Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re: Only for root users (Score 1) 107

by bill_mcgonigle (#48203915) Attached to: Windows 0-Day Exploited In Ongoing Attacks

If it's in-house software then it can be fixed - no excuses. If people don't fix problems they know about and can fix then they get what they deserve.

Show me somebody who has a huge investment into a physical machine controlled by some proprietary software where the vendor has gone out of business and there's no source available and then I'll have a bit of sympathy, but even then put it on a VM on its own VLAN - these are not extremely difficult problems.

Comment: Re: Nah, this is just stage 1 (Score 1) 306

by bill_mcgonigle (#48203267) Attached to: Hungary To Tax Internet Traffic

Solvent? There is nothing but IOU's in the "trust fund" - future taxation is the plan for paying out SS. Between that and Medicare for the boomers, each non-retiree (man , woman, and child) is on the hook for $900K in additional taxation over the boomers' retirement. Gene therapy will be banned and age wars seem possible. Arithmetic is inflexible that way.

http://www.npr.org/2011/08/06/...

Open Source

Ask Slashdot: Aging and Orphan Open Source Projects? 140

Posted by Soulskill
from the try-craigslist dept.
osage writes: Several colleagues and I have worked on an open source project for over 20 years under a corporate aegis. Though nothing like Apache, we have a sizable user community and the software is considered one of the de facto standards for what it does. The problem is that we have never been able to attract new, younger programmers, and members of the original set have been forced to find jobs elsewhere or are close to retirement. The corporation has no interest in supporting the software. Thus, in the near future, the project will lose its web site host and be devoid of its developers and maintainers. Our initial attempts to find someone to adopt the software haven't worked. We are looking for suggestions as to what course to pursue. We can't be the only open source project in this position.

Comment: Re:good (Score 1) 322

by Lord Kano (#48201263) Attached to: 3D-Printed Gun Earns Man Two Years In Japanese Prison

Obviously getting stabbed or strangled is just as bad as getting shot, but before somebody can stab or strangle you, they need to get up close first, and you can only get close to one person at the time.

Most of the people out there shooting people aren't exactly what you'd call marksmen. They're still getting pretty close most of the time.

And if that person happens to be bigger and stronger, there's no guarantee that it will even work. With a gun, against an unarmed opponent, it's a lot easier and quicker, even if the opponent is bigger and stronger.

That's precisely why guns are important. A 90 pound woman is not going to be able to fight off a 250 pound man with her bare hands. She'll be able to do it with a pistol.

LK

Comment: Re:good (Score 1) 322

by Lord Kano (#48201155) Attached to: 3D-Printed Gun Earns Man Two Years In Japanese Prison

Even if it comes to pass that metal 3D printers become cheap enough for people to start whipping up high quality guns at home, people will still be willing to pay for new and innovative products.

I suspect that you do not have much personal contact with the American gun culture. I am deeply immersed in it. I see guys selling their Third generation Glocks to buy Fourth generation versions of the same model.

Despite the fact that the 1911 is old and proven technology that nearly any manufacture can copy, people are will willing to pay more money for a Kimber because they make a really high end product.

If you're going to argue that eventually 3D printing will be able to produce pieces that are identical to those that can be made by high end manufacturers, how can any law be enforced against them? Once they're out of the printer, there's no way to tell where it came from.

LK

Things are not as simple as they seems at first. - Edward Thorp

Working...