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Comment: Re:My B.S. Detector is Going Off (Score 1) 64

by Bruce Perens (#49515639) Attached to: Old Marconi Patent Inspires Tiny New Gigahertz Antenna

If the end of the coil that is hanging is grounded (earthed), it becomes an autotransformer. As it's shown, it's a variable inductor and the disconnected end is irrelevant and has no meaningful physical effect at the frequency a spark transmitter could have reached.

This comment seems to get closer to what they actually mean in their scientific paper. But the article about it is garble and the paper might suffer from second-language issues, and a lack of familiarity with the terms used in RF engineering.

Comment: Can't say I love it *yet*. (Score 1) 102

by jcr (#49515131) Attached to: Swift Tops List of Most-Loved Languages and Tech

Coming from many years of Obj-C development, I can acknowledge several ways in which Swift is superior, but the learning curve is somewhat steeper than the transition from C to Objective-C was.

Aside from the language itself, Swift playgrounds are wonderful. We're getting closer all the time to a Smalltalk way of writing code.

-jcr

Comment: Re:So is it REALLY good? (Score 3, Informative) 102

by bluefoxlucid (#49513747) Attached to: Swift Tops List of Most-Loved Languages and Tech

Having used both Objective-C and C++, I can point out Objective-C as being a vast improvement over C without bringing the major drawbacks of C++. For one thing, Objective-C specifies symbol resolution against what is actually available, rather than what is theorized: in C++, if you recompile a library with a new class member--even a new private member--the data structure of the C++ class is now incorrect, and all applications using that library must be recompiled; in Objective-C, you can extend a new interface onto a class.

Largely, Objective-C is C with classes. Along with that, it's C, however you want to take that, with a better OOP implementation than C++. It's not Python or C#.

Comment: Re:Hmm, I guess I invented this as well... (Score 1) 64

by Bruce Perens (#49513567) Attached to: Old Marconi Patent Inspires Tiny New Gigahertz Antenna

Damn, I wish I would have patented that and all its quantum magic...

I noticed that my vertical transmitting antenna often works better if I connect a horizontal wire about the same length as the antenna to ground at its base! The wire isn't connected to the transmitting side of the circuit at all! And how well it works varies depending on the length! Obviously there is some deus ex machina at work here...

Comment: Re:My B.S. Detector is Going Off (Score 1) 64

by Bruce Perens (#49513517) Attached to: Old Marconi Patent Inspires Tiny New Gigahertz Antenna

Clearly you missed the bit where they invoked quantum mechanics, surely that explains away all the inaccuracies, like the fact you can already buy chip scale dielectric antennas

The thing that I really hate about Innovation Stories is that the reporter invariably doesn't understand what's going on, and invariably is easily convinced that The Obviiously Very Technical People have some very valuable invention.

Comment: Re:A great way to transport it... (Score 1) 569

They're usually coastal, columnar, and don't create all that much shade. You could conceivably use off-shore reflectors and a salt tower, as well as a vacuum-depressurized boiler (use the away pump or a siphon mechanism as a vacuum system to depressurize the main boiler). The tower doesn't have to be high; and it doubles its output when using a vacuum-depressurized boiler, which isn't common.

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