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Comment Funny bit was the turnover (Score 1) 113

The feeling was that young people had a better promotion path.
Old people might quit.

The reality was that young people repeatedly quit after 2 years so their resume would look like they were "go getters".

The old people kept the department going (including one in his 70s).

The young people turned over like crazy.

Comment Re:The problem isn't that they're old... (Score 1) 113

Expense isn't the issue. OIder employees with similar experience (and similar compensation) are also discriminated against.

It's really blatant in some of the ads.. "Looking for YOUNG, dynamic, candidate who works to deadline" has actually be used by someone who was stupid in placing their ad. Usually they use dog whistles or (Infosys) require your resume have the date you graduated high school (so they can cull you before you wall in the door - and yes it's illegal to do that).

IT is incredibly low status, good play, but lacks a career path for 90% of workers. 20 years is insufficient. Being dumped on the street at 52 when you haven't been saving over half your salary means homelessness and dog food (or public assistance) by the time you are 70.

Avoid IT.

Comment I read the version with the photos (Score 1) 1

I've got to say your camera barely qualifies as a potato.

I used to do the convention thing, but then I realized that all I ever did was gawk at better-dressed people and occasionally spout gibberish at people who are significantly more famous than myself (As an example, back in the 90's I met Brian Jaques and handed him Salamandastron to sign. When he asked me who to dedicate it to, I replied "uh... I dunno?") or embarrass myself by asking really, really stupid questions at panels.

I just realized it's been a decade since I drove half a day to Dallas on a lark and went to A-Kon. Every now and then I think of going to cons again but work hasn't left time for having a life, even a nerdy life such as that maligned by the masses.

Comment Re:Or... (Score 3, Informative) 75

I'm afraid that your "pre-1940s" view of the US is either rose tinted or just plain incorrect. While Teddy Roosevelt spoke of the need to speak softly and carry a big stick, the foreign policy of the United States has been largely the opposite of the isolationist position that many people seem to think is our norm. There's a reason the USMC's Battle Hymn starts with "from the Hallf of Montezuma to the shores of Tripoli." We've invaded both Canada and Mexico in our history, and (prior to the 1940 date you remember fondly) had been at war on every continent save Australia and Antartica. We took the vast majority of our nation away from the people who already lived there. I'm reasonably certain that every single US extraterritorial possession (i.e. Guam, etc) was in our possession prior to the second world war, except for a bunch of tiny atolls in the Pacific we built bases on during the war and maybe kept afterward.

I personally think that, on the whole, we've been a stronger force for "good" (however you want to define that) than "evil" but I do have my biases.

Comment Then there's the Russians (Score 1) 291

There's also that matter of cooperating with a foreign power committing espionage in an effort to influence an election in the U.S. We're supposed to trust that the Russians haven't altered any of those emails? When the source is a foreign intelligence service, that makes Wikileaks a tool.

Comment Re:Six million soon-to-be-unhappy Comcast customer (Score 1) 141

I think you missed the point. In this context, customers refers to individual people and families. Corporations are more important than people, and so, by definition, get better service. It does not contradict the GP who says that a happy Comcast customer is a myth.

I'm the guy who deals with the sales guys, tech guys, field guys and manages the circuits on a day to day basis. To suggest that I'm not a customer is an absurdity. With regard to your schtick that corporte customers are more important because they're "not people" I think it has more to do with the fact that the check we cut Comcast every month probably equals what everyone else in a quarter-mile radius pays, combined.

Comment Solution: Buy legislators. All of them. (Score 5, Interesting) 184

Captain Obvious Competition.

Yep.

These companies already have your money, so updating a device that's already been sold is a needless expense. There's also a good argument to be made that updating a device hurts future sales. If your phone isn't updated, it will start to feel old, so you're more likely to buy a new phone sooner.

Yes. I have a high-end preamp-processor, updatable over the net. Plenty of bugs. Did they ever fix them, much less add new features? No. Did they release a new model? Yes. I have a high-end camera. Updatable over the net. Plenty of bugs. Did they ever fix them, much less add new features? No. Did they release a new model? Yes. I have a high-end radio transceiver. Updatable over the net. Plenty of bugs. Did they ever fix them, much less add new features? No. Did they release a new model? Yes. And so on.

The whole "we can update your device" bit is a scam (and often, so is the "we can update your software" bit.) The only way a corporation is likely to actually update hardware responsibly is if legislation forces them to. And good luck trying to get THAT in place when corporations outright buy the decisions of the legislatures.

Submission + - Free Speech Under Attack as Facebook Plays Judge, Jury, Executioner (techomag.com)

NathanBachman writes: Freedom of speech is under attack, and the perpetrator is none other the king of social media, Facebook. In recent times, the company, now a popular face of online censorship, has been shamelessly blocking accounts, removing pages, and deleting posts that either failed to strike a chord with the moderation team, or were brutally honest to the extent of becoming intolerable for the people in position of power. Will Facebook get away with playing god and silencing millions of pro-Kashmir, pro-Kurdishs, and pro-freedom of speech voices around the globe?

Comment Re:5 is only one generation from current 5X (Score 1) 160

Its generations not phones that matter.

It's not generations that matter either. What matters is the hardware capabilities and the ongoing difficulty of supporting older models with significantly different hardware. (This is why support was dropped early for the Galaxy Nexus: the OEM for the SoC exited the market and made it all but impossible to get updated binary drivers for the GN hardware which would work with kernels later versions depended on.)

The reason why people are rightly upset with this decision is that there is very little hardware difference between the Nexus 5, which is not supported, and the Nexus 5X, which is, making this an arbitrary cutoff most likely motivated more by marketing and an attempt to drive people to buy newer phones (when their old ones are working just fine) than by reasonable technical constraints.

Oh well. There are always 3rd-party ROMs. As small as the hardware differences are it shouldn't take long for someone to port AOSP 7.0 to run on the Nexus 5. It would just have been nice to be able to rely on a reasonable level of ongoing support from the original vendor. Other operating systems, and especially ones based on Linux, tend to run just fine on hardware far older than three years, and smartphone specs are no longer improving at so rapid a pace that a three-year-old device can be presumed obsolete.

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