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Comment Re:Ahh, the good ole' days... (Score 1) 269

The first thing I usually saw fail was the power supply (or at very least it would need some after-market cooling, like a tiny fan).

But yeah, the core processor stuff was crazy durable. I guess that makes sense when you imagine what it looks like compared to a modern processor - with oceans of empty space between every gargantuan wire and transistor.

Comment Re:Something deeper.. (Score 0) 459

> Companies should have the right to pick whoever they want whatever method they please.

I bet you think you sound intelligent when you say that, keepin' it real, being objective, and everything. "Life should be a meritocracy!" screams person who is too unfamiliar with history to notice how humans have never achieved a meritocracy in societies with zero laws barring discrimination throughout history. But if you spend two seconds thinking about it, what you're saying is fucking dumb. Companies can pick whoever they want so long as they obey the law, one of which is not discriminating against gender, race, and other factors, because to let them pick whoever they want would be stupid enough to think that a "leave the companies alone" market discourages or prevents discrimination. Never has, never will.

Comment Re:The poor economics of flying cars (Score 1) 134

I agree with your conclusion - I don't think we're going to see personal flying transport anytime soon - but I think you're exaggerating the case against.

The energy requirements to get something the weight of a human aloft are considerable

It actually isn't that much energy to get a human being up 100 ft (humans are light, and transportation is already very energy expensive) nor does it necessarily take a ton of energy to keep them there. Physics has no problem with (just as an example off the top of my head, not actually practical) a mass transit system made out of escalators and gliders. There's no absolute reasons such a system would take a ton of energy, be all that expensive, or even require bonkers infrastructure; it's just nobody has a plan to do it that would practically work.

So yeah, I think it's silly to imagine huge fleets of conventional VTOL aircraft - but I don't think there's good reason to write all this off as permanently impossible or something, it just needs more creativity than this plan has.

Comment Re:Connectng (Score 1) 76

Your front door can be broken into. Yet you still lock it, because doors are useful and the pragmatic likelihood that somebody will break down your door is a lot lower than somebody walking into it unlocked. The real question I have to wonder if what do hackers have to gain from hacking a car? If the barrier to entry is high enough, there are plenty of easier ways of causing people harm, stealing the car, or whatever other police-procedural fantasy crime you can think of.

Comment Re:bad? (Score 1) 76

If you ask the "right" people, apparently the barn has been "fully engulfed and about to collapse" for thousands of years now. Shit happens, we fix the shit, and try to get it as right going forward as is reasonably possible. The way people talk, it's like some kind of massive collective failure that will bring about the end of days *any day now* that humans are not perfect.

Comment Re:they also found... (Score 1) 314

Blacks are far more likely to be criminals because they are discriminated against even before they get into the judicial system. If a teacher decides she doesn't like black kids, and puts them in detention more, would you say it is correct to state, "Black kids are far more likely to misbehave?" While you may think you've just stated a fact, unless you place it within the context of the unequal treatment to begin with, you're simply perpetuating a stereotype that is untrue (blacks are far more likely to be bad people than whites.)

Comment On VR.. (Score 1) 82

The last point, VR, is also the one place where the grandparent post is probably right. I expect a good percentage of PSVR games to get PC ports, if only because they'll need to hit as much of the small VR market as they can.

PSVR is also likely to be terrible, perhaps bad enough that it may sabotage the whole VR market. Even with a monstrous computer that far outperforms anything the PS4 is going to do, VR presents real challenges to developers. Console developers are going to have to juice visuals for 2d trailers, and end up with a barf-fest in 3d.

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