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Comment: Re:How Much (Score 1) 456

by srwalter (#41433909) Attached to: Riot Breaks Out At Foxconn

You can automate quite a lot, and you can even get the per unit cost competitive with a low wage worker. The problem is design changes, whether small tweaks to a current product or bring-up the next generation of a device. It's quite cheap to have a one hour meeting with the line workers to say, "look, you're going to put the screw 5mm to the left now." It's quite expensive to make even trivial changes to a largely-automated manufacturing process.

Oracle

Native ZFS Is Coming To Linux Next Month 273

Posted by timothy
from the is-it-as-magical-as-advertised? dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Phoronix is reporting that an Indian technology company has been porting the ZFS filesystem to Linux and will be releasing it next month as a native kernel module without a dependence on FUSE. 'In terms of how native ZFS for Linux is being handled by this Indian company, they are releasing their ported ZFS code under the Common Development & Distribution License and will not be attempting to go for mainline integration. Instead, this company will just be releasing their CDDL source-code as a build-able kernel module for users and ensuring it does not use any GPL-only symbols where there would be license conflicts. KQ Infotech also seems confident that Oracle will not attempt to take any legal action against them for this work.'"
Open Source

Linux Kernel 2.6.32 Released 195

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the download-compile-reboot-repeat dept.
diegocg writes "Linus Torvalds has officially released the version 2.6.32 of the Linux kernel. New features include virtualization memory de-duplication, a rewrite of the writeback code faster and more scalable, many important Btrfs improvements and speedups, ATI R600/R700 3D and KMS support and other graphic improvements, a CFQ low latency mode, tracing improvements including a 'perf timechart' tool that tries to be a better bootchart, soft limits in the memory controller, support for the S+Core architecture, support for Intel Moorestown and its new firmware interface, run-time power management support, and many other improvements and new drivers. See the full changelog for more details."

Comment: Re:Useless (Score 1) 815

by srwalter (#29797249) Attached to: PulseAudio Creator Responds To Critics

In today's world, OSS4 is open source, it is actively being developed, and it WORKS!

If OSS4 is such a great magic bullet, why hasn't it it included (much less default!) in a single distribution? Why isn't it part of the stock kernel package? Until both of those things are the case, OSS4 will continue to be an also-ran, just like devfs2 and GGI.

Comment: Re:who's to blame. (Score 1) 815

by srwalter (#29796951) Attached to: PulseAudio Creator Responds To Critics

I've been using Linux for over 10 years now and I've been telling people over and over again how even your grandma could use it, but sadly, I have to conclude that in some ways it still sucks balls for people who don't like fiddling around with obscure settings, configuration files, 4 layers of sound settings etc.

Yeah, I guess grandma will just have to use SPDIF output instead of HDMI. I'm sure she'll be heart-broken.

Technology

Image Recognition Neural Networks, Open Sourced 98

Posted by timothy
from the don't-tell-hal-about-this dept.
sevarac writes "The latest release of Java Neural Network Framework Neuroph v2.3 comes with ready-to-use image recognition support. It provides GUI tool for training multi layer perceptrons for image recognition, and an easy-to-use API to deploy these neural networks in end-user applications. This image recognition approach has been successfully used by DotA AutoScript tool, and now it is released as open source. With this Java library basic image recognition can be performed in just few lines of code. The developers have published a howto article and an online demo which can be used to train image recognition neural networks online."
Linux

Linux Games For Non-Gamers? 460

Posted by timothy
from the many-addictive-options-but-any-great-ones? dept.
Nethead writes "Due to some down-time, I'm looking for some Linux games to pass the time. I've been playing BattleMaster, a PHP web game but it's only two turns a day, and I'd like something a bit faster. I've not really played PC games since the Doom era so I'm really out of touch here. I don't have a real gamer box, just a simple video card. What do Slashdotters think I should try? A simple FPS or some type of networked game would do. What's out there for Linux?"
Science

An Electron Microscope For Your Home? 125

Posted by Soulskill
from the take-two-they're-small dept.
CuteSteveJobs writes "Could microscopy be in for a new golden age? Wired previewed the desktop-sized Hitachi TM-1000 Electron Microscope a while back. Light microscopes can magnify up to 400X (1,000X at lower quality) — just enough to see bacteria as shapes — but this one offers 20X to 10,000X, giving some amazing pictures. Unlike traditional electron microscopes, this one plugs into a domestic power socket and specimens don't need any special preparation; it's point-and-shoot, much like your typical digital camera. So easy a grade-schooler could use it, and earlier this year that's what happened: The kids at Iwanuma Elementary School in Miyagi, Japan got their own electron microscope. At $60,000, you'll have to give up on the BMW, but the hope is with economy of scale (so far 1,000 have sold) and miniaturization, the price will continue to drop. The only bad news? It runs XP."

Stellar rays prove fibbing never pays. Embezzlement is another matter.

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