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Comment: Re:"Affluent and accomplished" is not the criterio (Score 1) 48

by Tom (#47943987) Attached to: Netropolitan Is a Facebook For the Affluent, and It's Only $9000 To Join

That $9000 bouncer will be just as happy to let in every reality TV star, pop artist, flash-in-the-pan record producer, a

Those TV and music starlets will stay on FB because they want and need to stay in touch with their fans.

The wealthy have always segregated themselves. That $10k membership fee in the golf club is not because keeping the grass short is so expensive, either. It is to make sure everyone you meet there is in your class.

Frankly speaking, I'm mostly surprised that this doesn't already exist.

Comment: Yup. (Score 1) 169

by aussersterne (#47943091) Attached to: Slashdot Asks: What's In Your Home Datacenter?

Same conclusion. It's too easy to feel that precarity from the early computing age (not enough storage! not enough cycles! data versions of things are special!) if you were there. I think there's some of that going on here on Slashdot a lot of the time.

People in love with old Unix boxen or supercomputer hardware. People that maintain their own libraries of video, but all that's stored there is mass-market entertainment. And so on. It's like newspaper hoarding.

Storage and computation are now exceedingly cheap. 8-bay eSATA RAID cases run a couple hundred bucks, new. 4TB SATA drives run less than that. With 6 raid ports on a mainboard and a couple of dual- or quad-eSATA port PCI-x cards, you can approach petabytes quickly—and just for four digits. The same goes for processing power—a dual-processor Xeon setup (in which each processor can have core counts in the double digits) again just runs $couple thou.

And data is now cheap and easy. Whatever you want—you can have it as data *already*. Movies? Music? Books? Big social data sets? They're coming out our ears. The investment of time and equipment required, all in all, to put yourself in a position to rip and store a library of "every movie you've ever rented," and then actually do so, is much larger than the cost of simply licensing them via streaming. The same goes for music, ebooks, and so on.

There's just no need. Even my desktop is now starting to feel obsolete—for the work computing I do, there's a good chance I'll just go to Amazon cloud services in the next year or two. At that point, an iPad, a wireless keyboard, and a couple apps will probably be all the computing power I need under my own roof. If I have a desktop, it'll just be to connect multiple monitors for screen real estate.

Comment: No datacenter. Just a desktop computer (Score 1) 169

by aussersterne (#47942863) Attached to: Slashdot Asks: What's In Your Home Datacenter?

with 20 cores, 128GB RAM, 48TB online storage, and gigabit fiber coming in.

Yes, I use all of it, for work. But it's definitely not a "data center." These days, I don't know why anyone would want one—even moderately sized enterprises are increasingly happy to pay someone else to own the data center. Seems nuts to me to try to bring it into your basement.

If you just need the computation and/or the storage, desktops these days run circles around the datacenter hardware from just a few years ago. If you need more than that, it's more cost effective and reliable to buy into someone-or-other's cloud.

Comment: Why do this? (Score 1) 169

by aussersterne (#47942793) Attached to: Slashdot Asks: What's In Your Home Datacenter?

I sort of don't get it. White box PCs with many cores, dozens of gigabytes of RAM, and multiple gigabit ethernet ports cost next to nothing these days with a few parts from Amazon.com. If the goal is just to play with powerful hardware, you could assemble one or a few white box PCs with *many* cores at 4+ GHz, *tons* of RAM, gigabit I/O, and dozens or hundreds of terabytes of online RAID storage for just a few thousand, and plug them straight into the wall and get better computation and frankly perhaps even I/O performance to boot, depending on the age of the rackware in question.

If you're really doing some crazy hobby experimenting or using massive data storage, you can build it out in nicer, newer ways that use far less (and more readily available) power, are far quieter, generate far less heat, don't take up nearly the space, and don't have the ugliness or premium cost spare parts of the kinds of gear being discussed here. If you need the features, you can easily get VMware and run multiple virtual machines. 100Mbps fiber and Gigabit fiber are becoming more common and are easy to saturate with today's commodity hardware. There are an embarrassment of enterprise-ready operating systems in the FOSS space.

If you really need high reliability/high availability and performance guarantees, I don't get why you wouldn't just provision some service for yourself at Amazon or somewhere else and do what you need to do. Most SaaS and PaaS companies are moving away from trying to maintain their own datacenters because it's not cost effective and it's a PITA—they'd rather leave it to specialists and *really big* data centers.

Why go the opposite direction, even if for some reason you really do have the need for those particular properties?

Comment: Re:So everything is protected by a 4 digit passcod (Score 1) 437

by tibit (#47940889) Attached to: Apple Will No Longer Unlock Most iPhones, iPads For Police

This assumes that there are no sidechannel attacks against this storage, and that it's protected against power fluctuations. IOW: A very professional professional with a $1E6+ budget would probably be able to do something more with it than just stare at it with dismay :)

Comment: Re: So everything is protected by a 4 digit passco (Score 1) 437

by tibit (#47940817) Attached to: Apple Will No Longer Unlock Most iPhones, iPads For Police

That's only true given an assumption of there being no JTAG chain on an iPhone - I seriously doubt that. This gives you debug access to all the chips, and all you need to do is to pull the case apart and cradle the phone in a very modest bed of nails. This is sufficient to dump the flash, but not encryption keys. Unless there's a backdoor in the chip that carries the key - one can't be sure without reverse-engineering the relevant chip.

For all I know, Apple could have sneaked in JTAG access even through the lightning interface, so an encrypted dump of the flash could be done using a specialized JTAG-over-lightning bridge, without opening the phone.

Comment: Re:Does HFCS count? (Score 1) 258

by tibit (#47940719) Attached to: Study Finds Link Between Artificial Sweeteners and Glucose Intolerance

I think that such adaptations go even on a much shorter timescale. I don't eat between breakfast and dinner, and it used to be that I had a sugar low around 1-2pm. Right now it's the opposite: if I eat anything during the work hours, I get sleepy because there's an insulin low that starts after noon or so. And I did actually sample the insulin levels at hourly intervals for a month to make sure I'm not imagining things. These days, going out for an occasional lunch with coworkers is a surefire way to waste the rest of the day, falling asleep at the keyboard.

The best day for me is to get a bit of lactose from coffee with milk in the morning, not have anything else to eat, drink water, and then have a nice dinner. If I'm planning to do any work at night, the dinner must be under 1200 kcal.

Comment: Re:Does HFCS count? (Score 1) 258

by tibit (#47940675) Attached to: Study Finds Link Between Artificial Sweeteners and Glucose Intolerance

And that's why, in 2000 years or so, the evolutionary processes will likely fix it. Of course we'll be all in a big doodoo if, for whatever reason, we'd be faced with going back to a hunter-gatherer lifestyle - not only due to population crash, but also due to a then-maladaptation to circumstances that wouldn't exist anymore.

Comment: Re:Simple set of pipelined utilties! (Score 1) 350

by drinkypoo (#47938907) Attached to: Torvalds: No Opinion On Systemd

They think it's about limiting yourself to pipelines, but it's not. It's about writing simple robust programs that interact through a common, relatively high level interface, such as a pipeline. But that interface doesn't have to be a pipeline. It could be HTTP Requests and Responses.

It's an ASCII pipeline any time that it's feasibly and meaningfully human-comprehensible; that is part of the Unix way. Any other time the format varies broadly, and has been all sorts of things including BDB — which has all the same problems as binary log formats ala systemd. Since the user-perceivable output of javascript in a browser is XML, you reasonably could use STDIO in a very normally Unix-y way.

Comment: Re:Yes, pipelined utilities, like the logs (Score 1) 350

by drinkypoo (#47938825) Attached to: Torvalds: No Opinion On Systemd

Sometimes new stuff is actually much better than then old stuff. I was skeptical about binary logs until I actually tried it. The advantages of a indexed journal is overwhelmingly positive. "journalctl" is an extremely powerful logfilter exactly because of the indexed and structured logs.

None of which requires that logging be moved into PID 1. Instead, all you need is the ability to support a new log format in some syslogd. Unless you were some kind of moron, you'd design the new program to be able to log to both text and binary formats at the same time so that you could enjoy the benefits of both formats. Systemd may or may not do this, I don't care; there's no reason whatsoever why logging should not be a separate daemon.

Comment: Re:Simple set of pipelined utilties! (Score 1) 350

by drinkypoo (#47938793) Attached to: Torvalds: No Opinion On Systemd

If PID2 is responsible for critical features like eg. cgroups which affects all running processes, including PID1, then it won't make a difference.

cgroups is a kernel feature. It doesn't stop working because whatever process you're using for cgroup management dies. The process comes back, reads the state from /sys/fs/cgroup, and resumes doing whatever kind of management you wanted. If PID2 only manages cgroups, and cgroups' state is maintained in the kernel (which is is) then it doesn't particularly matter if the daemon craters, so long as you can restart it. But absent many requests for cgroup management, it may not actually even need to be long-running.

The only reason that we even need a daemon for cgroup management is that we're making inadequate use of capabilities. When a user (or script) runs a tool which creates cgroups via a mount, they should not need to use any tool for privilege elevation because they should have the right to manipulate one or more cgroups in one or more approved ways — which can consist of a couple of lines in a file which is sourced by init scripts. In systems with init scripts of any complexity, all of which source external files, no changes need appear in them whatsoever.

Comment: Re:Simple set of pipelined utilties! (Score 1) 350

by drinkypoo (#47938645) Attached to: Torvalds: No Opinion On Systemd

Even with a[n old, slow] HDD it only takes about a minute to boot my Ubuntu PC, and that's with a stupid-long POST to deal with the second ATA controller's stupid-long POST added to the base machine's stupid-long POST.

With that said, I am not against improvements to boot speed. I simply question the need for a replacement for PID 1.

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