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Comment: jargon (Score 1) 83

What the hell is a "threat actor"?

Why use jargon when "criminal" is a perfectly good word? And if this is a specific type of criminal, say a terrorist or a thief or the intelligence apparatus of a foreign country, then there are very descriptive and precise words for those as well. If it's corporate espionage, then "crook" works well, too.

Why do people who use technology feel the need to create neologisms for the most mundane things? Just the other day, I saw someone from a news web site refer to an "article" as an "explainer cardstack". I'm not shitting you. I immediately took that news source out of my RSS feed because if they're that dedicated to lexical obfuscation, I don't trust anything they write.

English motherfucker. Do you speak it?

Comment: Re:Why are the number of cabs [artificially] limit (Score 1) 85

by drinkypoo (#47440129) Attached to: Lyft's New York Launch Halted By Restraining Order

Strictly speaking, I don't need a PC to stay alive and capable of working. That means the PC is a luxury; I have one because at some point of my life, I had spare income. That, in turn, is an inefficiency - I could had undercut other workers by asking for less.

Sure, if your only goal is efficiency. But if it is, you're boring.

Comment: Re:Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (Score 2) 153

by PopeRatzo (#47439493) Attached to: A Skeptical View of Israel's Iron Dome Rocket Defense System

No, in recent history, these conflicts are resolved by pressure from the international community. It's how apartheid in South Africa ended, to a great extent.

I don't know if you're old enough to remember Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher referring to Nelson Mandela as a "terrorist" and his party as a "terrorist organization". It turned out they were dead wrong. Last year, the philosophical progeny of Reagan and Thatcher hailed Mandela as a hero.

History is not going to be kind to the government of Israel in the first decades of the 21st century (if not longer).

It didn't have to be this way.

Comment: Re:Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (Score 1) 153

by PopeRatzo (#47439463) Attached to: A Skeptical View of Israel's Iron Dome Rocket Defense System

Did you read that Wikipedia article you linked to? It makes a pretty good case that it's apartheid:

The analogy has been used by scholars, United Nations investigators, human rights groups and critics of Israeli policy, some of which have also accused Israel of committing the crime of apartheid.[2][3] Critics of Israeli policy say that "a system of control" in the Israeli-occupied West Bank, including Jewish-only settlements, the ID system, separate roads for Israeli and Palestinian citizens, military checkpoints, discriminatory marriage law, the West Bank barrier, use of Palestinians as cheap labour, Palestinian West Bank enclaves, inequities in infrastructure, legal rights, and access to land and resources between Palestinians and Israeli residents in the Israeli-occupied territories resembles some aspects of the South African apartheid regime, and that elements of Israel's occupation constitute forms of colonialism and of apartheid, which are contrary to international law.[4] Some commentators extend the analogy, or accusation, to include Arab citizens of Israel, describing their citizenship status as second-class.[12]

You know the old expression about "looking like a duck and walking like a duck and sounding like a duck"? Well, Israel has been quacking for quite some time now when it comes to it's treatment of Palestinians.

Comment: Re:that's not the FAA's job (Score 1) 146

by drinkypoo (#47438015) Attached to: FAA Pressures Coldwell, Other Realtors To Stop Using Drone Footage

That means that if you want to shoot down low-flying Amazon delivery drones, you should be able to do that.

Well, no. Not unless you can account for ballistics, and the drop zone for your projectiles. But perhaps you should be permitted to use a tethered net launcher.

Likewise, if you want to fly your own drone to take pictures of your own property, you should be able to do that too as long as you stay below 1000ft.

Or any public property. Whether the restrictions on line-of-sight are reasonable is a whole other discussion (my thought is "maybe") but public lands belong to all of us. As always, the thing must be operated in a manner which does not represent a realistic risk to others.

Comment: Re:Wi-Fi Is Less Expensive (Score 1) 50

by roc97007 (#47437849) Attached to: FCC Approves Plan To Spend $5B Over Next Five Years On School Wi-Fi

wifi for a large population say 600+ for a high school is going to be far more costly than a structured cabling roll out which is only $25/30$ per port

Depends on the building. Consider that many schools were built long before anyone thought you'd need to run wires for some new purpose that nobody had thought of at the time of construction.

Comment: Re:Wi-Fi Is Less Expensive (Score 1) 50

by roc97007 (#47437829) Attached to: FCC Approves Plan To Spend $5B Over Next Five Years On School Wi-Fi

Not if you're installing the wiring in a school built in the 20's with masonry walls, no dropped ceilings, and flat arch clay tile floors.

Yes, exactly. Case in point, my daughter's arts and communications school (6 through 12) is a very old grade school (still has steam heat) that was repurposed as a charter school, and to wire the school for internet would require tearing so much down that it would have to be rebuilt anyway.

The thing about wifi is that it can be retrofitted with very little construction. In an older building, this matters.

Comment: Re:New York has commissions for everything (Score 1, Offtopic) 85

by drinkypoo (#47437233) Attached to: Lyft's New York Launch Halted By Restraining Order

ahhhh so *thats* why Texans are so fucking fat.

No. No it is not. It's because they have amazing food down there. In California, 9/10ths of all restaurants are total fucking shit food with total fucking shit service. I can outcook them any and every day of the week, and I do, and I have no formal training whatsoever. In Texas, 9/10ths of all restaurants are at least basically competent. I think it's because Texans will tell you just what they think of you, and all the incompetents have fled for California, or committed suicide.

It's also because it's stupid hot, and you can't go outside.

Put the two together and you have a lot of driving from restaurant to restaurant with precious little fat-burning in between. That's what happened to me, anyway. Gained 100 lbs in a year and a half. The weight's off now, but ugh.

If you couldn't step outside without tripping over a chicken fried steak, you'd be fat, too.

backups: always in season, never out of style.

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