Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Still not good enough. (Score 1) 239

by Tablizer (#48933633) Attached to: FCC Officially Approves Change In the Definition of Broadband

history has shown over and over and over again that big government is very bad.

Too much of anything is bad. Some water is good for you, too much and you drown. Some big company influence is good for us; but too much and we get corporate fascism and/or corporate communism (which may degenerate to regular communism).

The slippery-slope fallacy can be used to justify any position.

Overly-influential banks already had a big hand in crashing the world economy recently and almost got us into another Great Depression. (True, gov't mistakes contributed to it, but run-away greed was the main cause.) I thank Big Gov't for having prevented another Great Depression...in this case.

Comment: Re:Still not good enough. (Score 1) 239

by Tablizer (#48933477) Attached to: FCC Officially Approves Change In the Definition of Broadband

What conservatives often fail to grasp is that "less government" and "more competition" are sometimes at odds. We need referees to enforce a competitive environment. It's too easy for big co's to buy away competition. We want them using their resources to make better & cheaper mousetraps, not to keep out other mousetrap makers.

Comment: Re:That doesn't sound bad (Score 1) 239

by Tablizer (#48933325) Attached to: FCC Officially Approves Change In the Definition of Broadband

So 87% of Americans have Microsoft Access. Thanks for clearing that up :-)

Technically 100% of Americans have potential broadband access; it would just cost an arm and leg to get it in many places. For example, a billionaire may have high-speed satellite connections if their mansion is in a remote area. Having access is not a "Boolean value".

If one wants a practical formal definition of "having access to broadband", then one may have to apply a price threshold.

Comment: Re:Still not good enough. (Score 5, Interesting) 239

by Tablizer (#48933187) Attached to: FCC Officially Approves Change In the Definition of Broadband

It is true those countries are more compact, making economies of scale easier, BUT even well-populated areas of the US still have limited, unreliable, and gimmick-heavy choices. I'm one. Thus, population density is not the full reason. We are doing something wrong in the US.

It looks and smells like oligopoly-based crony-capitalism controlling the strings, but you are welcome to present alternative explanations.

Comment: Get off my organic green carpet! (Score 1) 236

by Tablizer (#48932101) Attached to: One In Five Developers Now Works On IoT Projects

They changed "mainframe" and "server hosting" into "cloud", "client/server" into "rich client", "statistics" into "data mining" and "big data", the original Mac look into "Shading-free GUI's" or the "flat look", and "embedded" into "Internet of things". It's not the new technology I have trouble keeping up with, but rather the new names for old shit.

Next you know the young whipper-snappers will take "variables" and call them "dynamic constants" and rave about the New Way of Programming.

Comment: Re:Saturn pulling Jupiter (Score 1) 46

by Tablizer (#48928161) Attached to: We May Have Jupiter To Thank For the Nitrogen In Earth's Atmosphere

The total angular momentum of all solar system objects remain the same, correct? So if we ignore those flung out of the solar system for now (assuming it's not a signif. factor), if Jupiter increases its angular momentum (moves "outward"), then a good many objects will lose angular momentum to counter. Where did it go? Do many "long orbit" objects that once had a semi-circular orbits now have highly elliptical orbits (as many comets do)?

"Free markets select for winning solutions." -- Eric S. Raymond

Working...