment Re:Don't buy what you can't afford. 3,500feet, $24 (Score 1) 566

And the important corollary: look at cost of living before you negotiate a salary. If the employer isn't willing to pay you what you need for a comfortable cost of living, then run. You're obviously not valuable to them, so you'll likely be the first to be let go and you'll find it hard to get the next job after that.

Comment Re: Poor on $100k? Sure (Score 1) 566

It depends a bit. There's a trade for the management between salary costs and control. You can give someone a 20-50% pay cut when they move out of the bay area and they'll still have more take-home pay and a higher standard of living. It's increasingly hard for middle management to justify to senior management why they're not doing that. That said, the bay area situation is great for consultants living in places with a sane cost of living. When I was doing that, my contracting rate was lower than a salaried employee in the bay area, yet I was able to cover my cost of living and pay off my mortgage quickly if I worked two days a month. Anything beyond that built up a buffer in savings in case I wasn't able to get work for an extended period.

Comment Re:Poor on $100k? Sure (Score 1) 566

Buy a bread machine. It takes about 1-2 minutes to load it, wait a couple of hours and you have a loaf of bread that will last about a week and is about a quarter of the price in ingredients of an equally nice store-bought one. The bread machine has some capital costs, but mine is about 10 years old and still works fine, so it amortises well.

Comment Re:Drone collisions... (Score 1) 52

Yeah, that's pretty much how I interpreted it as well.

(The bipe pilot turned on his smoke to "increase his visibility to the R/C airplane operators". Uh-huh -- *he was showing off*, and got too close.)

That said, the FAA's decision was pretty clear -- the collision was the fault of the pilot of the model aircraft. I guess that's the only possible answer given their rules -- showing off is permitted, but hovering where a manned aircraft decides to be is not, permission or not.

Comment Re: Taste Score (Score 2) 87

Liver tastes like something that spent a lifetime filtering out crap for a reason, kidneys taste like they've been marinated in piss, etc).

Organ meats contain the highest nutritional value, actually.

These statements are not mutually exclusive. Organ meats have a high chance of contamination from environmental sources because of their function. If clean, they are highly desirable. If not, you should leave them to the sled dogs. They have shorter lifespans, and are less likely to suffer the effects of bioaccumulation.

Comment Re:...and lunges at you (Score 2) 54

I can just imagine some rogue programmer installing the following on it:

1) As big of a battery pack as it can carry as "payload", strapped to its back.
2) Facial recognition software that measures the number of and distance to any people recorded by its camera
3) Modern neural net, trained by being rewarded when the actions it takes lead to 1) it approaching other people, and 2) people fleeing from it.

' ... and then setting it loose in the streets.

Comment Re:we can't even be bothered to get that right.... (Score 2) 127

Another option apart from orbit is going to L2 and back, if they want to basically "hover" with the moon blocking the Earth, right on the cusp of drifting away from the Earth-Moon system and into a free orbit around the sun. They'd be the first people ever to go there. It's 3.5km/s outbound, 0.6km/s back. Or if they want a long-duration stay (~100d) they can get back by the interplay of the Sun-Earth-Moon system for only 0.1 km/s (in the process going way far away from Earth).. There's probably some such returns with intermediary dV and durations as well.

But obviously a free return trajectory is the lowest energy. If I recall correctly Apollo's burn was ~3.2 km/s

Comment Re:The sharing of table scraps economy not viable? (Score 1) 317

Done it on a few cars, Civic, Mustang. The worst are A arms. Two bushings, in line.

Yes, that sounds like a massive PITA. I have no experience with such things. I actually let someone change my Dana 50 ball joints, the same guy doing the alignment on my F250. On my 240SX, all the suspension links were just simple stamped steel items with one thing on each end, maybe a bolt attachment in the middle (e.g. radius rod to the front suspension arm.) The bushing in the radius rod is about the size of a subframe bushing on a german luxo barge, i.e. massive. So that's going to basically last forever. On my A8, it's all cast Aluminum members, and it's all multilink so they are all simple except the main one on the bottom to which the goodies attach. So there are just no situations like that. On the other hand, there's also not a complete kit of poly bushings available for either end of the car. There's only one poly bush shy in the front, but I think there's only one bush available for the rear. On the 240SX at least you could go full-poly, except maybe the subframe where people tended to go Aluminum anyway. And I lost track of the number of Integras I blew off due to handling differences, so meh to Honda :) I went full poly front and full spherical rear, though... And kept rubber subframe bushes for street comfort.

Comment The *real* question... (Score 1) 44

The real question here, which shouldn't even need to be asked but does...

Which of these plans is the least-limited version of "unlimited"? I've already discovered that Verizon won't offer their plan for 4G access points (even though I can buy a five year old sacrificial phone and tether to it 24/7). AT&T apparently doesn't allow tethering at all (which I thought the FCC had previously spanked them for, but, no surprise they went for a "Hail Mary" pass after this past January).

So, which of these plans really will let you use it as close to unlimited as possible? I have no delusion any of them will actually give me the upper possible limit of a solid 42.8Mbps for 13TB/month, but will any even realistically let me use 3-5Mbps sustained for a few hours a day, with 50+GB/month total?

Comment Re:Lottery? (Score 1) 127

Is there a legal reason SpaceX can't have a lottery for tickets? Seems like a good way to fund these types of things.

Well what do you do if you don't sell all the lottery tickets, is the lottery stuck? Normally the prize pool is relative to the total paid in, but either you get a seat or you don't. Also you might end up with people that for medical or mental reasons shouldn't be trapped in a tiny little space capsule for a week with no chance of assistance, sure you can disqualify them in the terms and conditions but the whole "my number came up, but I was refused" bit would be negative PR. And it's just one lucky winner, in a regular lottery people like to win a little now and then while they hope for the jackpot. The rest will really be trinkets by comparison.

And I think this is still just a joyride, not a life changer. You take a fling around the moon and then you're right back to where you were, sure it's for space nerds but hardly the mass market appeal an ordinary lottery has. I think it would be totally different if it were say a ticket to Mars. That's the kind of thing you could probably make a living off afterwards, just from selling interviews and speaking engagements and such. Then again you'd probably want to be more selective in the selection process so... I mean it would be cool, but I understand why SpaceX wouldn't do it. And it's easy to get their lottery confused with (semi-?)scams like Mars One.

Slashdot Top Deals

/* Halley */ (Halley's comment.)

Working...