Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Bullshit Stats. (Score 1) 485

by hawk (#48442705) Attached to: As Amazon Grows In Seattle, Pay Equity For Women Declines

There are lots of reasons, ranging from education requited, ease of rentry/exit, flexibility, working conditions, schedule, and many more.

But when you actually control for choices made by worker, experience, education and specialization, and so forth, something like 99% of the difference is explained.

But that makes for boring press releases . . .

hawk, economics professor

Comment: Wrong real question (Score 1) 485

by hawk (#48442697) Attached to: As Amazon Grows In Seattle, Pay Equity For Women Declines

Speaking as an economic professor . . .

It's not hard to explain why Amazon or any other employer would pay women (or greens, or redheads, or . . ) less. Of course they want to pay less.

What we cannot explain is why on earth they would pay white males more than a purple woman with green hair . . .

doc hawk

Comment: Re:Not the holder's money (Score 1) 95

The copyright holder don't care. As long as the university is stopping people from downloading free content

Why in the world would they want to stop people? They're making money from it! They have incentive to make it as easy as possible. Their best strategy is likely to be to ignore most of it and issue the occasional small fine. That both keeps it going and fills their coffers.

Comment: Re:So close, so far (Score 2) 546

by hawk (#48427089) Attached to: "Barbie: I Can Be a Computer Engineer" Pulled From Amazon

I'm certainly not going to go read a Barbie book (I've had enough after four daughters!).

But it's easy to make a tilted description to feed a story like this.

I once saw a listing for the Wizard of Oz as something to the effect of "A white girl goes to a foreign land, kills the first person she meets, and sets off to kill again." . . .

hawk

Comment: Re:Can government solve government problems? (Score 1) 135

by bmajik (#48397321) Attached to: Can the US Actually Cultivate Local Competition in Broadband?

My ILEC is CenturyLink, a national company. The neighboring ILEC is actually a locally owned company that is much smaller and is providing much better service.

The point is, even if I wanted wired IP service from a competing ISP, that's not possible because the ILEC owns the copper to my property and the ILEC cannot provide L2 connectivity over its existing infrastructure, and has no plans to upgrade that infrastructure.

Meanwhile, a neighboring, locally owned ILEC is running FTTH to its rural customers...

I haven't spoken enough with the competing ILEC to know if they'd be able to finance their fiber buildout without capturing the revenue from voice and data service on top of their plant.

I don't understand your reference to my state. I agree that we shouldn't make laws for everyone based on the conditions in a particular place.

That's actually a great reason to limit FCC oversight, since it is a federal entity and makes rules that are national in scope...

Comment: Re:Can government solve government problems? (Score 1) 135

by bmajik (#48397241) Attached to: Can the US Actually Cultivate Local Competition in Broadband?

Why does Verizon have the right to saturate my property with 700mhz energy?

I didn't sell that to them.

If they want to shoot 700mhz energy across (and through!) my house, why don't they have to buy rights to that? If they are preventing me from being able to do anything in my own home with 700mhz because of their harmful emissions, why don't I have any recourse against them?

Nobody would let me park across the street from your house and shine lasers or even flashlights into your windows.

Why is Verizon given this same privilege, albeit in a section of non-visible spectrum?

The current RF energy governance framework we have in the US may not be appropriate. The spectrum licensees certainly benefit from legal protection from competition, and from legal usurpation of my property rights on a massive scale...

Comment: Re:Can government solve government problems? (Score 1) 135

by bmajik (#48397141) Attached to: Can the US Actually Cultivate Local Competition in Broadband?

I am near the edge of my ILEC's territory. If I wanted a different ILEC from a neighboring territory to be able to provide service at my address, I would need to petition for the two ILECs in question to agree to "hand me off" from the current ILEC to a different one.

This comes directly from the state public service commission in my state (North Dakota).

Comment: Can government solve government problems? (Score 4, Interesting) 135

by bmajik (#48396731) Attached to: Can the US Actually Cultivate Local Competition in Broadband?

Legally, only one ILEC is allowed to run copper pairs to my property. They have no interested in upgrading their plant.

They have a protected monopoly.

In many jurisdictions, only one cable company can put coax in the ground.

They have a protected monopoly.

IP protections, like copyright, are a government protected monopoly.

Frequency allocations, overseen by the FCC, are a government protected monopoly.

Access Easements on private property for incumbent wire owners (e.g. the cable company can put a truck or a box on your property if they like) are a government grant of special privilege.

Given all of the government collusion with the current infrastructure, asking if government can address its own problems seems a bit silly. Of course it could. It could stop enabling all of the stuff it currently enables, for one.

If you try to factor the residential broadband problem into an OSI-type layer model, perhaps what makes sense is to limit vertical integration.

E.g. if there is physical plant, IP transit, content delivery, and content production, it would be problematic to allow, for instance, SONY, to own all 4 of those layers in some specific area.

Ideally there would be robust competition at each layer.

Another action the government could take would be to stop approving merger/consolidation deals that have the net effect of consolidating layers and/or markets in such a way that overall marketplace competition suffers.

In some communities, public utility ownership of layer 1 (physical plant) would make a lot of sense and would be voter supported. In others, it wouldn't, and wouldn't. Both models are worth trying.

As you go up the stack, there are lots of opportunities for different business models. Community owned IP transit? Why not? This is, in some regards, the case at current internet peering points. The members co-own the exchanges. It is in some respects like the agricultural co-ops that are so common in rural America - the land of rugged individualists.

People are, after all, not opposed to working in groups when they like the group and when the cooperation makes sense (as opposed to being coercive in nature)

Moneyliness is next to Godliness. -- Andries van Dam

Working...