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Comment Stupid article (Score 1) 73

Satellite pagers (and in more modern times, texts over the cellular network) are the most reliable way to get alarms out to field and on-call personal. Sure, someone could send a malicious fake page or text, but these alarms are mainly just heads-up to personal who are not in the operations center that something is amis. The main board will always be checked / personal will always call in and double check before anyone actually pushes any buttons.

This is a really stupid article.



Benchmark Battle October 2016: Chrome Vs. Firefox Vs. Edge ( 130

Krystalo quotes a report from VentureBeat: It's been more than a year since our last browser benchmark battle, and the competition remains fierce. Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, and Microsoft Edge have all gained a variety of new features and improvements over the past year. It's time to see if any of them have managed to pull ahead of the pack. It appears that Edge has made the biggest gains since last year. That said, browser performance is improving at a very rapid pace, and it shouldn't be your only consideration when picking your preferred app for consuming Internet content. You can click on individual tests below to see the details:

SunSpider: Edge wins!
Octane: Edge wins!
Kraken: Chrome wins!
JetStream: Edge wins!
Oort Online: Firefox wins!
Peacekeeper: Firefox wins!
WebXPRT: Edge wins!
HTML5Test: Chrome wins!

You can also read all about the setup used for the benchmark tests here. VentureBeat used a custom desktop PC, featuring an Intel Core i5 4440 processor (6M Cache, 3.10 GHz), 8GB of DDR3 1600MHz RAM, a 500GB SATA hard drive (7200 RPM), an Nvidia GeForce GTX 460 graphics card, and a 24-inch widescreen LED monitor (1920 x 1080).
Desktops (Apple)

It Looks Like Apple is Killing the Physical Esc and Power Keys On New MacBook Pro 491

Curious minds on the internet have uncovered an image file on their Mac, which was added by Apple in the latest macOS update. The image reveals a new laptop that fully fits the description of rumored MacBook Pro, which Apple is expected to launch on October 27. The laptop in the picture has what seems like a "contextual" OLED display (some are calling it Magic Toolbar display) on the top. What's interesting from that picture is that there's no physical Escape key or Power key to be found anywhere.

Editor's note: We usually tend to avoid covering leaks and rumors, but several readers pitched the story to us, and media outlets are also covering it now, which adds some credibility to the matter.

Uber's Self-Driving Truck Went on a 120-Mile Beer Run To Make History ( 241

An anonymous reader writes: In the arms race to build self-driving vehicles, Uber-owned Otto just reached a landmark milestone by completing the first-ever commercial cargo run for a self-driving truck. On October 20, the self-driving truck left Fort Collins, Colorado at 1 a.m. and drove itself 120 miles on I-25 to Colorado Springs. The driver, who has to be there to help the truck get on and off the interstate exit ramps, moved to the backseat alongside a crowd of transportation officials to watch the historic ride. 2,000 cases of Budweiser beer filled the trailer. "We're just thrilled. We do think this is the future of transportation," James Sembrot, senior director of logistics strategy at Anheuser-Busch, told Business Insider.

Comment Re:YEEE-HAW! (Score 1) 205

Everybody likes Putin so much his party gets 99.5% votes with 99.4% turnout in a republic whose population got expelled then mercifully let to return twice, and has been at a civil war with Russia until 2000 when it was brutally pacified, and some insurgency is smoldering to this day.

Well at least it was not 99.5% of the 160% voter turnout like in the last Russian election.

Comment Re:Immediately turn phone off (Score 1) 428

If your turn your phone off/reboot the moment the police turn up it means you can't film them with it. So you have to choose between filing and risking them grabbing it, or protecting your privacy.

Phones need a panic button. Say tap the power button three times quickly and it goes into a locked down mode where it records video as long as you hold the volume button down, and the moment you let go it reboots and all data is safety encrypted.

Kinda sucks that we need to use suicide bomber tactics now.

Just don't lock the phone with a fingerprint in the first place. It is super weak lock mechanism in the first place.

Comment Re:Hold down power button and ... (Score 1) 428

He's more like a little boy who has no idea what to do or how to do it.

Little boys and girls are tyrants. Children are sociopaths who must be trained to be civilized human beings [1]. Sometimes training doesn't take, ergo, Trump.

[1] There's a quote around there that says this better than I could, so if anyone knows it please let me know!

It is not training as such, but they need to grow up emotionally. And they are not sociopaths, children are "psychopaths", though we usually wouldn't use that word for pre-adolescents.

Comment Re:If the point was ... (Score 4, Insightful) 333

There's no proof that it has anything to do with Wikileaks, but in a world of IoT devices with no thought toward security, anyone who cares to do so can mount DDOS with the power of a national entity.

What's the point of doing what Assange and Wikileaks have been doing without any moral position? He isn't helping his own case.

Comment Re:Legal? (Score 2) 281

No, of course it is not legal to set a trap to intentionally hurt someone, even if you expect that the trap could only be activated by the person committing property theft or vandalism. Otherwise, you'd see shotguns built into burglar alarms.

Fire alarm stations sometimes shoot a blue dye which is difficult to remove or one which only shows under UV. Never stand in front of one when pulling the lever! But they are not supposed to hurt you.

And of course these booby traps generally are not as reliable as the so-called "inventor" thinks and tend to hurt the innocent.

Comment Re:First lesson (Score 4, Interesting) 135

I have two major beefs with IPV6. The first is that the end-point 2^48 switch address space wasn't well thought-through. Hey, wouldn't it be great if we didn't have to use NAT and give all of those IOT devices their own IPV6 address? Well... no actually, NAT does a pretty good job of obscuring the internal topology of the end-point network. Just having a statefull firewall and no NAT exposes the internal topology. Not such a good idea.

The second is that all the discovery protocols were left unencrypted and made complex enough to virtually guarantee a plethora of possible exploits. Some have been discovered and fixed, I guarantee there are many more in the wings. IPV4 security is a well known problem with well known solutions. IPV6 security is a different beast entirely.

Other problems including the excessively flexible protocol layering allowing for all sorts of encapsulation tricks (some of which have already been demonstrated), pasting on a 'mandatory' IPSEC without integration with a mandatory secure validation framework (making it worthless w/regards to generic applications being able to assert a packet-level secure connection), assumptions that the address space would be too big to scan (yah right... the hackers didn't get that memo my tcpdump tells me), not making use of MAC-layer features that would have improved local LAN security, if only a little. Also idiotically and arbitrarily blocking off a switch subspace, eating 48 bits for no good reason and trying to disallow routing within that space (which will soon have to be changed considering that number of people who want to have stateful *routers* to break up their sub-48-bit traffic and who have no desire whatsoever to treat those 48 bits as one big switched sub-space).

The list goes on. But now we are saddled with this pile, so we have to deal with it.


Comment Flood defenses? (Score 5, Informative) 135

There is no flood defense possible for most businesses at the tail-end of the pipe. When an attacker pushes a terrabit/s at you and at all the routers in the path leading to you as well as other leafs that terminate at those routers, from 3 million different IP addresses from compromised IOT devices, your internet pipes are dead, no matter how much redundancy you have.

Only the biggest companies out there can handle these kinds of attacks. The backbone providers have some defenses, but it isn't as simple as just blocking a few IPs.



Macs End Up Costing 3 Times Less Than Windows PCs Because of Fewer Tech Support Expense, Says IBM's IT Guy ( 523

An anonymous reader shares a report on Yahoo (edited): Last year, Fletcher Previn became a cult figure of sorts in the world of enterprise IT. As IBM's VP of Workplace as a Service, Previn is the guy responsible for turning IBM (the company that invented the PC) into an Apple Mac house. Previn gave a great presentation at last year's Jamf tech conference where he said Macs were less expensive to support than Windows. Only 5% of IBM's Mac employees needed help desk support versus 40% of PC users. At that time, some 30,000 IBM employees were using Macs. Today 90,000 of them are, he said. And IBM ultimately plans to distribute 150,000 to 200,000 Macs to workers, meaning about half of IBM's approximately 370,000 employees will have Macs. Previn's team is responsible for all the company's PCs, not just the Macs. All told IBM's IT department supports about 604,000 laptops between employees and its 100,000+ contractors. Most of them are Windows machines -- 442,000 -- while 90,000 are Macs and 72,000 are Linux PCs. IBM is adding about 1,300 Macs a week, Previn said.

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