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Submission + - Cesarean births *possibly* affecting human evolution 1

CanadianRealist writes: Larger babies delivered by cesarean section may be affecting human evolution. Researchers estimate cases where the baby cannot fit down the birth canal have increased from 30 in 1,000 in the 1960s to 36 in 1,000 births today. (Science Alert and ( BBC "this is happening headline" version.)

More detailed studies would be required to actually confirm the link between C-sections and evolution, as all we have now is a hypothesis based on the birth data.

Agreed, more studies required part. Cesareans may simply be becoming more common with “too large” defined as cesarean seems like a better idea. It's reasonable to pose the question based simply on an understanding of evolution. Like it's reasonable to conjecture that length of human pregnancy is a compromise between further development in utero, and chance of mother and baby surviving the delivery.

Comment Re:Mandate reporting when antibiotics are prescrib (Score 1) 75

Yes. But we need to be aware that man is not the only source of antibiotics. They naturally occur. We get a good lot of them from plants and bacteria, starting of course with penicilin which we got from mold, and which was already present on salted food and damp environments. What we did was to make antibiotics present in organisms other than their natural sources.

Comment Everything Old is New Again (Score 2) 75

The Andromeda Strain was published in 1969.

The United States has some disease reporting, it started at least 75 years ago before the antibiotic bubble. This CDC Report summarizes the present state of disease reporting, in two pages. We need higher standards of reporting and legal penalties for failure to report.

Submission + - Al Gore has "an extremely interesting conversation" with Trump (bbc.com)

tomhath writes: Mr Gore told reporters he met Ivanka before his meeting with her father.

"The bulk of the time was with the president-elect, Donald Trump. I found it an extremely interesting conversation, and to be continued," Mr Gore said.

Mr Trump has been stocking his administration with conservative ideologues, and many of the possible names for his environmental posts are sceptical of current policy. If Ms Trump pushes the issue and Mr Gore continues his "extremely interesting conversation" with the president, however, this could become a test of how willing President Trump is to cross party orthodoxy.

A free-agent president — beholden to neither party and willing to strike deals according to his own fancy — may be exactly what his voters wanted and what Washington insiders fear.

Submission + - What To Do If You Need To Learn To Code To Keep Your Job (backchannel.com)

mirandakatz writes: Karen Wickre has survived the highs and lows of Silicon Valley’s kingmakers, working everywhere from Twitter to Google, and now, she's taking her years of workplace savvy and applying it to her new gig as Backchannel's advice columnist. In this edition of the Help Desk: what to do if you're being told you need to learn to code to keep your job; how to handle being leveled down; and what to do when your manager is taking all of the credit for your entire team's work.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Where did member ~KGIII (973947) Go ??? (slashdot.org)

Bob_Who writes: KGIII (973947) last posted a comment on Slashdot on May 11, 2016.

Since that time, I have no clue whatsoever why KGIII (or the alias) has completely disappeared.

Does anyone have any idea if KGIII is alive??

Or in the big house? ....or looking down from the even bigger house ..... or has simply quit Slashdot and never looked back???

Its been a long while without a peep from profoundly lucid participant.

Anyone near Maine or Cuba or other place where KGIII may be lurking perhaps? I've been worried for months...

Submission + - Apple Pay arrives in Spain, But it isn't good news for everyone (medium.com)

dkatana writes: Spain is the fourth European country (after the UK, France and Switzerland), and the second in the Euro Zone, to get Apple Pay.

Apple has teamed up with Banco Santander and American Express to introduce their popular payment app, just in time for the holidays.

But not everyone is happy. Other banks will be under pressure to join the service, for which Apple charges a hefty setup fee, and then 15 basis points per transaction, which will have to come from merchants' processing fees.

That is why Apple Pay is not available everywhere in Europe. The European Central Bank (ECB) is pushing for lower interchange fees to boost electronic payments, and banks can't pay Apple without losing money.

Submission + - How to View the SpaceX Falcon 9 Return to Flight at Vandenberg Air Force Base (perens.com)

Bruce Perens writes: Silicon Valley folks should, sometime, take the opportunity to view a launch at Vandenberg Air Force Base. Lompoc is 4-5 hours from the Bay, 2.5 hours from LA if there's ever no traffic. An upcoming SpaceX launch is notable because it's their return to flight, months after their last attempt blew up on the pad during a pre-launch test. Read how to view the launch.

Comment Re: Less politics (Score 1) 110

Eich resigned because of external pressure on the Mozilla organization. I hear that one of the lobbying activities against him was when the dating site "OK Cupid" started informing Firefox users who accessed the site of Eich's activities and that they should download a browser made by people who don't nominate someone with gender discrimination issues to be their CEO. At the time, 8% of OK Cupid customers were there to arrange same-gender meetings.

They felt he was the public face of the company.

Russ Nelson published a piece on what he theorized was the economic motivation of Blacks to be lazy, and was booted off of the Open Source Initiative board. He wasn't thinking about how it would be perceived. A modified version of the piece is still online, but not the version that got him in trouble. In general, executives are seen as the public faces of their organizations even in the case of Nelson, who was not the chairman of the board, but was simply a member of the executive board. In Nelson's case, it wasn't that he made publicity appearances and press releases, it was that he was one of the people with the power to direct the company (and thus a more real face of the company than soneone who just does PR), and folks did not trust that someone who wrote what he did would behave as they would like in that position.

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