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Comment: Re:The problem (Score 1) 194

by jeremyp (#49111263) Attached to: The Imitation Game Fails Test of Inspiring the Next Turings

Furthermore the Americans solved the 4-rotor problem (even harder), something the British were not able to do.

That's bullshit. The British knew exactly how to crack the four rotor problem: they needed bigger and faster bombes, but they didn't have the resources with which to build them. In fact, by using some tricks, they were able to have some success with the existing equipment, but a permanent solution was only arrived at when the USA joined the war. An agreement was reached to share cryptanalysis efforts and the Americans with their enormous resources and significant design input from the British were able to build the required bombes.

Comment: Re:Forced benevolence is not freedom (Score 1) 551

by jeremyp (#49018739) Attached to: RMS Objects To Support For LLVM's Debugger In GNU Emacs's Gud.el

Actually, in your scenario, the source code does not lose its "freedom", but the derivative work never gets it. This means that the changes never get back to the community, but the original code is there as fee as ever.

It's important to note that I can take a piece of GPL software and modify it and still not give the changes back to the community. In fact, even if I distribute my modified software, I only have to give the changes to whomever I distribute it to. Of course, I can't then stop them from giving it away to anybody who asks.

Comment: Re:Capable, sure (Score 4, Insightful) 329

That is because the terrorism was not religiously motivated. Religion had a polarizing effect on the population of Northern Ireland, but the motivation for the terrorism was political, not religions: it was the Irish Republican Army, not the Irish Catholic Army.

Comment: Re:How Writers Expressed Emotions (Score 1) 104

by jeremyp (#48796565) Attached to: Chrome For OS X Catches Up With Safari's Emoji Support

Well most writers were always unable to convey the tone of their writing. Generally speaking, most of us only read the best writing from ages ago. Back in the 20th century, pretty much everything I read was written by people I knew personally or people who were good enough writers to get published in books and newspapers and magazines.

Now, Twitter is spammed relentlessly by the illiterate arseholes who were always there but couldn't get published in the past.

Comment: Re: Shrug (Score 2) 161

by jeremyp (#48775153) Attached to: HTTP/2 - the IETF Is Phoning It In

This is utter nonsense. XHTML is not a an HTML renderer, it is a standard for an XML document format.

If your browser misrenders an HTML4 document because it thinks it is XHTML, the problem is either the browser itself which can't distinguish different document types or the person who wrote the web page and erroneously put the xml processing instruction at the top.

Comment: Re:Modern Technology (Score 4, Interesting) 189

by jeremyp (#48767011) Attached to: UK Government Department Still Runs VME Operating System Installed In 1974

Without knowing *why* the castle is gone, I have no idea what your point is.

Usually, if it was a stone castle, the building materials were robbed out to make new dwellings. The reason that people could do that is because the owners abandoned them as being shit places to live.

With buildings, as with other man made items, technology moves on. Generally speaking, a house built now will be more comfortable, easier to heat and more suited to modern life styles than a house built 50 years ago. Who cares if the old ones fall down? If you are going to knock it down and replace it with something better, money spent making it last a millennium is wasted money.

If it's not in the computer, it doesn't exist.

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