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Comment: Re: Why do this in the first place? (Score 1) 88

MoFo is expert at making excuses for architectural deficiencies that slay the UX but have 15-year-old bugs on them because "that touches a lot of code". And fostering an environment where that's A-OK. In the time that Mozilla's not been able to get async tasks out of the UI thread, Elon Musk has build a spaceship company that's gone to the ISS and landed a rocket back to Earth. It's either a lack of engineering discipline or absurdist leadership - hard to say which or both but no for-profit firm would tolerate such complacence.

Comment: Re:How is this tech related? (Score 1) 154

by Moridineas (#49769721) Attached to: EU Drops Plans For Safer Pesticides After Pressure From US

Did you even read the _summary_?

"Just weeks before the regulations were dropped there had been a barrage of lobbying from big European firms such as Dupont, Bayer and BASF over EDCs. The chemical industry association Cefic warned that the endocrines issue 'could become an issue that impairs the forthcoming EU-US trade negotiations.'"

Comment: Re: did they damage the car? (Score 1) 432

by jackspenn (#49769175) Attached to: D.C. Police Detonate Man's 'Suspicious' Pressure Cooker

What if the reason he left the car there was he legally couldn't move it without a valid license?

Also not every cop is incompetent, but the overwhelming major are disconnected from the people they police, power tripping bullies, disgruntled revenue generators, slow thinkers (aka incompetent) or a combination of the above.

Comment: Re:How is this tech related? (Score 4, Insightful) 154

by Moridineas (#49768535) Attached to: EU Drops Plans For Safer Pesticides After Pressure From US

Yes, aggressive lobbying form 'Merican companies like Bayer AG (oddly headquartered in Leverkusen, Germany) and the largest chemical producer in the world, BASF (again, oddly headquartered in Ludwigshafen, Germany).

It's really nice that the political class of the EU can rely on the old "blame the US" trick to convince Europeans to ignore their own indebtedness to European corporate interests. Always shocking to me to see propaganda work so well and so easily.

Comment: Re:Not pressure from the US, but US Corporations (Score 3, Interesting) 154

by Moridineas (#49768445) Attached to: EU Drops Plans For Safer Pesticides After Pressure From US

Well, now it looks like US corporations are flexing their muscles in Europe, reducing democracy there after all but buying legislators here in the US.

I would quip that you should RTFA, but the relevant part is even quoted in the summary!

Just weeks before the regulations were dropped there had been a barrage of lobbying from big European firms such as Dupont, Bayer and BASF over EDCs. The chemical industry association Cefic warned that the endocrines issue “could become an issue that impairs the forthcoming EU-US trade negotiations”.

Dupont -- American
Bayer AG -- German
BASF -- German

Yes, American corporations pressured American politicians to pressure EU politicians. EU corporations were also pressuring EU politicians directly. EU politicians wussed out. This story is sensationalist because, of course, the EU politicians want to blame the US for their lack of spine and total subservience to corporations. Pot, meet kettle.

Comment: Re:The Sony connection (Score 2) 403

by Moridineas (#49765189) Attached to: What AI Experts Think About the Existential Risk of AI

It's also patently stupid to suggest that anything is "more vulnerable" now than it used to be. Things may be more interconnected, and are more likely to be attacked in the past, but they are not getting "more vulnerable" unless your management is A) not willing to spend the reasonable cost for appropriate security controls, or B) doesn't listen to their IT security staff when those systems start raising warning flags, or C) fails to hire competent security personnel in the first place.

I disagree strongly with this. Let's think about the case of industrial or governmental espionage. 50 years ago, saboteurs had to physically remove documents (or whatever they wanted) from the target. There were quite genius inventions--small (for the time) cameras, hidden canisters of films, briefcases with hidden compartments, etc., but ultimately there was a very physical component. Today it's possible to remotely infiltrate an organization and exfiltrate more "documents" than could previously have been removed in a lifetime, all with perfect fidelity.

A slightly more immediate example might be identity theft or credit card theft (as in your Target example). 30 years ago, did any company of any size have to worry about losing 50 million credit card numbers (or any similarly sized data set, for that matter!) in a data breach? 20 years ago? This is a new concern.

Comment: Re:It showed a lot (Score 1) 375

by bill_mcgonigle (#49747889) Attached to: What Was the Effect of Rand Paul's 10-Hour "Filibuster"?

Right - but you know who didn't show up? Bernie Sanders (S-VT). He claims to be a civil libertarian but couldn't bother to join the other Democrats who came to support the issue.

I think we know where his masters are on this issue - he's deep into the F-35 fighter jet fiasco; MIC is where his bread is buttered.

Comment: Re:Bring Back Background Play (Score 1) 60

Perhaps now they can bring back background play for mobile devices, so I don't have to stay on the youtube app to listen to music/podcasts/etc posted there.

This was the #1 most-requested feature on the YouTube app since it first appeared. Google *finally* released it - and it's the most expensive in-app purchase ever - you have to pay $120/yr to get it.

At the same time they changed the YouTube ToS to forbid third-party apps from providing the same functionality and aggressively started pursuing legal claims against the developers.

"Don't be Evil", 2015 skin.

Comment: Re: *Near* the south pole... (Score 1) 490

by bill_mcgonigle (#49740091) Attached to: The Brainteaser Elon Musk Asks New SpaceX Engineers

That's right. If the story is even true, the point is likely to see how you approach it, not if you get the exact distance right. If somebody grabbed paper and pencil to work out the math and I'd asked this question that would be a serious demerit - he didn't bother checking for requirements. That's the difference between being a competent thinker and a nerd - I don't suspect SpaceX runs on nerds.

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