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Comment: Re:Oh, too much to mention here...but (Score 1) 610

by Nethead (#47791579) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Old Technology Can't You Give Up?

User port on the SX-64, eh? Be careful not to short the 9VAC pins and blow the fuse INSIDE the transformer that has a lower rating than the one on the case. If you do, you can unwrap the tape around the xformer and solder a wire across the diode sized fuse in there.

I had an EPROM burner for the 64 and edited the font 2716 so that I could actually tell the difference between 6,8,and 0. That JVC screen was nice but the default Commodore font sucked.

My other mod was to replace the keyboard cable with a six foot flat ribbon cable. My eyes were so much better back in the 80s.

Comment: Reading comprehension. Do you have it? (Score 1) 215

by pavon (#47780815) Attached to: Canada Tops List of Most Science-Literate Countries

A recent survey of scientific education and attitudes showed the Canadian population to have the highest level of scientific literacy in the world, as well as the fewest reservations about the direction of scientific progress

They measured multiple things! The statement "We depend too much on science and not enough on faith" was measuring attitudes about science, and neither the article nor the report present it as an example of scientific literacy. Here is what the article stated as proof of scientific literacy from the article:

Among the most striking results from the survey is that Canada ranks first in science literacy, with 42 per cent of Canadians able to read and understand newspaper stories detailing scientific findings.

The executive summary of the report goes on to list some tests as an additional assessment:

Average score on OECD PISA 2012 science test: 525 (10th out of 65 countries)
Average score on OECD PISA 2012 math test: 518 (13th out of 65 countries)

Comment: Re:TFA bad at math? (Score 1) 146

by pavon (#47778399) Attached to: The American Workday, By Profession

Commenting to undo accidental moderation. But since I have to say something anyways...
It makes since that they would draw 9-5 on the graph, for easy comparison and that they would label it the standard workday, since that is what is traditionally been considered as such. But I have no clue how they could look at that graph and come to the conclusion that most people still work from 9-5, as the article text claims.

Comment: Re:Not surprising (Score 1) 506

by pavon (#47759255) Attached to: California DMV Told Google Cars Still Need Steering Wheels

Sure, I assume that all cars will have something like that. Heck, since the car will be doing navigation it will likely have found a gas/charging station and pulled over long before it even got to that. But regardless they will never be perfect. What if it sprung a leak and couldn't pull over in time because it judged that there was no suitable shoulder (mountain road, narrow bridge), and this info wasn't in it's database to enable it to plan ahead?

We have been mass producing cars for over 100 years, and by all reasonable measures they have never been as reliable as they are today. Yet they still break down on occasion. Self driving cars will have all the same mechanical and electrical problems that we have today, with software problem on top of that. You can mitigate some of these hardware problems with additional sensors, and fault-tolerant design of the driving computer, but only to the point where the sensors and software are significantly more reliable than the hardware they are monitoring, and only for the situations that are programed for.

There always will be situations where things break down in unexpected ways that the car isn't capable of handling on it's own. And based on the historical rate of reliability improvement, those situations won't be uncommon for quite some time.

Comment: Re:Not surprising (Score 4, Insightful) 506

by pavon (#47758513) Attached to: California DMV Told Google Cars Still Need Steering Wheels

They may never be removed. Everyone is focused on the split-second decision scenario when talking about this issue, and on that I agree that humans will cause more problems than they solve. But there are many more situations where manual override is needed and beneficial. What happens when the car runs out of gas/charge and you need to push it to the side of the road out of traffic. Or the computer is malfunctioning somehow (software bug, squirrel chewed halfway through a wire, dead battery/alternator). Or when I need to move the car somewhere off-road that the AI refuses to recognize as a valid driving path. There are plenty of not so time critical scenarios where some sort of manual override is needed and those aren't going to go away even when we trust the software to do all the driving. Once we admit that they don't have to be intuitive for split-second reactions, then they don't have to retain the traditional layout, nor be designed for comfortable everyday use, but some sort of steering, brake control, and neutral gear select will always be needed.

Comment: Re:Stop being such a drama queen. (Score 2) 158

by pavon (#47757841) Attached to: A Horrifying Interactive Map of Global Internet Censorship

such as people who clearly don't understand basic science drawing conclusions from unfiltered scientific data.

Those people come to their predetermined conclusions with or without the the raw data, but removing restrictions on distribution of data does help real researchers.

Or statistics? How many people are easily manipulated by presentations of statistics that they don't even understand?

Again those presenters would be manipulating opinion with or without openly available data.The fact that the statistics are openly available is the only chance people have to prove them wrong.

So neither of the examples of negative aspects are actually negative. At best the open information gives other groups the opportunity to debunk the lies and correct public knowledge, at worst people will ignore the facts for the opinions they prefer which is no worse than before the facts were available.

Comment: Re:systemd adds to and supports the old model (Score 3, Interesting) 810

by CRCulver (#47750863) Attached to: Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

I think the ado about systemd is more about Linux people who think that Linux should be hard to use except for a small elite and do not want the OS to be useful to less technically adept users.

If by "less technically adept users" you mean ordinary PC users who are being encouraged to adopt the Linux desktop, there is no reason that the init process has to be changed to woo them, because such users won't ever touch the system internals anyway, whether they be sysvinit or systemd.

If by "less technically adept users" you mean people with some command-line skills but who are not yet Unix wizards, well, arguably systemd makes things more difficult for them. One of the biggest reasons systemd adoption has pissed people off is that for the systemd devs, documentation is at best an afterthought. The API has changed significantly over the last couple of years, but most documentation one can find on the internet is now out of date, and it has not been replaced with docs for the current state of systemd. sysvinit, on the other hand, is extremely well documented from a number of sources, and the technology remains accessible to anyone with some bash skills.

Comment: Re:Hardwoods and a broom (Score 1) 336

by CRCulver (#47736527) Attached to: New EU Rules Will Limit Vacuum Cleaners To 1600W
If you like in a separate house, then maybe you can do fine without the carpet. In a block of flats, however, parquet floors make life hell for the people below (and, depending on noise conduction, even above) you. My winter heating bill also went down significantly after increasing the carpeting of my flat.

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