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Comment Re:The entire premise is pure BS (Score 1) 294

I used to think that was a good argument, but then I worked with enough organizations to understand that they are all so far from operating at maximum efficiency that paying 20% more than they need to for an employee is the least of their worries. Hell, they are probably carrying all sorts of absurd dead weight in nepotism, and people promoted into incompetency, or simple 'bad hires' who looked good in the interview who haven't been detected yet or need to go through some kind of drawn out HR firing process. They are so far away from caring about the efficiency of 20% salary. Think about it.

Sexism is alive and well, and definitely impacts who is considered 'most competent' in the hiring process. I think /. would agree that most companies hiring developers don't even have an effective method of vetting their skills, much less have hiring managers capable of working around their own biases.

Submission + - Microsoft's Marketing Team and the Art of Shooting Self in Foot (theverge.com)

Apocryphos writes: We have all seen Microsoft's questionable marketing moves in the past, but their pride and joy seems to be copying the styles of their competitors poorly and a year late usually resulting in a cringe-generating commercial spots. Apple seems to be able to consistently appeal with the style of their ads, but not so with Microsoft. Now they are taking old internet memes and reincarnating them as a corporate vehicle. I, for one, am having fun imagining a marketing consultant telling Microsoft leadership that it's a viable strategy to "Create viral marketing on social media".

Submission + - EU invalidates US Safe Harbor Agreement Invalid (usatoday.com)

asylumx writes: Europe's top court on Tuesday ruled that a 15-year-old agreement allowing American companies to handle Europeans' data was invalid, a decision that could affect how technology companies such as Amazon, Facebook and Google operate overseas. The European Court of Justice examined the case of an Austrian citizen who claimed that his data, in light of revelations by Edward Snowden that U.S. agencies spied upon people in other nations, wasn't being adequately protected by Facebook.

The U.S. Mission to the European Union issued a statement saying that "the United States does not and has not engaged in indiscriminate surveillance of anyone, including ordinary European citizens." The PRISM surveillance program is "targeted against particular valid foreign intelligence targets, is duly authorized by law, and strictly complies with a number of publicly disclosed controls and limitations," the statement said.

Submission + - Why does Saas make Sense (authorstream.com)

Zilicus writes: If the business operations are driven by project methodology, the project organizations require common software and dataset to work with.

Submission + - Wikipedia Founder Jimmy Wales Ridicules Government Plans To Ban Encryption 1

Mickeycaskill writes: Jimmy Wales has said government leaders are "too late" to ban encryption which authorities say is thwarting attempts to protect the public from terrorism and other threats.

The Wikipedia founder said any attempt would be "a moronic, very stupid thing to do" and predicted all major web traffic would be encrypted soon.
Wikipedia itself has moved towards SSL encryption so all of its users' browsing habits cannot be spied on by intelligence agencies or governments.

Indeed, he said the efforts by the likes of the NSA and GCHQ to spy on individuals have actually made it harder to implement mass-surveillance programs because of the public backlash against Edward Snowden's revelations and increased awareness of privacy.

Wales also reiterated that his site would never co-operate with the Chinese government on the censorship of Wikipedia.

"We’ve taken a strong stand that access to knowledge is a principle human right," he said.

Comment Re:For starters... (Score 2) 842

Let me clarify - money isn't be-all measurement of effort. If it was, you are probably not putting any "effort" into the friendship either because the sums of money you spend on them relative to your income are so tiny that the corresponding figure on their part would buy nothing. Sometimes a person really struggles just to have time free from their own problems and pursuits to attend your event, for example.

Comment Re:HP/MPE had a hierarchical database, too (Score 1) 166

Yet Epic uses a single node per customer for all but a handful of its customers (Kaiser), and runs all of the customer's applications off that one server. The fact that they were able to do this was a major selling point, not a "limitation".

For Kaiser, they set up logical geographic nodes and built their own sync system to update the network of nodes on demand.

Comment Re:MUMPS is nothing special (Score 1) 166

In safety-critical systems where invalid data could kill someone, using a typeless, schema-less system with nonstandard language conventions as a starting point seems irresponsible. Why not start with a normalized relational database and a language designed to encapsulate and protect data from inadvertent data-entry or programming errors?

Because performance. Yes, Epic had to put extra work in to essentially build their own version of the SQL server black box, but now they are very difficult to compete with.

Epic doesn't use the Cache SQL API. Instead, they built an API on top of objectscript that stores fields safely. They have a staggering amount of code written in objectscript, and while it's true that "nothing will stop you" from writing directly to the underlying data oddly enough that doesn't seem to be an issue because developers can learn how to follow best practices.

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