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Comment: Re:How much based on who controls the White House? (Score 3, Insightful) 221

by Grishnakh (#48947315) Attached to: The NSA Is Viewed Favorably By Most Young People

This is exactly it, in my opinion. Democrat voters are idiots who will back anything their Dear Leader Obama does, even when it was something they were bitching about during Bush's reign.

And Republican voters are just as stupid. They're now bitching about things that they were perfectly OK with when Bush was doing them, but now that Obama is doing them, they're up in arms.

Comment: Re:Not my findings (Score 1) 221

by Grishnakh (#48947297) Attached to: The NSA Is Viewed Favorably By Most Young People

This is because the crowd you hang out with is not representative of mainstream America. These polls are important because they show what the majority of Americans think about things, and those people are who vote for our leaders. Your little peer group does not have sole power to choose our governmental leaders.

What this shows can be argued different ways. Are young people these days generally more conservative than older people? (seems unlikely) Or is it because they're aligned with the Democratic Party, and since that party is currently in power in the Executive Branch, and their Dear Leader is all in favor of NSA spying, they too are in favor of it? Personally I think it's the latter. Americans are really stupid politically, and simply choose a "team" and then mindlessly back anything that team does. If Obama came out in favor of tax breaks for the rich and against abortion, Democrat voters would adopt those positions immediately, while if the Republican Party suddenly came out in favor of gay marriage and abortion rights and extremely progressive taxation (i.e. rich people would be taxed much more heavily), Republican voters would immediately adopt those positions too.

Comment: Re:No shit (Score 1) 110

by Grishnakh (#48946847) Attached to: Wi-Fi Issues Continue For OS X Users Despite Updates

I wonder how much of this is a lack of decent alternatives which are well-marketed, versus simple cultlike behavior.

Think about it: if you want a PC-like computer, what are your choices? There's Apple which is well-marketed and attractive and shiny (but has downsides which aren't as obvious unless you're really familiar with the industry), there's Microsoft-driven PCs where you have to use shitty Windows and deal with all its annoyances, and there's Linux where there's pretty much no one actually pre-installing it and marketing it to consumers (plus there's a ton of different graphical environments, and the two most publicized ones are radical departures from Windows/Mac and have a lot of usability issues, and the one which is a great fit for Windows converts is simply ignored by the Linux community for some reason).

Maybe if there were another company making PCs with an attractive, stable OS which was very usable and could market it decently, we'd be seeing more people abandoning Apple.

This analysis of course is for PCs, not mobile devices. But over there the situation isn't much better; there's Android which has huge marketshare but still you have to deal with a complete lack of support after you buy the device, and then there's Windows Phone which is tainted by everyone's memory of Windows and MS problems. But still, Apple has lost a lot of marketshare in the phone market (though some of that is simply due to the market expanding, and Apple not aiming at the lower end).

Comment: Re:A good thing. (Score 1) 275

by Grishnakh (#48942501) Attached to: Microsoft To Invest In Rogue Android Startup Cyanogen

That's not even the biggest problem with Google and Android; the biggest problem is the complete lack of support Android devices get after they're a few months old, which makes them security nightmares. Cyanogen promises to fix that, but it's only going to work if they have better device coverage than they have now.

Comment: Re:A good thing. (Score 2) 275

by Grishnakh (#48942477) Attached to: Microsoft To Invest In Rogue Android Startup Cyanogen

That makes no sense at all. Cyanogen is a bit player; how many people do you know who are running it? (If you do know any, exclude all the tech-heads and answer again.) MS doesn't care about destroying something that's barely larger than a hobby project.

MS *does* care about hurting Google and improving the marketshare for Windows Phone, or somehow improving their own presence in the mobile arena. So any actions here are going to be towards that end.

Perhaps they see any move to help Cyanogen as something which will help destabilize Android in general. Or, more likely, they see it as something that can use to get a big foothold into the Android space, and then use it to take it over from Google. Embrace, extend, extinguish.

Comment: Re:No shit (Score 1) 110

by Grishnakh (#48941847) Attached to: Wi-Fi Issues Continue For OS X Users Despite Updates

There's also code besides the driver code; the Broadcom chips themselves have CPU cores (not sure what kind exactly) running their own firmware, which of course is loaded by the driver. This code is completely closed-source and secret. (The driver code is partially open; you can see their open-source Linux code in the kernel tree; it's "brcmfmac" and "brcmsmac")

I wonder if Apple's recent updates updated the firmware blobs for the Broadcom chips? This could also explain the problems.

Comment: Re:No shit (Score 3, Informative) 110

by Grishnakh (#48941815) Attached to: Wi-Fi Issues Continue For OS X Users Despite Updates

I've worked with the Broadcom driver source code; it's crap. It doesn't surprise me they're having problems. What's funny is (now that I think about it and remember this from a prior job) Apple is easily Broadcom's biggest wifi customer; you'd think they could do a better job with their software for them, but apparently not.

Comment: Re:Electrical engineers write sucky code (Score 1) 72

by svirre (#48941677) Attached to: Reverse Engineering the Nike+ FuelBand's Communications Protocol

Actually it looks like a manufacturing managers decision. Somone writes code that depend on that manufacturing needs to inject and track unique keys for each device. Manufacturing sees this and realizes they actually need to earn their keep and set up infrastructure to support product requirements, instantly balks, and force through a security hole they neither understand or care about.

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