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Slashback

Slashback: Reneging, Wandering, Spamming 148

Interested in a free domain for your open-source project? Huh, are ya? "Too bad, sucker," says the .cx registrar. On the other hand, you can drink beer (or sarsparilla) and talk tech with folks smarter than your average bear, create poetry using such fine poetic-sounding things as "Python" and "Java," and even let other people know the names of those who you would call Spammers. Read on, if the gist is really not enough.

See, what we really meant was ... From the inimitable jamie: In February we reported that the .cx registrar was offering free domains to open-source projects. Now, their Board of Directors claims this is "inconsistent with the basic principals [sic] of fairness...this policy has been cancelled." Their FAQ has been changed from this to this accordingly. The board meeting promises "existing registrants will be 'grandfathered-in' and a new second level registry for the oss community will be established." Presumably that means new applicants will get YourOpenSourceProject.free.cx or something. Props to jmason and TBTF for the above links.

LinuxBierwanderungenrundeninkreisen, oder? One of the cool things about Free software is that there's an attitude of joviality and conviviality among its users and developers -- as evidenced by the recurring Linuxbierwangerungen, as reported in Slashdot last week. Even the WSJ notices, evidently: alanw writes "This article is fairly accurate, although we were mostly drinking real ale, not lager."

The article also mentions the oh-so-intriguing idea of simultaneous, net-linked Bierwanderungen on different continents. I vote for the mountains of Maine, New Hampshire or Tennessee as good trial U.S. locations -- if you know any organizers, make sure they leave comments below about a U.S. Bierwanderung!

Opting in, Sir? Opting out? Headphones, Sir? Red Wine? White wine? discHead writes "The Mail Abuse Prevention System has announced that a temporary restraining order filed to prevent them from listing Harris Interactive in the Realtime Blackhole List has been denied."

So long as no one is required to abide by the list that MAPS creates of mail abusers, would a restraining order preventing them from listing a spammer (by their definition) ever work? I rather hope not.

No, not the envelope with "those" pictures, the envelope with the winners! Tim McNerney writes: "The second round winners in the Software Carpentry competition have been announ ced. Though the test harness category got dropped in the process, the config, build and track categories all have winners along with judge's commentary. Next step is to choosing developers to implement the winners." And speaking of lucky winners (you may not already be a winner, in this case), at0m writes "The Haiku Generator Challenge has been completed, and the results have been posted. For those who are not familiar with the contest, the goal was to create a program that used a user-inputted RDF file and created three lines with 5, 7, and 5 syllables respectively. To see the winning entries, visit the challenge page. dotcomma has also announced a new, less difficult challenge, which can be found here."

This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Timothy, /back: www.YourOpenSourceProject.cx

Comments Filter:
  • by psm ( 105737 )
    Drunk Linux users
    Will forget to register
    .cx domains
  • Ist dieses ein deutsches Klassenzimmer?
  • Ok this may seem a little extreme but how much spam do you actually get?

    Lemme tell you.

    On my Hotmail account, I get 8-10 pieces of spam per day, 2-3 of which aren't filtered out by their anti-spam agents. Their anti-spam system sends spam to a "bulk mail" folder.

    On my Earthlink account, I was averaging 12-15 pieces of spam per day before they started using the Brightmail [brightmail.com] spam filtering. Now, it's 3-5 per week (I quit going to the brightmail site to check the spam count).

    The other four accounts I have get maybe 5-7 pieces a week total. I have no idea if any of my web presence providers use anti-spam tools.

    It is your problem and your problem alone to deal with.

    Quite right. Which is why I was going to dump Earthlink until they added the anti-spam tools.

    I should not have to take a stand just because a group of people who don't check their email once every 6 monts complain about getting email.

    The reason Earthlink and others have added anti-spam tools, and why things like the RBL are popular, is because their customers requested it. If you like spam, that's great -- sign up with a provider that doesn't filter, or that allows you (like both Earthlink and Hotmail do) to turn off their anti-spam filters.

    Email is not just for personal communication and more of an informational delivery system which actually sees more traffic I would wager from mailinglists and other forms of batch oriented traffic.

    E-mail may be just another delivery system to you, but to me, it's how I communicate with friends, family, and my customers. Yes, I subscribe to a couple of mailing lists that send me about 150 messages a day. But there's no forged headers, the message clearly states who it's from, and I can easily create rules that allow me to send these messages to their appropriate folders in my mail client.

    I don't mind commercial e-mail -- I get a few messages each week from vendors whose products I've purchased, and I appreciate hearing from them. But unsolicited commercial e-mail is not wanted. If I (and G*d only knows why, given the crap that's being peddled by most UCE) wanted these products, I'd hunt for them on the web.

    Your arguments about freedom of speech and expression are sadly misplaced. You can get all the spam you want by doing a little research on your "informational delivery system" provider. Just as you state spammers are free to express themselves by sending out their information, I'm free to use any and all tools at my disposal (including picking an e-mail provider that thinks, as I do, that spam is a blight) to ignore them.

    You oughta be thrilled at things like the Colorado anti-spam legislation, after all, if spam was clearly marked, it would be even easier for individuals to make their own personal decision on how to handle UCE, without having to involve their e-mail provider. My guess is you're just a spammer yourself and hate the idea. After all, if this idea spread, everybody would make the decision to trash the stuff, and you wouldn't be able to make a buck telling all those fools that you can mail to 300 million e-mail address info about their products.

    Actually, I think I've been trolled. I mean, come on, 2400baud? Sheet, reply to this with a valid e-mail addy and I'll dig around and see if I've still got a 14.4 laying around I can send you (it's external, not a winmodem, so it should work on Linux or on any box with a serial port).

  • Locking the tenent out was illegal. Not Locking anyone out was not.
    Actually, it probably was. A landlord has a legal responsibility to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and security to his or her tenants - making sure all the doors can be locked, for example. The idea is to give people some legal recourse against slum lords and lazy landlords, I guess.

    Anyway, I agree with everything else you said, just wanted to point that out.

  • They are not using C or C++. They are using Python.

    What changes would you make to the language to make a better build tool? Whether a language has a "good module based interface" has little to do with a good build tool. A build tool keep track of dependancy between modules and builds the modules that need to be built during developement. There are several good solutions to these problems, but I doubt that a change in the language will make any significant difference.

    The COM/ActiveX problems are/were caused because Microsoft did not know what the hell they were doing. Look at CORBA for a better solution.

    Troy
  • Sysadmins can choose to censor inbound mail to their customers. It's their bandwidth, there servers, etc. Just like the phone company can block incoming calls to your home phone whenever they want to, and your landlord can lock you or whoever else out of your house because you're just renting it, it's *the landlords* house.

    And it's not your bandwidth, it's your upstreams. Just remember that when they decide to censor you because of an opinion, or the type of content on your servers. In the end, Worldcom is going to be able to control what you say. You're laying the groundwork for it.

    RBL is censorship. If you support RBL, you have to admit that some censorship is ok.

  • I don't consider promotional ads for products and services that I may want to be spam. Therefore I don't receive spam at all.
  • > Didn't Colorado recently pass an anti-spam law?

    Yeah but it was one of those lame "must start with ADV" things. Unenforceable across state lines, incompatible, etc.

    I did find it kind of amusing that Qwest does use the ADV subject in their emails to me, even though I'm a subscriber to their ISP service, so they don't really need to. Already raises my opinion of them from the rock bottom USWest occupied.
  • MAPS and Harris are both in the US, so like US laws apply to them.

    Pull you head out and look around.

    Moron.

  • Seattle, Portland, and Denver (if you can tolerate Coors) would also be good locations. Austin has good beer, but the "wanderung" part would suffer :-)
    --
  • It's not that hard. You don't want that email hit the Delete key and bam it's gone
  • Hey, at least with these "Ivory tower 'intellectuals'" if I think they're wrong, I can edit the list myself or even not use it at all. If I don't like what a judge does, I can ... uh, vote for the person who will get to appoint a new judge after this one dies of old age?


    ---
  • As a new sys-admin I definitely have to agree with Jonathan. I want to see our good buddy sips try to get a pissy SPARC10 running Solaris back up after some clueless jerk in the IT department of your data center decides the best way to turn an alarm off is to kill power to the entire building. (Does this sort of thing happen to everyone?)

    Anyway, right on, Jonathan! And would you like to borrow my big huge Redneck2000 Shotgun to punk this guy with? :-)
  • well, when i wrote in asking about the new policy, the kind admins at nic.cx crediting my OSS account with 5 years.

    it obviously wasn't their decision.
  • What evidence do you have? Name any country in the world and I can name at least 10 things wrong with it.
  • Alot of people have to pay by the minute for their internet connections, so downloading and reading spam costs money. In places like Europe, Africa, Australia, etc, an Internet connection is expensive.

    Personally I don't pay by the minute, but spam is still annoying as hell.

  • by Guy Harris ( 3803 ) <guy@alum.mit.edu> on Wednesday August 09, 2000 @04:09PM (#866254)
    nic.cx [nic.cx] says it's for Christmas Island [whois.nic.cx].

    As does the English country names and code elements page [www.din.de] on the ISO 3166 Maintenance Agency Web site [www.din.de]. (The French country names and code elements page [www.din.de] says it's "CHRISTMAS, ÎLE".)

  • Hmm, consider me interested... What kind of contract would that give me? Would I be owner of the domain (with my fee being for .cx nameserver usage), or would I be renting the name from you? (Technically it would be the same, but not legally). Do you have some kind of acceptable use for domains, (as nic.cx later got)?
  • If I would have known about this eailer I would have grabbed one. Free is always good...
    until (succeed) try { again(); }
  • Don't you LOVE the IDIOTS that try to get First Post using their account [slashdot.org] logins? I think it's hilarious.

    It really shows the mentality/maturity behind some of our "peers".

    to tiny69: Get a life. I for one hope you get your account cancelled, and have your IP address blocked from accessing this site. Not necessarily because you are a "FIRST POSTER!" (that is a big part however), but that you were *stupid* enough to do it LOGGED IN!

    First Posting is childish. But to use your account is just plain stupid. From here out, everyone knows *exactly* how to judge everything you say.

    Hope it was worth it.

    -- Give him Head? Be a Beacon?

  • I was just thinking about that and was going to supply a really nice one, but got the following message;

    Lameness filter encountered. The following post, though comprised of 3 lines- 5, 7, and 5 syllables respectively does not reference a season! Try again next fall, eh bub?


    Guess /. has finally started thinking proactively about the spammers here :/
  • by Anonymous Coward
    Indeed. They'll know to judge anything he has to say as the thoughts of a somewhat reckless and playful sort, who doesn't take the whole 'Slashdot Community' thing so seriously that he's afraid of having some fun once in awhile.

    That qualifies him as someone considerably more interesting that a lot of you stiff wooden sorts.

    -------------
    Why do you scramble your email up there? Can't you just type out shadowfire@hotmail.com and be harvested like the rest of us?
  • This atricle [newswire.com.au] says that Namezero has canned their agreement with INA to register domains through them. So if you sign up for a domain now, you probably won't get it for a while... I don't see why they just don't use their venture capital to register domains as an official registar!
  • One thing that I've got say for Americans is that we DO stuff. We're competitive, we are smart and innovative, we do more than talk, we DO.

    Like Microsoft ?

  • by SvnLyrBrto ( 62138 ) on Wednesday August 09, 2000 @08:42PM (#866262)
    > Sysadmins can choose to censor inbound mail to
    > their customers. It's their bandwidth, there
    > servers, etc

    Unless contractually bound otherwise, yeppers. You might try reading your service agreement with your ISP. Spam is expressly FORBIDDEN in most every one I've come across.

    >Just like the phone company can block incoming
    >calls to your home phone whenever they want to,

    If you don't pay your bill, they can and will. Otherwise, nope... the telcos operate a public utility, not a PRIVATE network. Even though the phoneCo may, itself, be a company, not a utility comission, special restrictions and obligations are placed upon it in exchange for it's having a monopoly and for the right to run its lines on the public right of way.

    >landlord can lock you or whoever else out of your
    >house because you're just renting it, it's *the
    >landlords* house.

    Under the correct circumstances, he can. Your lease is a *CONTRACT* between you and your landlord. Quit paying your rent, and yep, you'll be evicted in no time flat. OTOH, if he locks you out just because he's feeling contrary that day, you can have his ass in court.

    >Worldcom is going to be able to control
    >what you say.

    Nope. Worldcom has common carrier status. Read up on it. They share similar legal protections and obligations as a phoneCo.

    >RBL is censorship. If you support RBL, you have to
    >admit that some censorship is ok.

    Nope. RBL is simply a list of IPs that spam out junk mail to people who don't want it. Essentially, it is a list of reviews, nothing more, nothing less. Refusing to carry trafic from those assholes is no morally different than buying a copy of Zagats Restraunt Guide at Borders, and refusing to eat at any place where the reviewer got salmonella.

    john

    Resistance is NOT futile!!!

    Haiku:
    I am not a drone.
    Remove the collective if

  • That would be something your ISP needs to take care of then. The DUL (MAPS Dial-up User List) is the only decent list out of the bunch.

    It's purpose is to stop spammers sending mail directly to port 25 on the receiving server while using a dynamically assigned IP address. Your ISP at one time noted your IP block as dynamically assigned. If it now is not, they need to fix it.


    --
    Turn on, log in, burn out...
  • by Anonymous Coward
    It isn't the time wasted downloading the spam.

    It's the time spent sighing in exasperation, the time spent searching fervently for the "BLOCK ASSHOLE SPAMMER FROM EVER SENDING ME THIS PIECE OF CRAP UNWANTED EMAIL" button, the time not finding such a miraculous button (why the hell not? I'm Joe F. Public and I WANT THIS! ), the time spent settling for "BLOCK THIS SPOOFED NAME @spammers.have.feelings.too.com, the time spent sighing again because I know it's futile (you WILL spam me again, garaunteed), the time spent finding the delete forever and permanently banish button, the time spent again settling again for delete-for-now-get-bitched-at-by-SySAdmin-later-fo r-accumulating-mythical-sized-trash-file -combo! button, the time spent then moving on to the next piece of spam, (the most recent being some cagey bastard at @homeowners.cx, may he rest forever in hell the lying scumball leech), the time spent composing Joe Fuqing Public bitch letters on SlashDot.

    THATS WHAT WE ARE FUCKING ANNOYED BY.
  • by kwsNI ( 133721 ) on Wednesday August 09, 2000 @03:14PM (#866265) Homepage
    What assholes. They'll probably give us:
    YourOpenSourceProject.goatse.cx.

    kwsNI
  • Sorry but so called "passive OPT-IN" does not equal Opt-IN. By making their opt-in boxes checked by default they are relying on people not taking the time to read the entire web page when signing up for a service or just overlooking the check boxes all together.

    If I signed up for a webmail services and happend to miss a checkbox that automatically signed me up for a daily rush of unwanted mail to my account, does NOT mean that I either asked to be on it, or even wanted to be on it in the first place.

    Also remember that people subscribing to and using services like MAPS, are simply deciding what type or who they will accept email from onto their own "private" servers. Even alot of TOS's of isp's will state that not only do they not allow sending spam from their servers, they don't have to accept it on their servers either. If a customer doesnt like it they are more than able to use another mail service, whether thats web based, remote pop3 or just switching to another isp all together.

    The last thing I ever want is some government organisation telling me what I'm allowed or not allowed to accept or block on servers that I own and my private property.

  • I believe censorship, at least in my mind, would cover information that I ask to look at. If I ask to look at a certain document lets say, and half of it is gone, and I cannot get access to it, then that is censorship. I cant see having a way to stop email that I dont even want to get to me, no way for me to say, "i dont want your crap, leave me alone".

    If I want to buy something, I will chose a place that I want, I feel that if a company has to stoop to the level of sending out spam, then I dont need to do buisness with them. I bet many other people do the same, I wonder if they know about that.

    If you want your spam, use hotmail!

    Geist

  • by Kalrand ( 177637 ) on Wednesday August 09, 2000 @03:16PM (#866268)
    Drunken German Linux users reading computer generated spam written as haikus from a ripoff .cx server.

    Did I miss anything?

    Kalrand

    -the voice of reason
  • That, or you could go to cjb.net and get a subdomain forwarded to your host, with no banner that takes up 1/3 of your screen, no spam, no giving your personal details.

    Think about it, once you sign up with namezero, that domain you chose is THEIRS! When you win the lottery, you can't go out and buy that domain you wanted, you have to negotiate with THEM to get it!

    I'd rather stick with a subdomain (so you get an extra cjb bit in your url, who cares?) then get the real thing when you want to pay for it.


    ---
  • What country is .cx for?
  • See Taco, this is why we should remove the karma limit. Anyone with karma over 50 can FP at +1 for life and never loose any karma because it's frozen.

    kwsNI
  • Yes in general an average person can indeed to a job such as that.
    And we're not saying otherwise. We're saying that sleeping in one's chair or playing Quake for 8/5 is not being a sys-admin.
    Checklists and procedures and other various well documented regimented actions can do most of the work for you.
    No, they just specify the work, they don't do it for you. Flashing a Cisco 7500 series router a book-of-procedures and saying "Config Thyself" doesn't work. Then there are build-outs in new locations, new equipment to be phased in, and all sorts of other things that can't be covered in SOP manuals because they haven't been done before. And before you even start with the "but I'm talking about the everyday work" BS, let point out that the #1 jobs of an admin on a growing network (ie: most networks out there) are build-outs and designs. Most of us have interns that do the: "Step 1: Eject tape. Step 2: Write-enable new tape. Step 3: Insert new tape. Step 4: Press RETURN" stuff for us. For those of us who don't, well, it sucks to be us. For the actual admin, everything lies on being able to integrate new hardware to the network yesterday, and deciding what networking hardware to order for the new glitzy multimedia conference room, and how many tons of A/C to put in the new room housing the compute-server farm.
    With a proper distro like debian it's a breeze.
    Uhm... Right. You hold on just a sec there whilst I load up Debian on a Sun E3500 or an SGI Origin 200 cluster. Sorry, pal. Some of us have to live with running substandard (sarcasm) operating systems like IRIX or Solaris because we need automated failover, system partitioning, journalizing filesystems, good SMP performance, and other feature-bloat (sarcasm).
    For those people who like to kill their homepages just have a well documented backup facility of the homapge[sic] files and then have a script (which a unix novice could write by the way) that would just take the files that were owned by the customeer and have them put into his/her directory.
    And still run it myself now, when John Q. Clueless needs it run. That doesn't save me from getting out of bed and, at the very least, logging into a secure remote terminal. What if he deleted it a week ago, and just noticed today? I still need to go to the office and change tapes. Or do we just give the script access to the whole tape library, let it change tapes, and setuid it so that any user can run it and restore his/her own files? After all, there're no security holes in setuid shell-scripts. Most OSes just have them disabled to soothe your local administrative thug.
    Oh and if you really hate your job all that much I need some experience and I think a little boot polishing works wonders instead of bitching about my job every day.
    Who's bitching? I love my job, even when I have to deal with lusers. I live for the day when I can build a network under-budget with a lifespan of twice what we estimated because I found a way to re-use our existing infrastructre, rather than ripping out all the old and putting in the new shiny buttons. I'm proud of my network, and the fact that it's run without a peep for the last 24 months (knock on wood), except that time the clueless telco engineer (from SWBell) pulled the emergency-power-out lever in the datacenter. You're sitting over there telling us that we sit around with our thumbs up our asses, shoving Twinkies in our faces while we spend all day staring at the blinkenlights. We're just saying that our job, like any other, involves work that we can be damned proud of. And an "Ah-fscking-men" to the needing experience. You talk as if your entire knowledge of the sysadmin world comes from installing Debian and watching the "admins" behind the glass window of your local network installation. Here's a clue: Those guys aren't the admins. The admin is the guy in the telco room splicing fibre by hand (yes, I know a guy who can do this with stunning accuracy -- he's my cable guy).
    Also check out freshmeat and look at some of the various sysadmin tools there for unix machines (I assume that you are running) and you will find several for mass machine analysis of various daemons and problems. Hell some of them can even send data to you beloved pages (no I have never had one heard they can cause pacreatic cancer).
    Linux is not Unix. And, for that matter, there's a lot more to the care-and-feeding of a network than knowing Unix. Sending data to a pager is as simple as editing /etc/syslog.conf. That's old-hat. Call me when you get another wunderskript. Have you ever tried running those nifty tools in an environment more complex than "Joe-Blow's Network-o-Five-Linux-Boxen"? Ever see one completely mangle an NIS+ database? Not pretty. Fact is, most admin software is site-specific and needs to be at least partially rewritten for every company, or every department. Rarely are two network identical enough in hardware, software, purpose, design, and topography that the same admin software will perform admirably on both. Note: I didn't say "okay", I said "admirably". One does not sys-admin half-assed, or one gets one's half-an-ass kicked out the door.
    But cheer up sooner or later someone will take that job off your hands.
    Woe be the day that you sit in that chair. You're too fucking lazy to be an admin.
  • Interestingly, if Harris were to somehow win this one it would probably be worse for them than if they lost it.

    First, granting an injunction on the RBL would be prior restraint and is pretty unlikely in any case.

    Second, refusing to grant the preliminary injunction is also the judge's way of saying "Look, you guys aren't going to win anyway."

    Unfortunately MAPS didn't just post the damn actual ruling (I like that better than idiot-simple non-lawyer explanations of what a judge said), but I bet it has something about "likelihood of prevailing on the merits" with judge-talk for "not bloody likely" somewhere near it.

  • There should be a requirement that administrators who censor email make full disclosure to their customers of what they're doing.

    Censorship is based on contents. RBL blocking is based on blocking mail from servers that have forwarded a lot of unwanted e-mail and still do even after the RBL administrators have contacted the server operator to stop this.

    Having said that, there are good ways to mark e-mail as being from a server that is in the RBL so users can use procmail to filter that out or move to a 'spam' folder. I think that is the better way to go for services like this so users can select whether to use certain filters or not.

  • Yes, it is possible to invest a lot of time and effort in coming up with configuration tools and build tools for C/C++. But I think such an approach is not rational.

    Configuration and build tools become a lot easier if you modify the language itself to have a decent module system, and create well-defined module-based interfaces for the different platforms. I would claim that the amount of time and effort to fix C/C++, and the amount of retraining required for programmers is small compared to a solution that doesn't change the language and instead relies on external tools to do half a job with what will end up being a much more complex tool.

    Something similar happened with COM/ActiveX: nominally, COM/ActiveX software is written in plain C/C++. But no C/C++ programmer can write COM/ActiveX software; instead, they have to learn what amounts to a whole new language and runtime. There, too, a modification to the language would have been overall more rational.

    Yes, for lots of political reasons people like to cling to the illusion that tools and languages are separate, and that they can stay backwards compatible if they don't touch the language. But that really is an illusion, and one that costs the industry dearly in the long run.

    In a nutshell, my message to the Software Carpentry would be: we have had enough half-baked solutions like this. Think about how to fix C and add a decent module system and correct cross-module type checking to the language itself. Something like that should be implementable as a simple "xC" to C translator and work across platforms, and it can probably even be backwards compatible in most areas that count.

  • by Anonymous Coward
    The RBHL is a racket, similar to the KKK who networked in earlier eras of US history. RICO should be invoked against them.

    Spam is not a crime. Bandwidth is not a public commons. The end result of Spam should be a bandwidth fee for all outgoing transmissions, not a silly little band of Sysadmins who have no business blocking people's recipt of email.

    We'll arrive there soon, in any case, as the 'consensus' model for the Internet is creaking like an old wooden roller coaster in the wind. Hope you've had a fun ride, geeks. It's soon going to end.

  • You can already get a free domain name from namezero.com. They forward to your web-host, and you just have to put up with a small advert frame at the bottom.

    Yup. There are a couple of drawbacks, however (in addition to the ad frame). You can't set up your own DNS. In other words, you can't set up blah.mydomain.com to point to 111.222.111.222, etc. This means that you can't set up any kind of server for use with this domain, whether a mail, WWW, IRC, ... server. There is an interface through which you can add xxx@mydomain.com, but as with the www.mydomain.com aliases NZ offers, they are only forwarding aliases and nothing more. Not that I'm putting NZ down (I happen to have an NZ domain), I'm just pointing out that NZ domain != 'real' domain.

    =================================
  • And so I must wonder if this concern only projects under the GPL? What I fear most is a rise of partisanship in the handling of the assignment of domain names like theses ones, as well as some of the newly proposed extensions like .net, .jobs and the like.

    I hope you made a mistake... .net isn't exactly a new TLD :)

  • by Anonymous Coward
    Where is the convenient means for service subscribers to opt out of the RBL?

    There should be a requirement that administrators who censor email make full disclosure to their customers of what they're doing. There's a Fraud angle that could be taken to shut the RBL down, or at least make it an option at the user, rather than the self righteous sysadmin level.
  • There's a lot more to the .cx story than is obvious. The people who made the sensible offers some time ago (and the happy smiling people of the charming South Seas island of Bollo) aren't the same registrars as the current money-grabbing leeches.

    .cx was fun while it lasted.

  • Harris' list might be an OPT-IN list but its not structured as a "double opt in" which MAPS require. Without a double opt in mechanism it is too easy for unscrupulous individuals to fake opt-ins on behalf of third parties who actually do not want to opt in.

    Without a double opt-in I could go to the Harris web site and fill in the opt-in form with "lk@caralis.com". Assuming that email is legit :) it has been added to the Harris database as an "opt-in" subscriber and will receive the full amount of traffic sent.

  • I presume you mean those:

    "You have opted in on one of our web servers or.."

    type things? I get spam from those all the time, often several times, despite a claimed 'one time only mailing' since 'signing up'. Of course I never have signed up, I've never registered interest, and one of the addresses has only ever posted to _one_ newsgroup a couple of times.

    So either a) they trawl newsgroups with an address harvester, or b) they get someone with a harvester to register the interest...

    I think the opt-in in question was probably sending to people who hadn't signed up. Personally I think it's fine to blackhole them for it. I also think it's fine to blackhole entire sites due to one of their users - since then you can pretty much be sure that they _will_ get rid of the user as opposed to just ignoring it.
  • >Sysadmins can choose to censor inbound mail to their customers.
    >It's their bandwidth, there servers, etc. Just like the phone
    >company can block incoming calls to your home phone whenever
    >they want to, and your landlord can lock you or whoever else
    >out of your house because you're just renting it, it's *the landlords* house.

    In a situation where you pay a telephone company to receive a phone line or a landlord to live in a building you have the right to expect a certain level of service.

    In reality, sysadmins filtering junk email is directly akin to the post office filtering out your mail. Which in the the UK, they do (for a nominal fee). People like the fact that they do that, they like it so much they PAY the post office to take out the junk mail.

    It's worth bearing in mind, that if ORBS and RBL were not implimented, then we would all receive *much* more spam than most of us already do, which (for midsize to large ISPs) GB's more worth of hard diskspace and MB's more worth of bandwidth, which would drive the costs up for customers. And, top this, users who pay per-min connection fees would have to pay to download this junk (which they will promptly filter out and trash).

    I don't know about you, but it seems lot more sensible for ISP's and sysadmins to filter it out, rather than force the users to do it themselves.
    --

  • As there are open source projects scattered everywhere I thought that setting up in .cx might be a good collecting place. Did not end up as the ideal but I am sitting still till 2005 at least.

    If you have a software project you get listed pretty easy, if your project does not fir under software or is a mixture of soft/firm/hard then make sure you get an entry into open collector [opencollector.org]

    If people would like to have a domain off of mine then maybee something could be worked out. (can't do it yet as I don't host my own content, is framed out from .cx; but if a few people are interested then it could happen)

    cya, Andrew...

  • Really? I thought it was because it sounded like 'sex' when you said it.
  • Every recognised country has it's own two letter domain. (like the seldome used .us) Some enterprisng folks have noticed certain handy ones like the .to demain used by the welcome.to people. In virtually all of these cases however, these are poor Third World nations lacking in either awareness, tech, and/or funds to properly use their domains for thier own benefit. So the usual scenario is that a foreign company comes in and buys the rights to the entire country's domain for a song, virtually hijacking the country's entire web space for their own use.

  • Okay, so MAPS needs an overseas (hmmmm... HavenCo perhaps?) mirror. Or hell, if HavenCo works out as promised, relocate the RBL there entirely.

    It could be ironic. IIRC, HavenCo has committed to being a good netizen and disallowing spam. But what if they had decided on a total free-for-all and gave spammers the green light?

    It would've been funny as hell if the RBL that /dev/null's spammers was located in the same CoLo as the spamming servers themselves.

    Oh well, just a little bit of irony that I'm sure we'll never get to savor.

    john
    Resistance is NOT futile!!!

    Haiku:
    I am not a drone.
    Remove the collective if

  • cay like in cayman.
    Uh....what was that about the rest?

    Kalrand

    -the voice of reason
  • What's the info?
  • Throw asside the "You have no choice if your ISP uses it" argument. Ask your ISP before joining. Good idea for both sides sence your better off with ISP side filtering if you like filtering.
    But it's not really IMAPS fault so much as AboveNet who uses it for peer filtering. That means any traffic that might go through them.
    It's been said you can bypass AboveNet but exactly how you bypass any commen net carryer... let alone a backbone... is a carefully guarded secret.
    No someone else handles my route tables and thats normal.. anyway such a procedure is the same as opt out and give it up thats exactly the problem we have with spam...

    But.... AboveNets abuse of the list is something for a spammer to take up with Above not with RBL.
    RBL presents a list for volintary filtering. Thats it's designed intent thats it's goal. Thats what the corts should look at.
  • OpenNIC supports the .oss domain, whose intent is for open source projects.

    For more info, goto:
    http://www.opennic.unrated.net/ [unrated.net]

  • If you don't mind owning a .com.country domain, then there's a really free alternative: nic.ar.

    They let you register any .com.ar domain for free. .ar stands for Argentina, but what the heck, it's not worse than having a Christmas Islands domain!

    http://nic.ar

    The main page is in Spanish, but if you take a carefull look, it has an English link that will have all the info translated.

    The procedure to register a domain with them is not very simple and it takes around a week until it's working properly. If anyone needs help, you can mail me and I will explain the procedures and the forms to fill in.

    And again: they don't charge any fees. Null, nothing, zero money to have your own domain.

  • Er, offtopic? How the hell is anything in a slashback offtopic? The guy was telnetting into a linux box while wandering around some mountains (shouldn't you be using ssh?) Waldoj doesn't say whether beer was consumed. Pretty damn close to the Linuxbierwanderung, no?
  • I think what may be the best location for a Linuxbierwanderung in the US would be Wisconsin. Think about how many breweries there are in Milwaukee alone (why do you think the baseball team is named the Brewers, after all?). Here in Madison, I work less than one block from a local brewer, and I've been to three others on the isthmus downtown....
  • It makes me wonder if someday some spammer could raise a stink and actually successfully get such a restraining order. Maybe it would be a good idea for the list to be distributed across multiple jurisdictions.


    Just to be sure that no one who has gotten a restraining order issued is accidentally contained on any of those lists, it will be necessary to keep another list:


    There are currently valid restraining orders prohibiting inclusion of the following addresses in the list. Any such addresses must be removed from all copies:

    foo.bar.com
    spam.twice.a.day.com
    ...

  • Hmm... now I agree that the gov't made the right decision. But suppose for a second that they had granted it (or that in trial it ends up being so they have to remove the name)... would that not set a great precedent for any company to sue, say CyberPatrol, for blocking their site? It would be the same type of thing - a service people can chose to use blocking data from a site based on their opinion of it. (Can they do this now, I wonder?)
  • Colorado covered two important points:

    1/ It is a crime to fake/disguise/whatever the originating address

    2/ All spam must have "ADV:" as the first three characters of the subject line.

    Both ideas have been tossed around for a while, nationally and internationally. Pity it had to be a US state doing this, rather than the federal US gov'mint, but anyway, it's done. Now to see how the enforcement of it works... I wouldn't be surprised to see plenty of places (i.e. every SysAdmin/ISP/node) just not forwarding the ADV: junk. Trivial exercise. And 99.999% of the net community would support them. 'Rights' to free speech, et al, are not really infringed by requiring these scum-sucking !$$#$$ to stick four characters at the beginning of their spiels. My gawd, AOL might actually run at something approaching normal speeds!

  • dhs.org is another good solution... My brother uses cjb for website redirection, I use dhs for box DNS. Good stuff.

    --
  • One thing that I've got say for Americans is that we DO stuff. We're competitive, we are smart and innovative, we do more than talk, we DO.

    Setting something up in the USA doesn't mean it's US centralist, it means we want it here, and why shouldn't we have it? US based companies started the PC industry. We're just continuing the good work.

    Don't take it personally.

    Fook
  • The only reason the .cx thing got posted is because of everybody's favorite website, goatse.cx. As an open source project (bear with me on this one) they're losing their free domain, and will need to find a new one. How about goatse.sourceforge.net? Or maybe even just [sourceforge.net]? (Though if we're lucky, it'll be [slashdot.org]goatse.slashdot.org [slashdot.org]. Of course, there's always good old fashioned goatse.cjb.net [cjb.net], or come.to/goatse [come.to].

    Ah well,...

  • That's being unfair. I liked the free domain policy, and will probably end up being good for .cx in the end, but if they don't want to give their domains away, that's their right.

    FYI, this policy change came about because the original .cx registrar, niccx.com, recently had their monopoly removed, and a bunch of conditions forced upon them.

    Here's a snippet from an email they sent out recently to .cx domain holders: The main reasons for this are as follows:

    We at NICCX.COM have finally decided not to become a registrar in the new shared registry system that is currently being developed by Dot CX.

    - Most of you have told us they wouldn't accept to pay any more money for their cx domain. A substantial increase of registry fees would be inevitable if we were to participate in the shared registry.

    - We have always tried to be 'the registrar with a difference'. The terms and conditions for registrars in the new registry system wouldn't leave us too many options on how we handle registrations. For instance we wouldn't be able to offer 'test registrations' (ie. you register and set up your domains first, and pay only after it's all working), or free/discounted domains for certain groups (open source developers, CX residents, etc) anymore.

  • by SvnLyrBrto ( 62138 ) on Wednesday August 09, 2000 @05:13PM (#866302)
    >Spam is not a crime.

    I beleive it is in some places. Didn't Colorado recently pass an anti-spam law? In any case it IS a civil, if not criminal offence. AOL's single redemming quality is that they have in the past, and continue to, sucessfully sue many spammers.

    >Bandwidth is not a public commons.

    (almost) Exactly the point. It's private property.

    >band of Sysadmins who have no business blocking
    >people's recipt of email.

    Here is where you are flat-assed wrong. I have EVERY business doing whatever the hell I please.

    It is *MY* hardware.

    It is *MY* software.

    It is *MY* bandwidth.

    It is *MY* root login.

    I have every right to refuse to carry traffic from yesmail, harris, or from any other fool. I can pass said traffic to the designated receiver, send it to Zimbabwe, or drop it into /dev/null. I can CHOOSE not to block ANY spam, I can CHOOSE to use the MAPS RBL, I can CHOOSE to use someone else's blacklist, or I can CHOOSE to compile my own list of spammers. It's *MY* hardware, and *MY* bandwidth.

    You don't like that? Tough cookies. Unless you and I have a contract that says otherwise, if you don't like my policies, you're more than welcome to take a long walk off pier39 into the bay.

    john
    Resistance is NOT futile!!!

    Haiku:
    I am not a drone.
    Remove the collective if

  • Tiny69 isn't the only one that needs to get a life.

    Now I shall remember the name Accipiter as a boring self-righteous idiot. Although, given your .sig, you didn't need to even type anything to put that across.

  • Ok this may seem a little extreme but how much spam do you actually get? I get my email all the time and I run at 2400 baud and it never is that anoying. The one thing that can be considered defamatory and restraining communication is where an ISP impliments this type of thing over a customers mail system without their specific concent. Suppose I have many legitimate users on said blocked machine? Well that means that I cannot recieve any mail from them at all. The blackhole list should be implimented as a user option for each mailserver account and not for the entire ISP. I assume an enterprising lawyer could make a statement that restricting an individual user's account from receiving certain sites or receiving data from certain servers is pure and simple descrimination. On the stupid usenet thing. Usenet is a really crappy protocol which really needs more redundancy built in. I personally have never bothered with it in some time unless it's through mailandnews.com's servers (do they adopt the standards of the death sentence?). At any rate you could say that perhaps if an individuals service is in fact hampered by (to take a real life idiom say a group of hippies protesting in your neighboorhood and your bills are late because of said action or you never get your package, etc) What there should be is a massive government funded backbone wherein the actions of private individuals have no bearing on the actions of the whole. Suppose a group of say extremists wants to block you getting mail from anyone at @bigfatassspammer.com or from any NNTP server @nntpserverspammer.org or whatever it really should prevent violation of basic communication rights and as such because it involves interstate commerce and other activities the FTC and the FCC could easily get involved. In short even the most prolific spam is a personal dispute not an institutional problem. It is your problem and your problem alone to deal with. I should not have to take a stand just because a group of people who don't check their email once every 6 monts complain about getting email. Email is not just for personal communication and more of an informational delivery system which actually sees more traffic I would wager from mailinglists and other forms of batch oriented traffic.
  • yup. but they have no official standing so that restricts em to a minority. what would be kewl would be a .gnu or .oss or .null or .bbs type domain officially ICANN accredited.
  • Well, we are working on that (but pursuing rquality, not accredition; ICANN is not a legitimate authority for issuing accredition). If you went to the OpenNIC site this evening, you'll notice that the latest news item is that I'm an official candidate for the ICANN Board ... ;-) -robin
  • They were taking BSD, Artistic, and MPL-clone licensed software projects as well as GPL and LGPL stuff. One of my freinds got a .cx domain early on for a BSD licensed project for which he had yet to actually release source. He initially tried for portman.cx and natalieportman.cx, to be funny (he was actually going to change the name of his ICQ clone to make the domain 'fit'. NPICQ isn't that bad, is it??)

    Oh, and it's Network Solutions you have to worry about. They've shown complete disregard for anything other than how much money they can rape out of the lesser registrars. On my personal list of worries, the FSF comes in somewhere after dying in a vat of preprocessed grits at Quaker..
  • Governments have overwhelmingly opened up their .xx for use by the public/corporations. But, not .us -- as far as I know, .us remains under government control, right? Sure, people in the U.S. can use .com, .org, etc. But so does everyone else. This seems 'unusual' for the U.S. government. What's up?
  • Really I would love to see some rather wealthy people sue some lazy sysadmins. That would be nice. As I see it if people want to anal about spam that's their business but I don't have to constantly hear people bitch about it. I never receive a piece of spam at all.
  • Are u serious or being facetious? Ghod I worked as a sysadmin for 2 years and the job can burn a regular person out in under 3 months.

    Yeah any joe schmoe can build a F1 formula racer after taking a class on changing the oil in his car and playing with legos when he was 3 right?

    Please.. like the previous poster mentioned u have made your ignorance obvious with that post.

    How about you try managing several hundread machines, running several thousand websites, add and remove hundreads of user accounts, configure routers, add pop and net connections for new customers. At the same time wardning off crackers, paying attention to security lists about the latest exploits and applying patches to said hundreads of servers.

    How about checking those machines everyday for any signs of failing hardware, replacing it and having to deal with vendors that flatly refuse to acknowledge that 4 out of the 8 cpus in the sparc your company just forked out $60K for aren't working.

    Then try doing this knowing that you are on call 24/7 and that you are guaranted to be woken up at 3 am to handle a service call by a user who screwed up their website and needs a backup restored NOW!

    Besides that you're right a sysadmin's job is a piece of cake.
  • I hope you made a mistake... .net isn't exactly a new TLD :)

    Sure it is! Microsoft just innovated it, remember?

    --

  • Who the Ffsck do these American wankers think they are telling the rest of the world that the US court is the only way to get justice and "fairness"? Who the hell is the US congress to tell the rest of us how to live our lives, and do our business?

    MAPS is based in the United States. If you don't like it, start your own damn RBL. Nobody's forcing you to use theirs (which is exactly the point of all of this).

    --

  • I think Rob throws out the newest 25% of accounts, so that 169xxx should be old enough any day now, as I've seen 220xxx accounts come into existence. Once they hit the mid-230's, that should open up.
  • by Ungrounded Lightning ( 62228 ) on Wednesday August 09, 2000 @05:33PM (#866324) Journal
    Interestingly, if Harris were to somehow win this one it would probably be worse for them than if they lost it.

    With Harris removed from the RBL database by injunction after all that publicity, a significant number of sysadmins at major ISPs are likely to put them in their individual blackhole lists or configuration files. This will disrupt their mail about as badly as the RBL would.

    But with Harris in the RBL they can easily get out again. All they have to do is convince MAPS they've cleaned up their act. With Harris in individual blackhole lists at a hundred or a thousand ISPs, getting out is NOT automatic, or easy.

    First, they'd have to get the word out to ALL those sysadmins and convince EACH of them to do some extra work. As a former unrepentant spammer who went so far as to sue to block MAPS, forcing those sysadmins to do extra work already, they'll have little sympathy among even those sysadmins who DO get the word. So some won't pull them out, and their mail will continue to be disrupted.

    Then they'll have to hunt down all the disruptions and talk to all those remaining ISPs. And some still might not pull them out. The next step is back to court for injunctions on those remaining ISPs - probably repeatedly as more are identified. And to prevail they'd have to prove that the ISPs have an obligation to forward their mail. Even if that succeeds their mail could be disrupted for years.

  • What's creepy is that the question even came up, that someone thought that the government had the right to censor the blacklist.

    It makes me wonder if someday some spammer could raise a stink and actually successfully get such a restraining order. Maybe it would be a good idea for the list to be distributed across multiple jurisdictions.


    ---
  • >They are in fact only there as trained monkeys
    >because AI bots havn't been perfected yet.

    Proof positive right there that you've never BEEN a sysadmin. Or for that matter, quite likely have never done time on the helldesk either. It's more work than you think.

    But back to the spam arguement...

    You seem to be confused as to the difference between a PUBLIC service, and a PRIVATE network.

    For starters, your analogy does not hold water:

    >That's like saying that as a landlord of a
    >building you have the right to read through my
    >mail and throw out anyhting that looks like junk
    >(or if you prefer bulk) mail right?

    The proper analogy is to say that as the owner (leasor actually) of a telephone line, I have EVERY right to prevent people from coming into *MY* home, placing long distance calls on *MY* line, or receiving long distance collect calls on *MY* line.

    >In fact if you so much as read another's private
    >email correspondence from start to finish you have
    >commited a violation of privacy of the user.

    Wrong. On *MY* PRIVATE network the traffic is MINE until it leaves my system. I have every right to look at, or /dev/null any packet that passes through. Your boss at work has every right to read your email or monitor or curtail the useage of your boxen.

    If you don't like that, get a contract that specifies otherwise, or encrypt all your mail (preferably both). And get a new job where they don't monitor employee computer useage while you're at it.

    >The point is that civil rights supercede in every
    >instince your right to do whatever the hell you
    >want.

    Wrong again.

    Your arguement applies only if it's the govergnment doing the spam blocking.

    On a PRIVATE network, which *I* own and adminster (wether I personally own all the hardware, own 51% of the stock in the company, or simply write the service policy that users agree to when they sign up) civil rights do not apply.

    If I own a message board, I can block any message that contains the word "fuck" (or "fred" or "lederhosen") if I care to (I don't). If it's an email service, I am entirely within my rights to block spammers. If it's a usenet gateway, it is my right to block the alt heiarchy if I want (I don't, but I impose an upper size limit on it).

    The point is that I have no obligation beyond what is in the *CONTRACT*. Is you don't like my terms, you don't have to do business with me.

    john
    Resistance is NOT futile!!!

    Haiku:
    I am not a drone.
    Remove the collective if

  • .cx is Christmas Islands.

    Kalrand

    -the voice of reason
  • by fluxrad ( 125130 ) on Wednesday August 09, 2000 @03:19PM (#866332) Homepage
    It always annoys me when something like this happens. I'm glad to see that the gub'ment has allowed the RBHL to do what it needs to do.

    this isn't denying anyone from sending spam...it's just saying "hey, you may wanna take note of these guys"

    just the same as the usenet death sentancing that's going on....It's not law, or anyone fscking anyone over. It's just a respected group keeping a database of known evil-doers. Am i the only one who can't believe the gub'ment actually made a correct decision on this one?


    FluX
    After 16 years, MTV has finally completed its deevolution into the shiny things network
  • The Free Software Foundation helps pay for certain things in the Free Software community, correct? Then why doesn't it take donations to buy a TLD and then just run a Domain Name Server based on their TLD. The Free Software community could just set it up themselves and avoid the middleman of having to go through other TLD's to begin with.

    uhh..

    Maybe because you can't buy a TLD?

    New gTLDs have to be approved by ICANN, and the FSF already proposed a .gnu TLD. ccTLDs have to correspond to actual countries, and are theoretically supposed to be used by those countries (although most smaller countries like Christmas Island and Tonga have decided to simply sell off second-level domains to whoever will pay them money).

    --

  • nic.cx [nic.cx] says it's for Christmas Island [whois.nic.cx].
  • I saw a YesMail opt-in form at the 50megs.com sign up. AFAIK, YesMail is an opt-in newsletter.
    <O
    ( \
    XGNOME vs. KDE: the game! [8m.com]
  • Don't you LOVE the IDIOTS that try to get First Post using their account logins? I think it's hilarious.

    It really shows the mentality/maturity behind some of our "peers".


    I find it commendable. If he's going to post a comment, he should be willing to take responsibility for it through moderation and know that his reputation will be affected.

    to tiny69: Get a life. I for one hope you get your account cancelled, and have your IP address blocked from accessing this site. Not necessarily because you are a "FIRST POSTER!" (that is a big part however), but that you were *stupid* enough to do it LOGGED IN!

    You're replying to a first post, flaming the poster not for his comment, but for not checking the "Post Anonymously" box. And you think he needs a life? A bit hypocritical, don't you think? I also have to point out that this doesn't make his +5 Insightful [slashdot.org] comment is any less interesting.

    First Posting is childish. But to use your account is just plain stupid. From here out, everyone knows *exactly* how to judge everything you say.

    Hope it was worth it.


    Slashdot does have a moderation system. It works. If the moderators agree that First Posting is childish, he'll get modded down, and those of us who browse at +1 won't have to see it.

    --

  • The Free Software Foundation helps pay for certain things in the Free Software community, correct?
    They fund a handful of devlopers and organizers, yes.
    Then why doesn't it take donations to buy a TLD...
    Mostly because TLDs are not for sale. (Unless, I suppose, you consider buying off a bunch of people at ICANN.)
  • by ThunderD ( 197016 ) on Wednesday August 09, 2000 @05:45PM (#866349)
    I gotta love this bit from Harris.

    ---
    A call for intervention
    "We would much prefer the fairness of an American court system and a jury than a group of self-appointed zealots for Internet e-mail," Black fumed. "We would prefer to have Congress set the rules.
    ---

    Who the Ffsck do these American wankers think they are telling the rest of the world that the US court is the only way to get justice and "fairness"? Who the hell is the US congress to tell the rest of us how to live our lives, and do our business?

    Regardless of the debates between MAPS and the other black holing mob, the point is that FREE CHOICE is what drives system administrators and companies to use these anti-spam methods.

    Harris can go jump - and any US court that tries to tell ME to remove MAPS filtering from one of my Australian based systems will be told where to insert their heads.

  • From the other perspective, perhaps individual ISP's and companies should have to maintain their own lists... When people or companies converge, it often serves their interests prior to the public's interests. Things like oglipolies and price fixing result from companies cooperating too much...

    The whole Harris case came up because, as far as I understand, 3 people out of 6.6 million complained. 3 people get's them barred from sending to the other 6.6 million...

    WHy not give this article [cnet.com] a read? And read this one [cnet.com], too, for some background.

    If you don't take the time to read it, you'll see that Harris' list was an OPT-IN list. Everyone who was on it wanted to be on it. They asked to be on it. Yet with a simple flip of the switch, MAPS, which has no oversight, prevented them from reaching their customers.

    Makes me think a government regulated internet might actually be better than the mismash we've got going on right now... At least then, people are actually accountable for things.
  • I was amazed at what the winning program generated when pointed to slashdot.org.

    Natile Portman
    eating hot grits, Penis Birds
    are what Slashdot is.


    Kalrand

    -the voice of reason
  • So long as no one is required to abide by the list that MAPS creates of mail abusers, would a restraining order preventing them from listing a spammer (by their definition) ever work? I rather hope not.

    Would it work against MAPS itself? Yes, MAPS is subject to court orders just like everyone else. But if, say, MAPS were to commend that xyz.com be blackholed, and others chose to follow that advice, would it work against them? Nope. Unless and until the court gains jurisdicition over others, the court order would not be binding on those not party to the action. Is that what you were getting at?

    BTW, the MAPS press release [mail-abuse.org] notes that they have retained Michael Grow of the Arent, Fox law firm in D.C. to represent them. Heavy hitter, knows his stuff, works for a firm which has "gotten" the Net for a whole lot longer than most.

  • by QuMa ( 19440 ) on Wednesday August 09, 2000 @03:35PM (#866363)
    I have a .cx account, but I'm going to get a domain somewhere else real soon now... Here is the email they sent me (one of them anyway), emphasis (with <B>) is mine:


    You have received this email because you have previously registered
    your details on www.nic.cx or www.niccx.com. Your contact ID is CX22291.

    We have received a lot of feedback about our last email and would like
    to say a big thank you for that. Although we weren't able to reply to
    every single one, we have taken them all into consideration when we
    decided about the future of NICCX.COM.

    We at NICCX.COM have finally decided not to become a registrar in the
    new shared registry system that is currently being developed by Dot CX.

    The main reasons for this are as follows:

    - Most of you have told us they wouldn't accept to pay any more money
    for their cx domain. A substantial increase of registry fees would
    be inevitable if we were to participate in the shared registry.

    - We have always tried to be 'the registrar with a difference'.
    The terms and conditions for registrars in the new registry system
    wouldn't leave us too many options on how we handle registrations.
    For instance we wouldn't be able to offer 'test registrations'
    (ie. you register and set up your domains first, and pay only
    after it's all working), or free/discounted domains for certain
    groups (open source developers, CX residents, etc) anymore.


    We will however continue to provide the same level of service until the
    end of your domain's registration term. At the end of that term you will
    have to transfer the domain to a new registrar if you want to keep it.
    You will be informed about how to do that when your domain expires.

    Dot CX have set up a new (draft) privacy policy. It can be found at

    http://www.dot.cx/policies.privacy.cfm

    Under the new policy, personal details like address, phone number and
    email are not accessible via the WHOIS anymore.

    Please send your comments and enquiries to policy@dot.cx

    Because of the new policy, we have agreed with Dot CX to keep accepting
    payments for EXISTENT registrations until the 15th of August (2000-08-15).

    This means you can still extend your domain's registration period for the
    old registry fee (10.- UK Pounds per year), but have to accept the new
    terms and conditions. After that time we will accept NO MORE payments.

    Again, thanks for all your feedback and we are looking forward to staying
    in touch with you for upto 5 more years.

    Thank you for your attention.

    Regards,

    Hostmaster@niccx.com
  • by JojoLinkyBob ( 110971 ) <joeycato@[ ]il.com ['gma' in gap]> on Wednesday August 09, 2000 @03:38PM (#866364) Homepage
    You can already get a free domain name from namezero.com. They forward to your web-host, and you just have to put up with a small advert frame at the bottom.
  • IIRC namezero.com owns your domain name. They just let you use it.

    Kalrand

    -the voice of reason
  • I'm glad that the RBL is able to list Harris for being clueless about their spam problems. I'm not glad that there's a restraining order for YesMail. BUT -- I'm glad that YesMail's IP addresses are already public, and many sites are blocking them now for their fsck'ed up action.

    ---
    Another non-functioning site was "uncertainty.microsoft.com." The purpose of that site was not known. -- MSNBC 10-26-1999 on MS crack
  • <Dr. Evil Voice>

    Right

    </Dr. Evil Voice>

    kwsNI
  • What would it take for an ISP to give their users a choice? 2 different incoming mail hosts? Or could it all be handled on the same host? I don't know the details of how a MAPS subscription works...

    ---

  • Nope, you're dead wrong.

    To begin with, MAPS does not block anyone's email (except, perhaps, to their own servers). Other networks/ISPs may use MAPS' list to block email coming into *their* network from sites on the list, but that's well within their rights.

    Further, MAPS doesn't go out and actively look for companies that don't meet their standards. The operate _only_ in response to well-documented complaints from users who either never opted in in the first place, or who did opt-in but who the company refused to allow to opt back out. And they always try to contact the alleged spammer, explain to them why what they are doing is wrong, and get them to change to more responsible list management practices. An RBL listing is a last resort, reserved for companies that absolutely refuse to clean up their acts.

    Among other things, the companies in question appear to have gotten into trouble with MAPS either because they used a sleazy, non-obvious pre-checked opt-in box, or because they failed to confirm that email addresses they were given actually corresponded to people who wanted to opt-in.

    After all, it is trivial to (accidentally or purposely) subscribe someone else's email address to an opt-in list on a company website -- it is up to the owner of that website to make sure the person who signed up actually has that email address.

    Confirmation is trivial -- just send an email to that address with a web link for the user to click on or an email address to reply to, and you've proved who they are. End of problem.

    This is actually of significant benefit to the savvy marketer. It allows them to eliminate bad addresses easily ("mickeymouse@nowhere.invalid"), and tends to produce a much higher response rate in subsequent marketing messages.

  • by DustyHodges ( 174738 ) on Wednesday August 09, 2000 @07:33PM (#866381)
    Haiku Offtopic
    In a slashback on Haiku
    Cheap crack suspected
  • February we reported that the .cx registrar was offering free domains to open-source projects

    Domain names have several rules that must be followed. [icann.org]
    And so I must wonder if this concern only projects under the GPL? What I fear most is a rise of partisanship in the handling of the assignment of domain names like theses ones, as well as some of the newly proposed extensions like .net, .jobs and the like.
    My biggest interest is the handling of projects under GPL-Compatible lisences such as the MPL [mozilla.org] and the QPL [trolltech.com].

    I therefore propose not to allow the handling of new domain names, .cx or otherwise, be controlled by a single entity which might be subjected to pressure from interest groups like GNU [gnu.org], with all due respect that I hold for that organization.


    --
    Kiro

  • See http://slashdot.org/com ments.pl?sid=00/07/29/1816254&cid=15 [slashdot.org]. The newest version of the SlashCode put a karma limit of 50. Anything over that is frozen. Start searching the threads for karma and frozen, you'll see a lot of this. Personally, I've had a ton of posts go up and down, it hasn't changed my karma since 8/1/00.

    kwsNI

"I'm not a god, I was misquoted." -- Lister, Red Dwarf

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