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Comment Re:Fans' Vote Was No Award (Score 4, Interesting) 1044

Nobody had to pay $40 to vote in the Slashdot poll. They had to pay at least $40 to vote in the Hugos. This is also, apparently, a huge increase over the last number of people who voted in the Hugos (65% more than last time?) suggesting a significant groundwell.

Comment Re:Most people who say (Score 3, Informative) 157

I don't keep up with Harlan's schedule these days, but I worked with him briefly back when he was at Netflix. At the time, he didn't strike me as much of a braggart or prone to exaggeration. And his work ethic was ... not high on work/life balance.

I wouldn't bet against him working that hard on NTP -- I've never before met anyone who loved a protocol as much as Harlan loves NTP :)

Comment Re:Unlimited for one year (Score 1) 418

Netflix does not, has not, and would nto frown on asking for a full year off for maternity or paternity. To the best of my knowledge, there are at least three people who have in the last week indicated they're planning to take a full year off. I think it's pretty exciting and if any of them were reporting to me (I'm a manager at Netflix), I'd do nothing to get in their way.

Christ, people. It's just work. Family is forever.

Comment Re:Unlimited for one year (Score 2) 418

It's a year per 'event' (so you don't get two years if you have twins, but if you have another kid you can have another year). There's obviously a potential for abuse of the system, given that it takes less than a year to hatch a kid, but the odds of that happening are probably lower than the odds of people abusing the existing unlimited vacation policy, or the likely harm from people abusing the lax expense policy, etc.

Comment Re:Pure marketing jargon (Score 1) 33

I disagree.

Firstly, there's a difference between "public cloud" and "private cloud," where 'public' implies "someone else's computer," but given this, and given that you can do private clouds, clearly the ownership of the hardware is not the defining characteristic for "cloud."

Rather, I'd argue the definition for "cloud" has to include -- perhaps more importantly than any other part of the definition -- the ability to request a resource from the system via an API and get it automatically (barring resource constraint issues or artificial limits) without human involvement. THAT is what makes it "cloud," irrespective of whether you're making that API call against the systems your own IT folks set up to get a resource within your datacenter or you're making that call against AWS.

Comment Re:It was an app on a WORK-Issued Phone! (Score 1) 776

So funny story about this ...

When I started working at my current company (tech company, where I do tech things), my pre-employment paperwork required me to agree to a drug test (though none was actually administered). I was surprised by this -- never had to agree to this before -- but at my wife's counsel (in both senses of the word -- she's an attorney -- agreed because I didn't want to be "that guy").

About a week after I started, I was idly talking to our security guy and mentioned this, and he flipped out, and sent an email to HR complaining about the inappropriateness of requiring all employees to agree to drug tests. I got a really contrite email from HR letting me know that the drug test provision was there for the part of the company that was driving for the company as their job, because insurance and the law, apparently, required us to get them to agree to drug tests, but that people who weren't driving for the company would never, ever, ever be required to do a drug test; the pre-boarding paperwork erroneously specified this for everyone rather than just new drivers, apologies, etc, and they would fix it immediately.

It was a nice way to start working here.

panic: kernel trap (ignored)

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