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Comment: Re:Fine. Legislate for externalities. (Score 1) 415

by Trailer Trash (#48026497) Attached to: Energy Utilities Trying To Stifle Growth of Solar Power

Nobody is quashing an emerging industry. What they're saying is that they don't want to have to buy electricity from everybody.

What they are saying is that they want to keep generating dirty, polluting electricity because it is profitable and easy for them. Unfortunately that has costs for society and the rest of the economy, so we are going to have to transition away from it.

They might be using nuclear in which case it's not dirty or polluting. The bottom line is that they're in the business of generating electricity in a certain way, it's pretty normal for them to keep doing what they're doing.

You might not like it. Fine. Get some folks together and build a solar energy electricity provider and sell to the grid. Others are doing it.

But don't act like existing utilities need to knock down their profitable coal plants just because you happen to not like them (even though you likely still use just as much electricity as anybody else).

Comment: How much money does Brown get from police unions? (Score 4, Insightful) 86

I love this part, too:

"It includes exceptions for emergency situations, search-and-rescue efforts, traffic first responders, and inspection of wildfires. It allows other public agencies to use drones for other purposes — just not law enforcement."

First off, everything's an "emergency situation" now that we have a war on terror and a war on drugs. Second, this let's the use the old "inspection" ruse to use the drone as long as they can get some inspector to tag along.

I would recommend you all remember this when it's time to vote. Make stuff like this a big deal. Call them to the carpet at town hall meetings. Etc.

Comment: Re:good (Score 1) 377

by jeremyp (#48026059) Attached to: Google To Require As Many As 20 of Its Apps Preinstalled On Android Devices

Well Kitkat is apparently making good inroads as it went from 13.6% in June to 24.5% [android.com] in early September

iOS 8 was at 46 percent after four days. Obviously, since Apple control all the hardware, it's much easier for them to get people to upgrade, but it's still a big problem for the Android ecosystem. Presumably, app developers are having to support fairly ancient versions of the operating system in order to reach a sizeable proportion of the market, whereas an iOS developer can reach 95% of the installed base with an iOS7+ app.

Comment: Re:Swift is MIA in TFA (Score 1) 67

by jeremyp (#48025915) Attached to: Building Apps In Swift With Storyboards

It's actually the second article in a series. The first article looks like it had some Swift in it.

No doubt there will be a new Slashdot story for each subsequent article. Because Swift.

Development novices who were hoping that Apple had created a way to build complex apps with a limited amount of actual coding might have to spend a bit more time learning the basics before embarking on the big project of their dreams.

Is anybody at all surprised except, maybe, said novices?

Comment: Re:Fine. Legislate for externalities. (Score 2, Insightful) 415

by Trailer Trash (#48024351) Attached to: Energy Utilities Trying To Stifle Growth of Solar Power

This. I have no problem at all if they want to split my bill into two parts, a fixed cost for just being hooked up and an incremental cost for generating the electricity I consume, as long as the two costs are calculated sanely. The proper fix is to adjust the tariffs to reflect the growing reality of universal connection without universal consumption.

That's what my electric utility already does. I do have a slight problem with this:

"But you shouldn't quash an entire emerging industry just to protect an old and established one."

Nobody is quashing an emerging industry. What they're saying is that they don't want to have to buy electricity from everybody.

Forcing them to buy electricity was a bone thrown to the solar energy, as are the various tax incentives for installing solar. I actually want to install solar myself, badly, but I would prefer this to proceed with the least government interference.

Comment: Re:Rent a Tesla for $1 (Score 1) 331

by Trailer Trash (#48023291) Attached to: State of Iowa Tells Tesla To Cancel Its Scheduled Test Drives

The fact that they are willing to spend a lot of money on attorney fees to challenge the laws probably means there is some other reason they don't want to do that. That's the question people should be asking.

It's called "principle", something that's uncommon in the left-wing world.

Comment: Re:Rent a Tesla for $1 (Score 1) 331

by Trailer Trash (#48018597) Attached to: State of Iowa Tells Tesla To Cancel Its Scheduled Test Drives

But again, why is it only automobile franchises that are the problem and not all fast food and retail franchises that are anti-competitive?

You have no idea what you're talking about. McDonald's can own stores and franchise the brand at the same time - nobody cares. I have no problem with auto dealers - the issue is that if Tesla wants to sell directly then they should be able to. The only reason to disallow it is to limit competition for entrenched players.

By the way, thanks for playing the part described above. If not you, somebody else would have. But you folks are always good for a laugh.

Comment: Re:~/.cshrc (Score 1) 208

by jeremyp (#48018279) Attached to: Apple Yet To Push Patch For "Shellshock" Bug

You're probably not running a bash that isn't vulnerable. Neither of the first two patches completely fixed the issue. Personally, I don't think it'll be completely fixed until somebody patches bash to not interpret any of its environment variables as functions.

Which it should never have done in the first place.

Comment: Re:Really? (Score 1) 488

by Reziac (#48014191) Attached to: Utilities Should Worry; Rooftop Solar Could Soon Cut Their Profit

As it was explained to me by the engineering dept. at SoCalEdison, the more power I use, the more it costs them, so they'd rather I used less, and if I used none at all that would be perfect.

Incidentally Sam's Club has started putting little wind generators on the lampposts in their parking lots. Manager at the one I frequented in SoCal told me this had already dropped their power bill by 5%, which is significant if you're in retail (even bulk-wholesale-priced retail).

Comment: Re:C=128 (Score 1) 165

by jeremyp (#48013401) Attached to: Why the Z-80's Data Pins Are Scrambled

In later models, i.e. well after the 6502 was obsolete for general purpose computers, there was an 8 register that you could set to change which page was regarded as zero page. If that had been available from the start, it would have saved me a lot of time looking for locations that didn't zap the MS Basic interpreter on our Commodore PET. I seem to remember that the floating point accumulators were considered the best bet.

Comment: Re:6502 to Z80 work per clock ratio (Score 1) 165

by jeremyp (#48013389) Attached to: Why the Z-80's Data Pins Are Scrambled

The 6502 had special addressing modes for accessing the bottom 256 bytes of memory. Addresses in both the 6502 and Z80 were 16 bit, thus taking two read cycles to get a whole address into the CPU so that you could then get the content at the address. However, with the 6502, "zero page" addresses could be read in one read cycle. Not only that, but pairs of zero page locations could be used for indirect addressing. They could be treated as a set of (slow) address registers.

When I first came actress the Z80 after having programmed the 6502 for a while (as a hobbyist), I was quite shocked at how all over the place its design appeared to be and I actually found it a little harder to program at first because there was more to learn in order to use the CPU effectively.

The Force is what holds everything together. It has its dark side, and it has its light side. It's sort of like cosmic duct tape.

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