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Comment Re:Population/Area has to be a factor (Score 1) 278

the San Francisco metro area (San Francisco–Oakland–Hayward, CA Metropolitan Statistical Area)

There's your problem right there. Most people that live in the SF Bay Area would include San Jose in that with more than 2m people. The US census for some weird reason divides the bay area into two pieces, San Jose and SF. No idea why and everyone here thinks that people who live in San Jose live in the "Bay Area" as do those that live in San Jose.

Comment Re:Scala (Score 1) 429

A few years ago I started using Scala and have even worked at shops where I convinced them to let me use it on larger scale telecom projects. There are things in Scala that can be terse and weird, but it's more than just a clean version of Java. If you learn all the tricks, it's got a lot of syntactic sugar and functional syntax that lend itself to shorter more manageable code. I'm still using it for some pretty big projects like

Although it's not just Scala, Groovy and Clojure are both languages that try to leverage the existing JVM and the rich base of Java libraries with a newer language.

Java was a big stepping stone during its time. It did a lot of things right, but the backwards comparability and keeping in horrible concepts (checked exceptions, no real properties, interfaces) has kept it from really growing as a language. I think the future of the JVM won't include as much Java.

A clean version of Java? More like a write-once language. Back in the the 80s when it was C (procedural) and LISP (functional) were the main languages. LISP lost due to its tendency to produce non-maintainable code bases that multiple programmers had a hard time working on together. Have fun learning that lesson again. Once was enough for me...

Comment Re:Avoid INTERCAL (Score 1) 429

SQL is similarly not obscure in its area, but worth learning and you rarely see it in a list of general programming languages (because it isn't). But the commercial vendors all ship their SQL with strong variants that extend the language and do more common language functions like looping. I speak of PL/SQL, TSQL, and their ilk, which all have a touch of obscurity in the same way R does.

SQL is not in any way obscure and is in fact the exact opposite of obscure. More programmers know SQL than any other language, Java is second.

You keep using that word....I do not think it means what you think it means....

Comment Re:couldn't hurt (Score 1) 264

The difference between hieroglyphics and Chinese characters (Korean just uses a syllabary as far as I know) is that while hieroglyphics were actually alphabetic in nature, hanzi/kanji are ideograms. So hieroglyphics are actually closer to the alphabets in use today.

The Korean alphabet (Hangul) is a probably the most efficient alphabet of any widely used (ie live) language in the world. The hieroglyphic nature of Chinese is what makes it so hard to read and write. Roman alphabets like we use in the west are more efficient as words can be sounded out in most cases due to our more consistent morphology (then again, we wouldn't have spelling bees if English had better morphology). But Hangul can be seen as a perfection of that idea but you could also consider it to be similar to a subset of IPA (international phonetic alphabet). Hangul's mapping to the sounds in the Korean language is much closer than the mappings in western and romance languages. It also has a very intuitive and efficient written representation combining consonants and vowels into one glyph in a regular way. This is partially due to the fact that Hangul is much younger and was developed specifically for Korean (unlike the alphabet English uses). You can learn Hangul in an afternoon and be able to (mostly) pronounce written Korean but not understand it. Spoken Korean is just as hard to learn as any other Asian language but the written form is a marvel of linguistics.

More info here:

Comment Re:it's an irish company (Score 1) 728

as german (and rest of the world) facebookers are concerned. therefore it should be no problem to hold them responsible under EU law. the thing is - if that was really a concern to germany, they would already have done it. looks more like lip-service to the israelis.

Only for tax purposes. The US holding Co holds all the IP and actual valuable stuff. The Irish sub just holds all the bank accounts.

Comment Re:The reason for these laws (Score 1) 728

There are Nazis and right wing extremists in every country. What distinguishes Germany is that they got into power in 1933. And they didn't get into power because Germany had too much free speech, they got into power because Germany culture is steeped in the worship of authority.

Maybe, but most historians blame the harsh terms after WWI and the destruction of the German economy in the 20s for the rise of the Nazi.

Comment Re: Germany wants a lot... (Score 1) 728

Define hate speech.

You worthless piece of shit should be send to the gas chamber.

Wow, the GP gave a list of grey areas and you posted some clear hate speech to try to refute him. The GP's point was that its hard to make these grey area determinations and doing so on an internet/country wide scale is practically impossible. Even harder to write code to do this instead of having an army of culturally sensitive SJW warriors making those determinations (which they would still mess up regularly). That whooshing sound was the GP's point going over your head.

Comment Re:Share Market =/ Economy (Score 1) 109

If your startup can't gain enough traction with a couple of 100k it was never going to happen for you you anyway.

Depends on the business you are in. If you are a mobile game startup, then 100k might be enough to see if the idea has legs. If you are an enterprise software platform startup, you need $50m to be competitive and even then you need better tech than your competitors with much deeper pockets. If you are starting a bank, even $50m might not be enough. If you are starting a restaurant, $500k or $1m might be a good amount to start with depending on your location and type of restaurant. But $100k is rarely enough to start more than a small 1 person shop which needs to be in a smallish niche to be successful.

Comment Re:wow, super insulting and prejudiced. (Score 1) 207

Though I should probably also mention that usability, by necessity, targets the broadest range of users. You've seem a lot of complaints about Ubuntu's UI, but it's about as simple as it can get. All the most common things are lined up neatly on the left.

No, that's not what usability is about. Usability is effectively and simply communicating a mental model to the user that enables them to feel "in-control" and allows them to do what they want in the way they expect. Different user environments have different usability requirements based upon frequency of use, average time of use and size and makeup of the expected user base.

Unity (and gtk3) removed a lot of useful functionality and is less stable than what it replaced and still hasn't caught up several years later. Those are real reasons to complain. My HCI prof founded that field with a study that proved that a specific known text interface was superior to a new GUI one for telephone operators. The reason for this was mostly a lack of keyboard shortcuts coupled with a known user-base that has a long average time of use, which is exactly what Ubuntu removed/changed and messed up with Unity.

Protip, if engineers can pick apart your UI design and your target market is engineers, you are doing it wrong...

Comment Re:Neo-Luddite scaremongering wins again (Score 1) 361

Make it cost $1 per pound less to make soy and farmers can sell soy for $1 per pound less and make exactly the same profit. This makes all your food cheaper by $1 per pound soy used. This means more poor people can eat, while more middle-class people have more money left in their pockets (residual wealth).

If only that were actually true. The problem is that in real life companies pocket that $1 (return part to investors, the rest to executive compensation). Only competition can correct that and it doesn't quite often in mature markets like oil and wheat.

Comment Re:Wait, what? (Score 1) 361

Aren't all crops genetically modified?

No, not by humans. By natural selection, yes, but that rarely would produce Antarctic teleost genes in vascular plants or other extreme HGT effects now "readily" possible.

Completely false. Almost everything we eat on a large scale we have transformed. Corn in its "natural" state only produces ears that are about 1.5" long (so they are about 12x their original size). Wheat, rye, and most of our livestock has undergone similar transformations. In the cases of the grains, its likely that it began as a "natural" process that humans observed and accelerated. There are entire books written on this topic alone and literally dozens of counterexamples to your claim and I know of no crop that humans haven't artificially modified through breeding, often for 100s or years or more.

You've been Berkeley'ed!