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Submission + - Trade Secrets Stolen From ThyssenKrupp In Major Hack

An anonymous reader writes: German steel manufacturer ThyssenKrupp has been hacked in a major cyberattack, coordinated by unnamed malicious actors based in south-east Asia. The large-scale attack was targeted at the German firm to steal its technical trade secrets. Martin Hölze, CIO at ThyssenKrupp said that the company had been the target of a ‘very professional hacker attack since February.’ The breach was executed through hidden backdoors in the IT systems which were used to gain access to the steel giant’s valuable intellectual property. ThyssenKrupp said that the attack was uncovered in April by its own in-house computer emergency response team (CERT), which has since cleaned and re-secured the infected systems. State and federal cyber security and data protection agencies were informed of the hack. A criminal complaint was also lodged with police in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia.

Submission + - Chinese Scientist Found Breakthrough Vaccine/Cures for All Viral Infections (scmp.com)

hackingbear writes: Chinese scientists may have found the key to creating effective vaccines for the world’s deadly viruses including bird flu, SARS, Ebola, and HIV. An experiment by a research team at Beijing University was hailed as “revolutionary” in the field in a paper published in the latest issue of Science magazine on Friday. The live virus used in the vaccine used by the researchers had its genetic code tweaked to disable the viral strains’ self-replication mechanism. But it was kept fully infectious to allow the host animal cells to generate immunity. Using live viruses in their fully infectious form was considered taboo, as viruses spread rapidly. Vaccines sold and used widely today generally contain either dead or weakened forms of viruses. The animals infected with virus were cured after receiving the injection, according to the paper. This breakthrough promises to simplify the process of producing vaccines, which may help scientists develop effective vaccines or even cures for various viruses – such bird flu, SARS, Ebola and HIV – within weeks of an outbreak.

Submission + - A physical model for (some of) Tabby's Star's light dips. 2

RockDoctor writes: A fresh paper on Arxiv describes a model proposed to explain at least some of the light dips in "Tabby's Star" (Kepler Input Catalogue KIC 8462852). When the irregular light received from this star was recognised in 2015, nobody could come up with a credible explanation for the irregularity of the star's light dips, or their depth. Further studies suggest sustained dimming over the photographic observation epoch, further deepening the puzzle. This new paper proposes a model of a jet of material which leaves the star's surface, then casts off a plume described as "smoke plume" which is swept around in the stars orbit. The opaque jet and the less-opaque "smoke plume" then intersect with the light travelling towards us to generate an asymmetric dip in the star's light curve, as observed in the past.

Which is an interesting model. The big peculiarity is that the "smoke plume" orientation with respect to the material jet implies that the outer parts of this star's envelope is rotating faster than the inner part where the jet originates. Which would raise almost as many questions as the original discovery.

Definitely, this is a very peculiar system.

(PDF here ; NB, the paper does not appear to have been submitted to a journal, or peer-reviewed.)

Submission + - ESA launches four Galileo satellites (esa.int)

nojayuk writes: From the ESA website: An Ariane 5 rocket has launched four additional Galileo satellites, accelerating deployment of the new satellite navigation system. The Ariane 5, operated by Arianespace, lifted off from Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana at 13:06 GMT (14:06 CET, 10:06 local time) carrying Galileo satellites 15–18. The first pair was released 3 hours 35 minutes and 44 seconds after liftoff, while the second separated 20 minutes later. The Galileos are at their target altitude, after a flawless release from the new dispenser designed to handle four satellites.

This was the first flight of a heavy-lift ES-variant of the Ariane V since the ATV resupply missions to the ISS. Previously Galileo satellites have been launched in pairs by Soyuz-Fregat craft from French Guiana. Two additional Ariane 5 launches each carrying four Galileo satellites are scheduled in 2017 and 2018. The full system of 24 satellites plus spares is expected to be in place by 2020.

Submission + - Mozilla Updates Firefox Focus For iOS With A Stripped-Down Private Browser

Krystalo writes: Mozilla today launched a new browser for iOS. In addition to Firefox, the company now also offers Firefox Focus, a browser dedicated to user privacy that by default blocks many web trackers, including analytics, social, and advertising. You can download the new app now from Apple’s App Store. If you’re getting a huge feeling of déjà vu, that’s because in December 2015, Mozilla launched Focus by Firefox, a content blocker for iOS. The company has now rebranded the app as Firefox Focus, and it serves two purposes. The content blocker, which can still be used with Safari, remains unchanged. The basic browser, which can be used in conjunction with Firefox for iOS, is new.

Submission + - 2016 on track to become hottest year on record (wmo.int)

ventsyv writes: In June NASA reported that the first 6 months of 2016 were the hottest 6 months on record. Now WMO reports that 2016 has stayed on track and will probably break the 2015 record.

Preliminary data shows that 2016’s global temperatures are approximately 1.2 Celsius above pre-industrial levels, according to an assessment by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). Global temperatures for January to September 2016 have been about 0.88 Celsius (1.58F) above the average (14C) for the 1961-1990 reference period, which is used by WMO as a baseline.

Long-term climate change indicators are also record breaking. Concentrations of major greenhouse gases in the atmosphere continue to increase to new records. Arctic sea ice remained at very low levels, especially during early 2016 and the October re-freezing period, and there was significant and very early melting of the Greenland ice sheet.

NOAA lists the current ranking as:

  1. 2015
  2. 2014
  3. 2010
  4. 2013
  5. 2005

https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc...

Submission + - Donald J. Trump Elected as 45th President of the United States (nytimes.com) 2

Xenographic writes: Google's map of results is now calling the race for Donald J. Trump. This is something that Nate Silver jokingly predicted this back on May 10th when he wrote "Reminder: Cubs will win the World Series and, in exchange, President Trump will be elected 8 days later." The House & Senate are also under Republican control. In other news, the Canadian immigration site has crashed under heavy load.

Submission + - SPAM: Nuclear weapon missing since 1950 'may have been found' 1

schwit1 writes: A commercial diver may have discovered a lost decommissioned US nuclear bomb off the coast of Canada.

Sean Smyrichinsky was diving for sea cucumbers near British Columbia when he discovered a large metal device that looked a bit like a flying saucer.

The Canadian Department of National Defence (DND) believes it could be a "lost nuke" from a US B-36 bomber that crashed in the area in 1950.

The government does not believe the bomb contains active nuclear material.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - US Government Releases Federal Code On Open Source Code.Gov

Mickeycaskill writes: The US government has decided to place all Federal source code online in a single repository called Code.gov so that Americans can check out the “people’s code”.

The idea is the brain child of US chief information officer Tony Scott, the former CIO of VMware hired by the Obama administration in February 2015, and follows the publication of the Federal Source Code Policy in August.

In a nutshell, this policy requires any code developed by or for the US federal government, must be released a permissive open source licence, and that the source code must be made publicly available.

“The code for these platforms is, after all, the People’s Code – and today we’re excited to announce that it’ll be accessible from one place, Code.gov, for the American people to explore, improve, and innovate,” said Scott.

It seems that so far the Code.gov repository already contains the source code to nearly 50 open source projects from over 10 agencies.

Submission + - US Republican Senate Committee hacked

pdclarry writes: While all of the recent news has been about hacking the Democratic party, apparently the Republicans have also been hacked, over many months (since March 2016). This was not about politics, however; it was to steal credit card numbers. Brian Krebs reports that; "a report this past week out of The Netherlands suggests Russian hackers have for the past six months been siphoning credit card data from visitors to the Web storefront of the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC)." "If you purchased a “Never Hillary” poster or donated funds to the NRSC through its Web site between March 2016 and the first week of this month [October 2016], there’s an excellent chance that your payment card data was siphoned by malware and is now for sale in the cybercrime underground." Krebs says his information comes from Dutch researcher Willem De Groot, co-founder and head of security at Dutch e-commerce site byte.nl. The Republicans were not alone; theirs was just one of 5,900 e-commerce sites hacked by the same Russian actors.

Submission + - Cells can choose burning fat over burning glucose when sick (economist.com)

Beeftopia writes: A recent paper published in the journal Cell finds cells can preferentially choose burning either fat or glucose depending on the nature of the infection (viral or bacterial). This seems to have implications for obesity research, if cells can be chemically prodded into preferentially burning fat.

The saying, "Feed a cold, starve a fever" was somewhat borne out by this study. The article states, "mice with bacterial infections that were fed glucose died. But infected mice fed a version of glucose that they could not metabolise lived. Again, those results were nearly reversed in mice suffering from a viral infection... [In bacterial infection] burning fat protected infected mice... Most animals instinctively respond to infection by cutting back on food."

Submission + - Climate Change Doubled the Size of Forest Fires In Western US, Says Study (time.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Man-made climate change has doubled the total area burned by forest fires in the Western U.S. in the past three decades, according to new research. Damage from forest fires has risen dramatically in recent decades, with the total acres burned in the U.S. rising from 2.9 million in 1985 to 10.1 million in 2015, according to National Interagency Fire Center data. Suppression costs paid by the federal government now top $2 billion. Now a new study, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, has found that a significant portion of the increase in land burned by forest fires can be attributed to man-made climate change. Other factors are also at play, including natural climate shifts and a change in how humans use land, but man-made climate change has had the biggest impact. That trend will likely continue as temperatures keep rising, researchers said. Climate change contributes to forest fires in a number of ways. Fires kill off trees and other plants that eventually dry and act as the fuel to feed massive wildfires. Global warming also increases the likelihood of the dry, warm weather in which wildfires can thrive. Average temperatures in the Western U.S. rose by 2.5 degree Fahrenheit since 1970, outpacing temperature rise elsewhere on the globe, according to the research.

Submission + - Britain's Nuclear Cover-Up (nytimes.com)

mdsolar writes: If the Hinkley plan seems outrageous, that’s because it only makes sense if one considers its connection to Britain’s military projects — especially Trident, a roving fleet of armed nuclear submarines, which is outdated and needs upgrading. Hawks and conservatives, in particular, see the Trident program as vital to preserving Britain’s international clout.

A painstaking study of obscure British military policy documents, released last month by the Science Policy Research Unit at the University of Sussex, demonstrates that the government and some of its partners in the defense industry, like Rolls-Royce and BAE Systems, think a robust civilian nuclear industry is essential to revamping Britain’s nuclear submarine program.

For proponents of Trident, civilian nuclear projects are a way of “masking” the high costs of developing a new fleet of nuclear submarines, according to the report. Merging programs like research and development or skills training across civilian and military sectors helps cut back on military spending. It also helps maintain the talent pool for nuclear specialists. And given the long lead times and life spans of most nuclear projects, connections between civilian and military programs give companies more incentives to make the major investments required.

One might say that with the Hinkley Point project, the British government is using billions of Chinese money to build stealth submarines designed to deter China.

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