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Comment Re:Dangerous, stupid lies. (Score 1) 614

Huh? Here is the 2nd paragraph of the linked site. It certainly does refute the post above. I think your reading comprehension needs some work:

"Radiocarbon analysis has dated the parchment on which the text is written to the period between AD 568 and 645 with 95.4% accuracy. The test was carried out in a laboratory at the University of Oxford. The result places the leaves close to the time of the Prophet Muhammad, who is generally thought to have lived between AD 570 and 632."

Note that "AD 568 to 645" is different than the Slashdot article lead which says "545 AD and 568".

Comment Re:Study is right, but needs more.. (Score 1) 165

A nuclear accident could easily release a lot more radiation than a coal plant. You are confused by the often-quoted fact that when operating normally, a coal plant can release more radiation. An accident though means the plant is not operating normally.

This may mean that the risk from the radiation from either type of plant when operating normally is pretty low. It's fun to point out that more radiation comes from a coal plant, but I'm pretty certain the danger from breathing the other crap that comes out of the coal plant way outweighs the radiation danger.

Comment Re:What a bunch of stupid Republicans (Score 1) 587

I believe the "stupid Republicans" posts are a troll, possibly from somebody who is actually right-wing. They are designed to look like they are posted by as stupid a person as possible. Have seen a couple equally ludicrous ones for the opposite direction, though they tend to use "Liberals" rather than "Democrats". Sometimes they use the exact same wording as the republican attack. Not as common, however, for whatever that means.

Comment Re:Why would you want this? (Score 1) 66

The intention is to have the database update when the close() is done, not on every write().

It is pretty obvious that the desired functionality could be done by fuse, where a get() is done on open and a put() is done on close if write was ever called.

I think the modern day applications that only write a part of a file are nearly non-existent (and in fact partial update where another program can see your unfinished writing, is usually a bug, not a feature). So there is no need for any api other than put().

There is a nice subset that only reads part of a file (and that part almost always includes the start of the file) however. So I can see this as being an argument for being able to access blocks of data from the remote.

Comment Can this be installed on a dual-boot machine (Score 1) 317

Probably going to be told I am a noob, but:

I have a dual-boot machine. It is an Acer machine and has a legitimate Windows 7 license and I installed Linux, keeping Windows 7 in a resized partition, and occasionally boot into it (it has a bug where it will not boot without a usb keyboard plugged in so I don't do it as often as I thought I would as I have to dig out that keyboard and plug it in). Linux is the default boot. I have no "recovery disk" and I may have lost any paperwork that came with the machine but it is a real legal copy.

So the question is: can I replace 7 with 10? Without damaging the Linux install? If it screws up grub how do I get it back?

As long as we're going to reinvent the wheel again, we might as well try making it round this time. - Mike Dennison

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