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The Courts

University of California IT Workers Replaced By Offshore Outsourcing Firm To File Discrimination Lawsuit (computerworld.com) 49

The IT workers from the University of California's San Francisco campus who were replaced by an offshore outsourcing firm late last year intend to file a lawsuit challenging their dismissal. "It will allege that the tech workers at the university's San Francisco campus were victims of age and national origin discrimination," reports Computerworld. From the report: The IT employees lost their jobs in February after the university hired India-based IT services firm HCL. Approximately 50 full-time university employees lost their jobs, but another 30 contractor positions were cut as well. "To take a workforce that is overwhelmingly over the age of 40 and replace them with folks who are mainly in their 20s -- early 20s, in fact -- we think is age discrimination," said the IT employees' attorney, Randall Strauss, of Gwilliam Ivary Chiosso Cavalli & Brewer. The national origin discrimination claim is the result of taking a workforce "that reflects the diversity of California" and is summarily let go and is "replaced with people who come from one particular part of the world," said Strauss. The lawsuit will be filed in Alameda County Superior Court.

Comment Re:COBOL isn't hard to learn (Score 0) 155

All programming languages are tedious as fuck to use.

Only when you try to apply them to problems that are too far removed from their own domain of interest. In my experience, COBOL development is tedious even in the very domain for which it is intended - business oriented programming. You can do everything that you can in COBOL in python, for instance, and the resulting work would be just as readable and far less verbose.

COBOL programs lack elegance... they are the epitome of the saying "everything looks like a nail when you have a hammer".

Comment All the easy jobs have gone (Score 1) 179

No need for dictation, short hand and smart staff with the skills to spell engineering, legal or medical terms.
Professionals do their own work with their own powerful computers.

Printer, fax machine, punch cards still need support per department? Accounting paperwork? Staff going to the bank during working hours?
Computers or outside contractors have taken many of the roles that normal working class staff could expect in the 1970's.
Legal is now a lawyer not a vast in house legal department with all its own support staff.
A real coffee machine has replaced a canteen full of staff to push a trolly around with coffee.

The phone system that needed a human to take a call, direct a call and keep messages is now a professionals own smart phone.
The role of poor people with no or few skills is not needed in vast numbers to support a few professionals or experts all day.
Working for a computer company in the past was doing maths by hand to get the work ready for computer programming, programming a computer by creating punch cards, ensuring the printer had paper. Waiting for the computer to print out why it failed, looking at the math by hand again and trying to work the complex math with on the computer again. Low paid staff had to help with getting the computer ready again.
Ordering more paper and punch cards, ensuring the supply of paper and punch cards was always ready for a larger project.
Keeping accounts on paper. Entering paper accounts in to computers, then paying bills on time and ensuring the generated paper work matched the computer records.
Connecting calls, taking messages, making coffee, greeting visitors and guiding them past departments full of support staff to meet the expert staff.

So a lot of people could claim they worked with "computers" or "programmed" a computer as a "job".
Doing the same "math" on "paper" all day to help a computer expert was not programming or a job with much internal advancement or good pay.
A few experts back then did all the real work like in 2017. Many other people with much fewer skills and low pay just ensured everything was ready for the complex tasks.

Tax rates and political import controls also helped. A company had to do all the complex computer work within their own nation or factor in complex import tax issues or for security reasons. Now a gov, mil contractor, the private sector can buy much cheap support globally.

The CRT allowed one expert to see and correct their all their computer work without staff having to prepare and load up the computer again.
So lots of low wage staff got to work on vast projects that only ever really needed a few smart people and better computers.

Comment Re:Pay your fucking taxes instead (Score 1) 157

>almost always are perennial whiners who have no interest in playing the game correctly

The rich have no interest in playing the game correctly *either* but they get a pass while the rest of us have people like you bitching at us for wanting to the rich to play by the rules *also*

Because at heart, you are just another celebrity worshiper and "temporarily embarrassed millionaire."

>students threatening to lawyer up fastest

Who the fuck do you think are the ones who do that /first/?

It's not the middle-class or working-class family based student. They can't /afford/ to waste money on a lawyer, or the time.

How about you have a nice big cup o' STFU?

--
BMO

Comment Re:Challenge accepted (Score 1) 155

You say that now....

COBOL is not at all hard to learn, and bordering on elementary to simply read and comprehend, but its verbosity makes it extremely tedious to develop in. The ease with which COBOL programs can be understood reasonably well simply by reading their code does not go anywhere nearly far enough to justify this amount of labor when it comes to doing actual development.

Comment Other nations sneak in their writers (Score 2) 183

The UK, Irish, Australian, New Zealand, Canadian governments start to set up tax payer funded front companies in the USA to push their own entreatment related products and services deep in the USA.
US audiences are presented with foreign 1960-90's plots. Acted by Canadians with perfect US accents in low tax and production friendly Canada.
Every new US series is set in a "Seattle", "Maine" or "North Dakota" Canada with scripts that have some positive comments about Canada and its policies.
Random charming characters from Australia, Canada, New Zealand or Ireland might feature in later seasons.
Plots often feature visits to or from the nations funding the series.
Maple syrup and timber products get product placements.
A large kangaroo or a random trip to Australia is effortlessly worked into the plot.

Comment So (Score 3, Insightful) 65

No mention of the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989.
No upsetting Communist Party leaders.
No negative comments on past Communist leaders.
No comments on cults, faiths, monarchies, theocracies.
No news about war crimes and weapons sales.
Banning of all faith related cartoons.
No blasphemy.
Dont mention the policy of allowing illegal migrants to wonder around.
No negative reviews of movies.
No comments on the role of SJW reporting comments to governments.
No comments on herbicides.
No comments on genetic engineering.
No quoting, linking to any whistleblower material. No comments about or links to terms like Birdwatcher or Blackpearl.
No comments about engineers.
No links about circumventing access-control measures or comments on anti-circumvention laws.

Comment Re:About time (Score 3) 65

No, you twit, his point was that if they're going to censor non-US "fake news sites" they should censor US fake-news *also.*

But that's not going to happen, because "Official News" is what the US government wants you to believe and nothing else. There is no independent mainstream media anymore. The ones with "access" to the WH and elsewhere in DC are the ones that act as stenographers for the official party line (the party being that of the moneyed), truth be damned.

Just because other countries do it doesn't mean it's right for us to do it. And just because other countries do it, doesn't mean we /don't'/ as I will illustrate further down below.

If you defend the "purity" of the US, then you've bought into the biggest pile of bullshit going.

I wrote this the week following Easter:

---begin paste ---

I watched a Sunday news program this Easter with The Nan (Marirose's mom). The harebrained manufacture of consent and propaganda being spewed from the Tee Vee astounded me in its transparency. I just /couldn't/ accept what they were selling because it felt like I was in a time warp being sold the same bill of goods about Saddam. And it was about going to war with /both/ Syria and North Korea.

I couldn't tell you which one it was, because I never saw the intro and my Sunday viewing habits are... scarce.

All the way from Vietnam to the present day...

"Every time we've gone to war in my lifetime, the government has lied to us" - Jimmy Dore

Jimmy Dore is my age. He's absolutely correct.

From the Gulf of Tonkin to today, it's been a lie /every time/. Without fail, it's been a lie.

Every
Single
Time

For my 51 years on this spinning speck of dirt in the universe, these lies have caused millions to needlessly suffer and die either directly in the case of Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan, etc., (this includes the war on some drugs in Columbia and elsewhere and covert wars such as in Central America) or indirectly in the case of Cambodia and others. And absolutely nobody in the US, who has any power at all, has any negative repercussions on them for starting a war with a lie. Indeed, such people rise to the top and wear epaulets with stars on them and shiny suits or at least show up on TV as a sage and get paid to offer pro-war opinion.

The entire history of the US from the end of WWII to today is the history of manufactured consent for war through the media. Had Herr Goebbels lived to see it instead of taking cyanide, he would have been proud.

"Now you can join the ranks of the illustrious
In history's great dark hall of fame
All our greatest killers were industrious
At least the ones that we all know by name

But you can reach the top of your profession
If you become the leader of the land
For murder is the sport of the elected
And you don't need to lift a finger of your hand"

-- The Police "Murder by Numbers"

When I leave this vale of tears or shuffle off this mortal coil, the number of middle fingers I will have to give will be counted in /sagans/.

Fuck you, you fucking fucks.

---end paste---

I was corrected later that the use of media to manufacture consent for war in the US was /at least/ as old as the Spanish American War.

--
BMO

Comment Re:Denial-of-Service? (Score 1) 110

My point was that experts can teach people what things to look for... that was my point... ideally people will learn about the technology themselves from such people and learn what sort of things they should be looking for when it comes to vulnerabilities.

I'm not suggesting that such education should necessarily be freely given by experts without any compensation, but I don't think it's an unreasonable demand on consumers who don't know how to tell if their devices are secure to put some effort into learning.

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