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Submission + - OpenSSL Patches Bug Created by Patch From Last Week

Trailrunner7 writes: Four days after releasing a new version that fixed several security problems, the OpenSSL maintainers have rushed out another version that patches a vulnerability introduced in version 1.1.0a on Sept. 22.

Last week, OpenSSL patched 14 security flaws in various versions of the software, which is the most widely used toolkit for implementing TLS. One of the vulnerabilities fixed in that release was a low-risk bug related to memory allocation in tls_get_message_header.

The problem is, the patch for that vulnerability actually introduced a separate critical bug. The new vulnerability, which is fixed in version 1.1.0b, only affected version 1.1.0a, but it can lead to arbitrary code execution.

Submission + - Needed: A universal file wrapper for data continuity (enterprisestorageforum.com)

storagedude writes: With thousands of file formats that quickly become incompatible and outdated, our data today likely won't have the staying power that hieroglyphs or even paper enjoyed. The solution:
a universal file wrapper agreed upon by standards bodies, writes Henry Newman on Enterprise Storage Forum.

' I would like to suggest that an ANSI, ISO or IEEE committee come together and create an open standard for self-describing data. This format must encompass all other formats that exist today in weather, multiple medical formats, geospatial, genetics and so on. This working group could meet and get agreement across various industries in pretty short order, I believe. Just like wrapping files that are already wrapped. This clearly doesn’t solve the whole problem with its long-term issues, but it does get us to a common agreed format. This could also be used for any other file type like a jpeg.'

Submission + - Hot Debate Raging on The Proposed Super Particle Collider in China (scmp.com)

hackingbear writes: Chinese high-energy physicists proposed four years ago to build a particle collider four times the size of the Large Hadron Collider in Europe. On Sunday, Dr Yang Chen-ning, co-winner of the Nobel Prize in physics in 1957 and now living on campus at Tsinghua University in Beijing, released an article on WeChat opposing the construction of the collider. He said the project would become an investment “black hole” with little scientific value or benefit to society, sucking resources away from other research sectors such as life sciences and quantum physics. Yang’s article hit nearly all social media platforms and internet news portals, drawing tens of thousands of positive comments over the last couple of days. The first stage of the project was estimated to cost 40 billion yuan (US$6 billion) by 2030, and the total cost would exceed 140 billion yuan (US$21 billion) when construction is completed in 2050, making it the most expensive research facility built in China. Yang’s main argument was that China would not succeed where the United States had failed. A similar project had been proposed in the US but was eventually cancelled in 2012 as the construction far exceeded the initial budget. Yang said existing facilities including the Large Hadron Collider contributed little to the increase of human knowledge and was irrelevant to most people’s daily lives. But Dr Wang Yifang, lead scientist of the project with the Chinese Academy of Sciences’ Institute of High Energy Physics, argued research in high energy physics lead to the world wide web, mobile phone touch screens and magnetic resonance imaging in hospitals, among other technological breakthroughs.

Comment Re:able to take SLR-quality images (Score 2) 551

What matters is not the diameter of the PSF itself, but the MTF (its Fourier's transform). The optical cut-off frequency is at 1/(lambda*F#) \approx 1010 lpmm (line pairs per mm) at 550nm (green color). The sensor cut-off is at 1/pitch \approx 833lpmm and the Nyquist frequency is at half that (416lpmm). So there is still a bit of information to suck still. Then it really depends on the shape of the PSF and how it lowers the MTF profile. These restrictions are physical and, thus, the same than for a DSLR.

I am not saying than this camera is nowhere near that of a DSLR; but your argument does not work here.

Comment Re:What a read. (Score 1) 107

a network of deep space communications satellites colliding signals to create constructive interference to boost communications

After reading the article, I don't think they were using spaceborne emitters to build the constructive interference around the satellite location, but only ground based stations.
The amount of timing precision required to trigger long-distance emitters and get this coherence would have been amazing. Doing so on the ground is still great but nowhere as difficult.

Submission + - SPAM: Nuclear's Glacial Pace

mdsolar writes: Climate change has forced us to rethink how we get electricity. Use of renewable sources like solar and wind is rapidly increasing, while nuclear, though long a reliable source of carbon-free electricity, is not. Meanwhile, a number of startups are promising cheap, safe, proliferation-resistant nuclear energy in the next decade (see “Fail-Safe Nuclear Power”).

Can these startups fulfill their promises? Outside of China, nuclear power is expanding nowhere. China has 21 new reactors under construction; Russia has nine, India six. The U.S. is bringing five new plants online, but since 2012, five other reactors have been retired, with seven more to be shuttered by 2019. California’s Diablo Canyon plant recently announced it will close by 2025. With other plants closing in Japan, Germany, and the U.K., more reactors may be decommissioned than built in the near future.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - The coral die-off crisis is a climate crime and Exxon fired the gun (theguardian.com) 1

mspohr writes: An article published by Bill McKibben in The Guardian points the finger at Exxon for spreading climate change denial which led to lack of action to prevent widespread coral die-off.
"We know the biggest culprits now, because great detective work by investigative journalists has uncovered key facts in the past year. The world’s biggest oil company, Exxon, knew everything there was to know about climate change by the late 1970s and early 1980s. Its scientists understood how much and how fast it was going to warm, and how much damage that was going to do. And the company knew the scientists were right: that’s why they started “climate-proofing” their own installations, for instance building their drilling rigs to accommodate the sea level rise they knew was coming.

What they didn’t do was tell the rest of us. Instead, they – and many other players in the fossil fuel industry – bankrolled the rise of the climate denial industry, helping fund the “thinktanks” and front groups that spent the last generation propagating the phoney idea that there was a deep debate about the reality of global warming. As a result, we’ve wasted a quarter century in a phoney argument about whether the climate was changing."

Submission + - Michel Rocard, politician and software patent oponent, passed away at 85 (google.fr)

dujardin writes: Michel Rocard had been a high-rank moderate leftist politician in France from the 60's to the 2000's. He is now celebrated in France for his commitments and his achievements, but he was also a key player in the rebuttal of software patents in the E.U. in 2005. See his page on wiipedia, and a specific (Google-translated) page on this topic below.

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