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Submission + - IT Staff Handovers - How to manage taking over from a former Sys Admin

Solar1ze writes: I've just started a role in a IT services firm. I'm required to take over from an incumbent, who has been in the position for three years. What are some of the best practices that have been used in the knowledge transfer that you have used when you've taken over from another IT staff member? How do you digest the thousands of hosts, networks and associated software systems in a week into a digestable format, especially when some documentation exists, but much of it is still in the mind of the former worker?
The Almighty Buck

Submission + - London Stock Exchange Goes Linux! (ibspublishing.com)

farrellj writes: As mentioned before here on Slashdot, the London Stock Exchange (LSE) has been looking to replace it's Windows/.Net based trading system for a while now. What wasn't expected was that not only would they turn to Linux to replace it, but would actually *buy* a company and bring development in-house, rather than outsourcing! The company that the LSE has bought is a Sri Lankan developer MillenniumIT, which has developed a trading system based upon Linux and Solaris. Among the many benefits of the new system that comes from using Linux is an order of magnitude increase in trading speed from 2.7 milliseconds using Windows/.Net to 0.4 milliseconds using Linux-based system. Enjoy all of the details from the Fine Article here.

Submission + - G20 Protesters Arrested for Using Twitter (pittsburghlive.com) 1

xappax writes: Two hackers set up a real-time "information clearinghouse" system during the recent protests of the G20 summit in Pittsburgh. The system used custom software combined with Twitter to allow them to receive and send instant updates on what was happening during the protests, such as food servings, changes in schedule, and police activity on the streets.
They have both been arrested for "criminal use of a communication facility", and one had his home in Queens raided by FBI anti-terrorism agents.
Is using Twitter to aggregate publicly available information a crime?

Earth

Submission + - France Announces $2.2 Billion EV Charging Network (inhabitat.com)

MikeChino writes: As the United States government continues to drag its heels on passing climate change legislation, itâ(TM)s encouraging to see folks in Europe making moves in the right direction. Last week, the French government announced it would dedicate $2.2 billion to creating a network of battery-charging stations for electric vehicles. The plan will also require all parking lots to contain battery charging stations by 2015, paving the way for a massive shift towards cleaner transportation.

Feed Engadget: RIAA chief says ripping okay, Sony BMG lawyer "misspoke" during Jammie Thomas tr (engadget.com)

Filed under: Portable Audio

Now that the furor has died down over the Washington Post's questionable piece about the RIAA supposedly suing Jeffrey Howell for ripping CDs, it's time to hear what the RIAA actually has to say -- and it's surprisingly sensible. Speaking to NPR, RIAA president Cary Sherman flatly said "the story is just wrong." Sherman went on to say that the RIAA hasn't ever prosecuted anyone for ripping or copying for personal use, and that the only issue in the Jeffrey Howell case was -- as always -- sharing files on Kazaa. Perhaps most interestingly, Sherman directly addressed the "ripping is just a nice way of saying 'steals one copy'" comment made by Sony BMG's anti-piracy counsel in the Jammie Thomas case, saying that the attorney "misspoke," and that neither Sony BMG or the RIAA agreed with that position.

Of course, it wasn't all sunshine and cupcakes -- Sherman refused to straight-up answer the question of whether or not ripping was legal, saying instead that "there are 100 hypotheticals" and that "copyright law is very complicated." Of course, what he's really saying is that courts haven't made an clear determination of fair use regarding ripping and that he's covering the industry's collective ass -- which explains his hilariously out-of-touch explanation that making copies onto "analog cassettes, special audio CD-Rs, minidiscs, and digital tapes" is legal, because those are all expressly allowed by law. On the other hand, Sherman also said that RIAA's interpretation of the law "doesn't really matter," because "not a single claim has ever been brought over personal use -- [the Washington Post story is] really unfortunate, it's misleading consumers, and it's simply not true." It's a fascinating interview, and it's more than worth a listen if you've got any interest at all in copyright issues -- regardless of what side you're on.

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Privacy

Submission + - Bulgaria Beats US in respecting privacy (computerworld.com)

An anonymous reader writes: http://blogs.computerworld.com/u_s_at_the_bottom_of_the_barrel_when_it_comes_to_privacy Yes, Privacy International Rate the old US of A as one of the most intrusive and least respectful governments in the world. The fact that Bulgaria respects the privacy of its citizens more that the US does is sad. In fact we rank alongside China, who thoughtfully censors internet content for its citizens. Don't shake your head about that, because H.R 1955 aka the "Thought Crime" bill finds that the internet is a constant source of terrorist propaganda bombarding the helpless American citizens. In the testimony for this bill, horrifying terrorist propaganda websites, such as http://911truth.org/ were held as prime examples of this campaign of terror that threatens the American citizen. Funny, I just thought the website talked about inconsistency in the Government's explaination of the 9/11 attack on the Word Trade Center. I guess the government thinks anyone who challenges their explanation of this incident must be a terrorist. Historically speaking, 9/11 reminds me of another incident. The German Parliament building was burned down, and the Chancellor Hitler accused Communist terrorists of destroying the building, despite evidence that Hitler's goons set the fire. Soon Hitler got laws passed erasing the rights of German citizens. Result, 6 Million Jews murdered and 50 or 60 million dead in a world war. But that couldn't happen here in America, I mean would we pass a law creating a secret police that could torture people and hold them without trial? http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=h110-1955
Spam

Submission + - Spam King Alan Ralsky under indictment (freep.com)

maxx_entropy writes: Spam King Alan Ralsky under indictment

The U.S. Attorney's Office has scheduled a news conference today to announce the indictment of 11 people in a major Internet spam investigation.
It described the indictment as one of the largest nationwide.
Among the indicted are Alan Ralsky of West Bloomfield, his son-in-law and nine others. They were indicted in Detroit on charges of running an illegal Internet spam operation.

Security

Submission + - SPAM: Top 5 security-menace predictions for 2008

alphadogg writes: If this year will be remembered for high-profile data breaches, with the TJX break-in topping a long list, then what troubles are in store for 2008? Predictions include more powerful hacker botnets that elude shutdown and growth in numbers of compromised Web sites that attack trusting, unsuspecting visitors. Those are some of the picks from Symantec's director of emerging technologies, Oliver Friedrichs.
Link to Original Source
Announcements

Submission + - Digital mutiny: 2,000 page iraq leak (wikileaks.org)

An anonymous reader writes: Looks like them wikileaks guys are finally putting something out there.

from the site:

This spectacular 2,000 page US military leak consists of the names, group structure and equipment registers of all units in Iraq with US army equipment . It exposes secretive document exploitation centers, detainee operations, elements of the State Department, Air Force, Navy and Marines units, the Iraqi police and coalition forces from Poland, Denmark, Ukraine, Latvia, Slovakia, Romania, Armenia, Kazakhstan and El Salvador. The material represents nearly the entire order of battle for US forces in Iraq and is the first public revelation of many of the military units described. Among other matters it shows that the United States has violated the Chemical Weapons Convention.

Education

Submission + - Schools Placing at 99th Percentile for Cheating 3

theodp writes: "Time reports that sometimes No-Child-Left-Behind really means No-Test-Scores-Left-Behind, creating opportunities for data forensics firms like Caveon (check out their Ten Most Wanted Cheaters poster). Take Houston's Forest Brook H.S., which was a shining example of school reform. In 2005, after years of rock-bottom test scores, 95% of its 11th graders passed the state science test. Teachers were praised and the school was awarded a $165,000 grant by the governor. But an investigation found a host of irregularities and last year's testing was monitored by an outside agency. Test scores plunged and only 39% passed science."
Data Storage

Submission + - Ferrotoroidicity, key to faster hard disks?

Roland Piquepaille writes: "I bet that not many of you have heard about ferrotoroidicity. In fact, Google returns only 37 results about this concept as I'm typing this. In a nutshell, three forms of ferroic material are widely known: ferromagnetism, ferroelectricity and ferroelasticity. But European scientists have discovered a fourth form, which they called ferrotoroidicity. This phenomenon could lead to a new way to store data on atomic roundabouts. As the lead researcher said, 'One could compare ferrotoroidic domains with roundabouts in, say, the UK and Germany where cars go around in clockwise or counter-clockwise direction.' Even if this discovery is very interesting, it looks like many years will pass before this ferrotoroidic effect can be used to manufacture faster and more reliable hard disks. But read more for additional details and a diagram showing how the ferrotoroidic effect has its place along with other states of ferroic material."

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