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Comment example (Score 1) 70

Uber is actually a good example of what's going wrong with the world: They are openly criminal and it works. It's Al Capone all over again. Everyone knows what they are doing, but they're too slippery to be nailed.

Same with the tax evasion of multinational cooperation, wars based on invented bullshit, election frauds done almost openly (like in Turkey), and so on.

Minority Report may have been on to something: The legal system working after the fact, and with a delay often measured in years, does not deter criminals. If you can take over a country, or become a billionaire, the threat that ten years from now they might file charges which your $1000/h lawyers will then simply drag through the courts for twenty years - well, that is not a very threatening thing especially for people trained to think primarily about next quarter.

Comment Re:Cox has low customer satisfaction? (Score 1) 69

Yeah, I know why they're hated as a cable TV company, but the ISP side of Comcast has always been pretty decent in my experience, and I don't know anyone who has anything bad to say about that side of them. Sure, the data caps is an ongoing concern, but they haven't implemented anything evil on that side, beyond introducing the concept to begin with.

Comment Re:Libreoffice is a thing (Score 1) 197

git is a tiny fraction of what's needed to replace OneDrive - unsurprising given it's a source code version control/management system. If you were to start from scratch creating a OneDrive alternative, you'd probably start with Apache, not git. Add versioning and more advanced permissions to Apache's WebDAV implementation, a web interface to the same directory (preferably linked to something capable of at least viewing Word etc documents online), and client tools to sync with Apache, and you're pretty close to being there.

Comment Re:What do you people expect? (Score 1) 65

Where I used to work, we called this the "Stack Overflow Effect" because so much bad code written by well-meaning people was floating around Stack Overflow that did things in dangerous, security-risky ways, such as telling people to disable TLS chain validation so they could use a self-signed cert for their test environment, then wondering why so many apps shipped with chain validation turned off in the production versions of the app.

I've actually written security documentation whose primary purpose was to provide a single set of code snippets that were known to do things in the right way so that we could plaster Stack Overflow with links to the doc. Then, when people say, "but can't I just...", we can say, "No", and point them atdocumentation explaining why so that at least when they do something stupid anyway, we can say, "Dude, what part of 'no, that is incredibly dangerous' didn't you understand?"

Comment Re:Gov. leaders unsually have no technical knowled (Score 1) 197

"Ranting" and "raging" is infantile behavior.

Hyperbole detection check: Failed. We have eloquently tried to express our concerns and displeasure with this development among mainstream users to gain broader support and failed.

Instead, prepare a set of laws and regulations that we recommend. Get the process started.

And the first thing any politician will ask is whether anyone wants this. The industry doesn't want it? People don't want it? If there is neither money nor votes behind it the proposal is dead on arrival. Besides what would these laws and regulations do, outlaw services? Agreeing to the Windows 10 EULA isn't even close to the stupidest thing you can legally do to yourself. Become a 500lb tub of lard. Get a face tattoo. Be the goatse guy. Proximity flying in a wingsuit. Become a NAMBLA spokesman. The EULA might not even make the top ten.

Comment Re:Why pay the Microsoft tax? (Score 4, Insightful) 197

One thing I've learned over the years is that Slashdot commenters are generally not good at reacting to abuse. Slashdot commenters make excuses, or react to abuse weakly.

I see the last 20 years have done nothing to dampen your idealism, good for you but maybe an ounce of reality wouldn't hurt? Back then your data was local, you had the executable and the only thing you didn't have was the source code to inspect it. Even though things like email went from your server to their server instead of peer to peer, things were pretty distributed and decentralized. Having access to the source code was mostly about being able to fix and extend it, not that it did something nasty.

Not only have consumers ignored open source solutions, they've gone totally the other way. Much of their data lives in the cloud, where they have no control of what's done with it. They use huge, centralized services like Facebook that collects a ton of data. Auto-updating devices download and install new executable code all the time and often rely on online servers. People don't care that they're being tracked and in many cases even accuse those who object of having something to hide. They sign away all rights in mile-long EULAs without thought.

We've ranted. We've raged. We've raised the banners and tried to proclaim YotLD many times. XPs online activation in 2001. Slammer & friends in 2003. Vista in 2006. "Trusted Computing" sometime late 2000s. Windows 8 in 2012. Windows 10 in 2015. Stealth telemetry in all VS apps in 2016. I'm sure there's many more things I've forgotten. I'm sure there's bad things about Apple, Google, Adobe and many others. We've raged out. It's like "OMG OMG Microsoft is... wait, what's the point? Why is anyone going to listen now, when they never have in the past?"

They earn billions of dollars that way. And in between screwing us over they sometime make pretty good software, so yeah... maybe open source is more efficient but one idealist versus a hundred paid developers is unfair teams. So I run Win7 and I got an iPhone. Should it have been Linux and a rooted Android phone? Maybe. But like I said, raged out. If I can't even stand the hassle myself, it's pretty hard to ask anyone else to fight a fight I feel is pretty hopeless. Pretty sure I'm not the only disillusioned ex-revolutionary here.

Comment Re:Libreoffice is a thing (Score 2, Insightful) 197

This is about Microsoft's non-subscription version of Office being able to access the corporate version of OneDrive, so LibreOffice won't help here.

It'd be interesting to see the FOSS community come up with an equivalent to OneDrive (if we could somehow do it without needing a central server, that'd be a major step forward) but a FOSS office suite isn't going to help.

Comment Re:Time to switch (Score 1) 197

Those will still work with the business version of OneDrive after 2020? Or did you misunderstand the summary and think Microsoft is deactivating Office 2016 in 2020 completely?

What Microsoft is announcing is relatively obscure and probably won't affect many people at all. Home users will be completely unaffected. Businesses are largely moving over to Office 365 anyway, the combination of "Corporate OneDrive + non-subscription Office" is pretty unusual.

Switching over to the Mac (or, more easily, to LibreOffice/OpenOffice) won't help in the slightest.

Comment Re: Lots of children have the wrong DNA. (Score 1) 237

It's been quite a while since I was in high school, but I remember a much higher percentage of bastards than that.

Asshats have a much bigger chance of being raised by asshats, nature vs nurture and all that. Being a bastard is just one of those "kick where it hurts" words like that you're fat, have freckles, wear glasses, wrong skin color, have a funny dialect or speech impediment, it's f-f-f-f-f-unny you see. I've been on the receiving end of a lot of teasing but ultimately I've understood it's all about some people's need to establish a pecking order. And I've kicked downwards where maybe I shouldn't, but it felt good to have someone below me. I wasn't very mature at the time and I didn't act very mature.

We act like children are born innocent and all that, but there's a saying that from kids and drunk men you hear the truth. Well from kids and drunk men you're also more likely to get punched in the face. We're far from innocent, we're a bundle of raw emotion caught in a web of civilization. Not behaving like wild animals is a trained behavior. I tend to think we have a far greater capacity for cruelty than anyone really likes to think about, the Nazi concentration camps are but one example. Having done that analysis on myself, if I genuine believed in something... I'm scared to consider how far I'd really go.

Comment Re:Irony of ironies (Score 1) 167

Which is worthless if the payment terminal is compromised, because the card can't know it the payment terminal is sending out messages on its own behalf or on behalf of another hacked payment terminal on the other side of the country.

Transaction log:

  • Terminal 1 gets a chipped card that it recognizes as "special". It contacts a C&C server and finds Terminal 2.
  • Terminal 2 reads the card number from some poor sucker's card and sends it to Terminal 1.
  • Terminal 1 relays the response to the card provider.
  • The bank sends back transaction info.
  • Terminal 1 relays that to Terminal 2.
  • Terminal 2 sends it to that same poor sucker's card for signing, gets the response, and sends it to Terminal 1.
  • Terminal 1 relays the signed response to the card provider.

As far as the card provider is concerned, the card physically present in Terminal 1 was actually used in Terminal 2.

Comment Re:Systemd! (Score 1) 301

As long as it stays as an init program, it's fine because it can be swapped out easily. But if it starts becoming a required component for turning up the volume, that is clearly a sign of poor design.

Well it has to talk to something. I mean we had applications that used to talk directly to the hardware back in the DOS days, this application can talk to Soundblaster and Gravis Ultrasound, I don't want to go back there. So you want to fix it a bit on the hardware side so all the apps can talk to one interface and it'll play on all sound cards. And you want to fix it on the software side so more than one application can play sound at the same time.

And then the ball starts rolling, does it have a hardware mixer? Is it a 5.1 surround setup or a 2.0 headphone? Does it have positional sound? Can it bitstream compressed audio to another device? Can we have ann equalizer? Per-application audio controls? Etc. and so eventually you end up with a form of "sound system service". Eventually you have to decide on a standard.

Comment Re:Lots of children have the wrong DNA. (Score 2) 237

There are plenty of cucks out there

Actually research indicate there aren't, at least not after birth control, legalized abortion and the awareness of DNA tests. Current estimates are 1-3% of the population. The excessively high numbers you get quoted from time to time are because they've self-selected groups where the paternity is in doubt, in these low confidence selections it's 10-30%.

Comment Re:a little late to the party (Score 1) 84

Easy to use. Works well. Tons of features. Free to a point. After that, inexpensive.

After that, not so inexpensive... $14k/core for the Enterprise edition at "no level" list price is pretty harsh. You could build a pretty sweet database server for the licensing money. That said, for an organization that doesn't have any OSS culture and thus doesn't understand anything that doesn't answer an RFQ it's okay. If we somehow managed to get approval for a PostgreSQL server with no vendor backing us up I fear that some sales droid would convince some higher-ups somewhere to go Oracle, DB2, SAP/SAS or Teradata.

Comment Re:Goes to the heart of capitalism (Score 1) 237

If they do not want to be legally held responsible for what the services they do, then the answer is simple - do it for free, with disclaimers about not promissing anything.

Doesn't work that way. You can be held liable for:

Malice: Give away "free candy" with rat poison
Recklessness: Give a free foot rub but confuse the massage oil with caustic soda
Negligence: Give a free house, it collapses and kills someone because of poor foundation work
Strict liability: Give a minor a free blowjob, even if he's got a fake ID

Software mostly gets away with it by saying "these are just blueprints, we're not making any claim they can actually be used for anything". But the moment you start actually doing anything you can't really get away from liability.

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