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Comment Re:What's the point? (Score 1) 80

Why would someone eat something that contains almost no nourishment

To enjoy the pleasure of food without contributing as much to obesity? cf. the entire diet-foods industry.

That said, I've had some of these yam-like noodle products, and the ones I got tasted like hell and digested even worse. Hopefully a large dose of cellulose can fix that. I'd love to have some chee cheong fun with the majority of calories coming from the sauce and meats!

You need either carbs or fat just to survive.

Or protein.

Comment Re:Disposable screens for disposable products? (Score 1) 94

Your old OLED screens don't compare to modern OLED displays - they're at least two generations behind. And black bars? That's the controller, not the 'phosphors'. It could be that a certain OLED panel had a bad production run, but try to keep proper separation of concerns.

A 4-year-old GS3 AMOLED screen looks great compared to any iPhone screen produced today, and the newer ones are even better (I considered switching to a 'better' phone (circuit-board level) after running a GS4 for years, and just couldn't go back to LED). Apple is switching to better technology obviously (and good for them).

Most importantly, the iPhone OLED screen will last longer than security updates will be available for the device. Be a responsible netizen and recycle the thing in 2023. Or go with an open product instead to extend the safe lifetime of your purchase.

Comment Re:No sympathy for the black cabs (Score 2) 103

Hell, try getting a cab to Waterloo or London Bridge (two of London's biggest rail stations, both of them just south of the Thames) during the rush hour. I've been refused multiple times on both of those, because the driver didn't want the hassle of the traffic over the bridges. This is despite the fact that the conditions under which they are granted their monopoly on the pick-up trade stipulate that a taxi driver must:

- Accept any hiring up to 12 miles or up to one hour duration, if the destination is in Greater London
- Accept any hiring up to 20 miles if starting at Heathrow Airport

I don't like Uber's business model of "break the local laws until Government gives in and changes them", but the black cabs were a monopoly in need of breaking.

Comment Re:Holy crap ... (Score 1) 66

The security difference between chip-and-signature and chip-and-PIN matters in only one case, and that is if your physical card is stolen from your wallet. Skimmers, data breaches, shoulder-surfing, all the hacking attacks won't yield the secret key inside the chip, preventing it from being counterfeited. If you don't like the security of your chip-and-signature card because you're afraid your card might be stolen, ask your bank to issue you a chip-and-PIN card instead. If your bank won't, there are plenty of other banks who will, and who will be grateful for your business.

Visa and the retailers originally figured U.S. customers would prefer chip-and-signature because it makes selling things "easy". But that's a pretty stupid attitude, because lots of people (including you and me) are wary about identity theft. Customers need to complain to their banks so that they learn we'd rather have PINs than signatures.

Overall credit card security will still remain terrible for a long time to come because static mag stripes still exist, and online card-not-present transactions still use static authentication data like CVV2 codes. What really needs to happen to actually improve security is that mag stripes and static numbers like CVV2 need to be flat-out outlawed. The recent "liability shift" is the opening salvo in the conversion, but we're probably still a decade away from actual security.

Comment Re:I'll believe it when I see it (Score 1) 50

And yet for all your misdirected Windows whining DirectX for Windows is the only area that AMD cards perform well. Their Linux drivers blow, as noted by other posts here, and that is because AMD can't write OpenGL drivers to save their life.

nVidia, on the other hand, has extremely fast and solid drivers for Linux.

Comment Well of course, because Linux is OpenGL (Score 1) 50

And AMD can't handle OpenGL. I don't know why, I'm not sure what's so hard, I'm not sure if there's a monster that guards the OpenGL specs in the AMD office or something, but they have sucked at GL for over a decade, and show no signs of getting any better. They can't claim it is because of an API limitation either. For whatever you want to say about the mess that is OpenGL, nVidia makes their GL drivers dead even with their DX drivers. You can use either rendering path and can't tell the difference in features or speed.

That is also why I'm real skeptical that Vulkan is going to do anything for AMD. While they are heavily involved in the development, they are involved with OpenGL's development too (ATi was a voting member on the ARB and is a promoter with Khronos Group). Given that Vulkan is heavily GL based, originally being named glNext, I worry that AMD will suck at performance with it as well.

Comment I'll believe it when I see it (Score 2, Insightful) 50

Not the driver, that's out, but that they are going to change how they do drivers. They've said that numerous times before, and always the situation is the same. They are very slow at getting actual release drivers out (they are forever beta versions) and their OpenGL performance and support is garbage (to the point that HFSS would fail to run on systems with AMD cards).

So AMD: Less talk, more good drivers. I want to support you, I really do, but I've been burned too many times.

Comment And what does that cost for gigabit routing? (Score 1) 110

The problem PFSense has as compared to consumer routers is that running on normal Intel CPUs it needs more CPU power (and thus cost) to be able to forward a given amount of traffic. Plus all the NICs and such are separate silicon. Boradcom makes little all-in-one chips that have a couple of ARM cores that have acceleration for routing and so on. Also they have things like an ethernet switch and ethernet PHYs on the chip so they needn't be added. Have a look at a BCM4709A for an example that is popular in routers.

PFSense is good but it is not the most economical thing if you are talking features matching a consumer router, meaning gig routing, multiple ports, and wifi, you can have your costs go up a fair bit. Particularly if you also then want it to be fairly small and low power. If you hop over to PFSense's site it would cost about $575 for a SG-2440 with WiFi which would give features roughly on par with a consumer router.

While I'd much rather have that over a consumer router, a consumer router is in fact what I have because I didn't want to spend a ton of money for a home router.

Comment Re:required reading (Score 1) 214

So what do the higher classes read if not BLD?

There are plenty of other newspapers in Germany, Die Zeit, Die Welt, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung being some that come to mind immediately, than plenty of other regional and topical newspapers like Hamburger Abendblatt, Süddeutsche Zeitung, Handelsblatt, die tageszeitung and many, many more.

Comment Re:Works for me (Score 1) 136

Manufacturers have long made custom versions of products for specific store chains, and not just TV sets. Pots and pans, clothing, furniture, most products are available to any store that's willing to pay for them. Some stores (like Walmart) have a specific price point, so the manufacturers produce a model without the chrome-plated knobs, the low contrast screens, and use only the cheapest cloned capacitors and dubious quality power supplies.

There's a lot of marketing power in it, too. Not only do they get to offer big TVs for ridiculously low prices, it's also safe to tout benefits like a "150% price match guarantee", when they have the exclusive contract to sell that exact model.

Comment Re:What's Unusual? (Score 1) 91

This new piece of malware shows sophistication of design, but that's not unheard of. Older malware was often customized by compile time switches and definitions; this just abstracts some of that away.

Many people (i.e. journalists and managers) think of malware authors as pimple-faced script kiddies hacking in their mothers' basements. They think that large, well-designed projects require teams of skilled developers who would only do so for a fat paycheck.

What's happened now is that vulnerabilities are so profitable that the threat landscape is no longer the exclusive domain of the single hacker - criminal gangs want a piece of it. They can afford to pay team salaries to engineer a solution.

And malware authors have learned to avoid the biggest risks of getting caught. In the old days a virus writer would also be the distributor. Modern authors get paid by selling their exploit code, along with customization and support contracts, to gangs of attackers. The attackers take on the risks, the developers collect fat checks. In some cases of vertical attacks (ATM skimmers for example), the "owner" of the malware uses cryptography to encrypt the skimmed data, preventing the low-level attackers from profiting from the stolen data. The profits go to the top first, and the paychecks cascade down (assuming honor among thieves.)

So what's newsworthy here is that they believe this malware to be further evidence of a new breed of well organized criminal software developers.

You cannot have a science without measurement. -- R. W. Hamming