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Comment Re:I am with Snowden 100% (Score 1) 103

I agree with most of what you say - though hard evidence is not a bad thing, there was a lot of "He said, she said" stuff before the leak proved the DNC was rotten on this issue - but the Turkey data dump was not a Wikileaks thing, despite early reporting suggesting it was. Snowden's almost certainly talking about the release of private information - credit card numbers, private phone numbers and home addresses of donors - that was also in the leak.

Comment Re:Basic Journalism... (Score 1) 103

What modern-day journalist working for anything resembling a respectable newspaper has published the credit card numbers, home addresses, and private phone numbers of their subjects?

Snowden didn't state specifics, but the scandal around Wikileaks release of the DNC emails has generally focused on two things - the possibility it came from Russia (nothing to do with Wikileaks themselves or editing, so unlikely to have been Snowden's concern), and that it included private information about individual - often blameless - people that could cause them serious harm without having anything to do with holding them to account.

Everyone, to the best of my knowledge, is on board with the idea of Wikileaks leaking an email that says "Hi, DWS here! I need a list of ways in which we can secretly handicap Sander's campaign, but remember guys, technically this is illegal so mum's the word!". Fuck DWS. If she goes to prison over this, then nobody's shedding any tears beyond a few die hard Clinton worshipers.

What we're not on board with is "Oh, Jeff Atl called to donate $100 to the general election fund. Could you handle it? His credit card number is 4111 0291 3839 1212, expires 06/17, CVV 971. Address if you need it is 9821 SE Sunflower Rd, Trenton Gardens, NJ 19281." Even if the full email continues "I let him know that with his donation comes a 30 minute meeting with the Secretary of the Environment so he can deal with that little problem his factory is having with the inspectors", we'd at least expect the credit card details and street part of the address redacted.

Comment Re: Translating for the rest of the world (Score 1) 120

Your point?

Some elements end in -um, some in -ium. If you complain about aluminum, then you're a hypocrite for also not complaining about all the others. Americans aren't complaining about all the elements ending in -ium; we have no problem understanding that some are one way and some another, it's only a bunch of dickheads who seem to think they should all end in -ium and complain about this even though a bunch of them don't, and haven't for millenia.

Comment Re:The Latest Innovations (Score 1) 526

Finance? It's go Quickbooks or go home. And they *only* make a Windows version. (No, that online crap doesn't count)

According to another poster here, Quickbooks doesn't work on Windows 10, only Win7.

So saying that we "chose" to use Microsoft is like saying that someone who lives in a cholera infested area "chose" to drink beer, and that attitude won't win you any favours.

I'm not trying to win any favors. I'm actually just laughing at you all as you suffer with all the stuff MS is doing lately, which are the direct results of your own bad choices.

Comment Re:A no-brainer... (Score 1) 433

It's not more secure than Windows 7. How can it be more secure if it leaks your information, without your knowledge, to a third party, AND if the software update mechanism is so user hostile (unrequested reboots, machine slowing to a crawl at random times) that the only workaround is to disable updates completely, either at the firewall or via hacks?

I like a lot about Windows 10, but it's less secure, more resource intensive, and less responsive. I'm keeping Windows 7 machines around in my home for a reason.

Comment Re:Naturally they'll investigate to help HRC. (Score 1) 153

They're not prosecuting, they're investigating. And in terms of them being treated equally - they did investigate HRC, but found there wasn't enough wrongdoing to make it worth prosecuting.

And... it's unlikely the FBI will prosecute any of the hackers, albeit this time because the hackers are likely not within any US court's jurisdiction.


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Comment Who Cares? Let the Market Decide (Score 1) 91

If it's a government entity, yeah, full disclosure, down to the last comma separated value. A public company? That's between them and the share holders. Private company, disclose whatever they want or not. In the end, there'll be some consumer watchdog outfit that will publish all the up and down time percentages and companies will reap their desserts. Unless they're calling me in to fix the problem, I don't care whether they were hacked or somebody's cat pissed on a circuit breaker, they're either up or they are down.

Comment Re:74 at time of crash (Score 1) 600

For one, we're talking about police vehicles here. They're not going to be chasing someone at high speeds and just cruise in a straight line. What if the suspect tries to run them off the road?

Secondly, just because your vehicle can go in a straight line doesn't mean it's safe at that speed. What if you need to swerve or take some evasive action? Now you're looking at a rollover. You really have no business driving that vehicle faster than 55. If you want to drive fast, get a car.

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