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Comment: Re:Easy fix (Score 3, Informative) 108

by _Sharp'r_ (#49565617) Attached to: The Engineer's Lament -- Prioritizing Car Safety Issues

Except of course, if you read the article (I know,must be new here) Ford actually _won_ the Pinto case and while they had previously (before the court case) agreed to install that plastic wall, the expert opinion was that it wouldn't actually accomplish anything and wouldn't have made any difference in the specific situation of the court case.

It's like saying horses should all be recalled because someone might fall off of them. Pintos were no more dangerous than other similar cars from all the other car companies. It's just how small, light cars were built in the days of high gas prices and associated regulations. Technology has advanced since then, but there are still trade-offs.

What most people "know" about Pintos is largely media-driven, not factual.

Comment: Re:Talk to us first if you wish to patent the chan (Score 1) 28

by Bruce Perens (#49565243) Attached to: Imagination To Release Open MIPS Design To Academia

OK. Can we see your agreements, please? Because that did sound very much like trolling for additional intellectual property to add to your portfolio.

People who read this article have pointed out three open CPU designs in addition to the one that I remembered.

While your product might be "production ready", please keep in mind that open projects are very often written to a higher standard than commercial ones, and the researchers involved are no less professional than your own developers. And their projects come with fewer intellectual property issues than yours.

Comment: Re:Talk to us first if you wish to patent the chan (Score 1) 28

by Bruce Perens (#49565025) Attached to: Imagination To Release Open MIPS Design To Academia

The patent terms are whatever they want them to be. In general "reasonable" and "patent" don't happen together much. And "tiny", well I really doubt it.

Having a company provide funds for a research grant and then reap the patent royalties isn't in general a good thing for society. The student researchers get paid like slave labor (if they get paid at all) and put what may be the best idea of their lives in some company's pockets.

Comment: Talk to us first if you wish to patent the changes (Score 1) 28

by Bruce Perens (#49564231) Attached to: Imagination To Release Open MIPS Design To Academia

It's very common these days for companies to allow universities to use their technology at the cost of tying the company into the university's patent revenue. And of course this is often publicly-funded research, so not only is the taxpayer paying for the development of patents used to sue that same taxpayer, the patents go directly to a company from academia.

The net effect is to feed intellectual property centered companies at the expense of the technology sector in general and small technology companies in particular.

Comment: Ungrounded Lightning (Rod) to Stop Using DietPepsi (Score 1) 507

by Ungrounded Lightning (#49564133) Attached to: Pepsi To Stop Using Aspartame

Aspartame has problems for some people (like my wife and brother-in-law) and not for others (like me).

Sucralose has problems for some people (like me) and not for others (like my wife).

Seems to me the thing for Pepsi to do is to bring out another formula - with a different name - using Sucralose, put them in the stores side-by-side (they get a LOT of shelf space to play with), and let the customers decide.

Changing the formula of an existing brand strikes me as a stupid move. I suspect Pepsi is about to have it's "New Coke!" moment...

Comment: problems with making stuff invisible to drivers (Score 1) 95

The bit you're apparently not grasping is something called a spatial light modulator. ... Couple it with a microwave radar or ultrasound sonar, and you can track individual raindrops and then cast shadows on them.

Then construct an object that appears to the system to be raindrops and you can put an invisible obstacle in the road. B-b

Comment: Don't forget legacy BROWSERS. (Score 4, Insightful) 143

by Ungrounded Lightning (#49563663) Attached to: JavaScript Devs: Is It Still Worth Learning jQuery?

A site may wish to continue using JQuery because some of its clients are using older browsers that don't support the new features that allegedly obsolete JQuery code.

Drop the JQuery code and you drop those customers. Develop future code without it and the pages with the new features won't perform with people using legacy browsers. And so on.

I've seen similar things happen over several generations of web technology. Use care, grasshopper!

"Joy is wealth and love is the legal tender of the soul." -- Robert G. Ingersoll

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