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Comment Jail time for a vegetable garden; bus hours (Score 1) 164

because they can't comprehend making their own food

That or they can comprehend being threatened with imprisonment when city codes ban gardens.

or exercising without equipment

That depends on weather and on how strict the local police are about giving children priority on public playgrounds.

or getting around without a taxi.

What should they do instead? Ride the bus? Buses in my home town don't operate at night, on Sundays, or on major holidays. Under the "employment at will" principle widespread in the United States, employers can and do exercise their rights to fire employees for notifying them that they aren't available at those times. Many, such as Walmart, also have a "must be available on weekends" policy of refusing to hire applicants who mark down that they aren't available on Sunday.

Comment When cable TV (Score 1) 164

83% of American households have some form of subscription television service.

And they pay negative dollars per month for this service. Many local cable companies charge less for a bundle of Internet access and the lowest tier of subscription television service (local channels, C-SPAN, public access, and home shopping) than for Internet access alone.

3-4 months of that would cover at least enough of a mid market law firms time to assess the merits of case.

3 to 4 months of negative? Or are you implying that Internet access is not a necessity to find and/or keep a job?

We also have these things called public libraries were ordinary citizens like you or I could get access to either online resources

Good luck with that when the public library has closed for the night or for the weekend by the time you would have arrived there from work.

Comment Publishers unwilling to grant a license (Score 1) 77

The Wii used inaccurate software emulation

How do you know Nintendo's forthcoming $60 console doesn't also "use inaccurate software emulation"? Until it ships, nobody will have opened it up to look (except for parties to Nintendo's non-disclosure agreement).

and allow people to buy games for a $1 or $2

and didn't have access to the entire NES library.

Not all third-party publishers of NES games are willing to "allow people to buy games for a $1 or $2". When Nintendo announced Virtual Console for the first time, it mentioned Tetris as one of the games it probably wouldn't be able to license at fair market value.* Or for those third-party games whose copyright owner is unwilling, are you recommending that Nintendo lobby national governments to just take a license under eminent domain?

The Wii did not have a NES controller.

The controller bundled with Nintendo's forthcoming $60 console is compatible with Wii.

* Not counting Tetris Party on WiiWare, which was years later, twice as expensive as NES VC games, and broken in the same way as most other Tetris games since 2001.

Comment Re:Stagnant? (Score 1) 139

I was just looking at this article which points out that Apple's R&D has gone up many times over since Job's passed on...

The thing is, that's usually a bad sign. It means that your development teams are growing very quickly, which has two effects:

  • The median age/experience level drops precipitously, resulting in poorer output quality.
  • The amount of effort required to maintain the products designed by more people grows by the square of the number of people involved.

Eventually you reach a point where every additional person makes the product worse or more delayed, rather than better or faster. These days, I keep getting the feeling that Apple passed that point a while back, and they just haven't noticed yet. This is one reason why innovative ideas almost invariably come from small companies, not big ones.

The other reason is that the larger Apple grows, the harder it will be to innovate, because the breakage caused by doing so will become an ever bigger problem as the code base increases in size. At some point, it will be necessary for Apple to start over from scratch—probably by buying a company that creates some innovative alternative. At that point, it will have fully become Microsoft or IBM. And that's okay. Eventually, somebody else will come along and become the next Apple. It's the circle of life.

Comment Re:Sterilized long ago (Score 2) 189

In our solar system only moons are tidally locked to planets, but no planets to stars.

Mercury comes pretty close with its 3:2 spin-orbit resonance. It spins 3 times for every 2 orbits. That's close enough to being tidally locked that the difference is mostly moot from a "cooked on one side" perspective.

Comment Re:uranium runs out (Score 2) 309

Good catch. Thorium can't be used to produce weaponizable plutonium. My recollection is:

P-239 is weapons-grade plutonium.

U-238 is weapons-grade uranium.

P-238 is an alpha emitter, degrading to U-234(5?) (i.e. it skips U-238).

Thorium produces P-238 (and not P-239/U-238), so it is not useful for nuclear fission weapons.

In any case, I recall back in the debate about uranium or thorium reactors, DoD refused to produce Thorium precisely because they cannot be used to produce nuclear weapons.

Comment Next up... (Score 1) 145

Coming next: Facebook tests out modal popup windows as a means of delivering the content - aka ads - people really want to see, rather than wasting their time taking them directly to things like profiles, pictures, or their wall.

And as a bonus, pop-under porn ads, so you can enjoy one last bit of joy from Facebook while desperately trying to close out of your browser as the boss approaches.

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