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Comment: Re:Well, duh (Score 1) 209

Stasis would only be necessary for the purposes of reducing energy consumption and preventing boredom, which would both be issues in a machine intelligence.

When can we get that? I'm bored now - speaking as an intelligent (biological) machine (my predilection for posting on /. not withstanding...)

Comment: Re:This is worse than mythology. (Score 1) 203

Evolution doesn't kill anything. Sometimes the environment kills things, sometimes they reach the full expression of their complexity without being killed. Evolution is when the environment kills and diversity is reduced, and the herd now again consists of those whose nature is capable of full expression in the environment.

Ever heard of Gnosticism? They preached that this world was inherently evil, and that when humanity went extinct, we'd all be resurrected in a much nicer world, and therefore, breeding was an evil act.

Not too many Gnostics around. See how that works?

Comment: Re:Simple answer... (Score 1) 410

by Em Adespoton (#48635701) Attached to: Colorado Sued By Neighboring States Over Legal Pot

Actually, what they need to do is mandate all substances at a federal level, rather than state level, because any difference in policies between adjoining states will always carry this problem, so there's nothing special about marijuana in this regard... unless, of course, they want to institute state border checks similar to what they already have in place between the US and Canada.

What you're speaking of is not a federated republic; the United *States* would have to change its name, as making substance intake a federal issue removes significant power of statehood.

Of course, the DEA and Congress are already at the state level, which means they're already mandating all substances at a federal level -- they just (wisely) aren't enforcing these mandates when individual states choose to ignore them.

Comment: Re:On paper, sure. But in reality the DEA makes la (Score 1) 410

by Em Adespoton (#48635667) Attached to: Colorado Sued By Neighboring States Over Legal Pot

(of course, I can't think of why the DEA would be better equipped than the FDA to make emergency decisions)..

I can think of just one: LEOs see a bunch of people lurching around and groaning "braains!" after ingesting some new chemical compound.

The truth is that policy should belong to the FDA, but LEOs are first responders, and should have some say in correlations. Most of this should be data fed back to the FDA to help them make their decisions, but there are some remote possibilities where this process may take longer than quat is required to prevent actual harm to society.

Stretching the argument I know, but it's still a reason.

Comment: Re:Hope it works better then my wallet (Score 1) 109

by fahrbot-bot (#48634979) Attached to: RFID-Blocking Blazer and Jeans Could Stop Wireless Identity Theft

The VISA Pay Wave doesn't have user challenge/response, it's simply a wireless magstripe.

Do you have a citation for that?

Sure, every TV commercial showing someone using Pay Wave - tap, (beep/flash), done. In addition, it's advertised as being faster than just swiping. Having to type in a PIN isn't faster. The US is supposed to move to Chip and PIN next year for CC - I think debit cards usually need a PIN already (not sure, I would *never* use a debit card). Often no signature/PIN is required for common purchases (like food) if under $50 - both CC and debit.

Comment: Re:Hope it works better then my wallet (Score 1) 109

by fahrbot-bot (#48631095) Attached to: RFID-Blocking Blazer and Jeans Could Stop Wireless Identity Theft

Yes, wireless connections to the card are a risk ... but that risk is minuscule in comparison to the risks associated with using the magstripe (vulnerable to skimming) instead of the chip (uses challenge and response). These days, if someone requires me to use magstripe, I look at the terminal extremely carefully before swiping.

The VISA Pay Wave doesn't have user challenge/response, it's simply a wireless magstripe. It's just a gimmick and really no faster than swiping the card. Skimming at a POS terminal - other than at a gas station or older ATM - is pretty rare (and/or ballsy) and I've personally never heard/read about it anywhere. I live in the US, so your mileage may vary elsewhere...

Comment: Re: Stupid (Score 1) 382

by ShieldW0lf (#48630949) Attached to: Google Proposes To Warn People About Non-SSL Web Sites

You cling desperately to your stupid "I'm thinking of a number" straw man because you know that I'm right. Everything that hasn't been confirmed not to be a threat is a threat. You secure your turf, survey it regularly, and build a wall in the hopes it will be good enough to deal with the threat of the unknown.

You know this, of course. Children could figure this out. You're taking this position because you seek to work against the interest of your neighbour and you don't want the task to become more difficult.

You're selfish, and it's as plain as day for all to see.

Comment: Re:Stupid (Score 1) 382

by ShieldW0lf (#48630441) Attached to: Google Proposes To Warn People About Non-SSL Web Sites

Now you're just being stupid.

Dictionary: Adj: Secret: kept from the knowledge of any but the initiated or privileged

If you have a secret that you share with just a few and keep the rest of us in the dark, that is a conspiracy, and conspiracies are a threat to peoples freedom.

Is it a number? Is it a plan to seize control over the water supply? I don't know, but you've expended extraordinary effort to keep me from knowing what it is, which means I can't assure myself that I'm secure and further implies to me that if I knew what you were doing I'd be motivated to put a stop to it.

Your secrets keep me from having access to concrete facts, and that is the reason that they represent a threat.

Now, fuck off, coward.

Comment: video demo? (Score 2) 63

by v1 (#48630031) Attached to: Ars Reviews Skype Translator

how can you possibly not link to an a/v demo or review of this, in the thread OR in the review???

I went looking on youtube and found a metric crapton of copies of the MS demo. I don't want to watch the publisher's demo, of course it's going to be flawless. (and quite possibly rigged) They've successfully flooded the actual honest review demos into oblivion on youtube. Anyone got a link to a review with A/V test?

Comment: Re:It's not stupid (Score 1) 382

by ShieldW0lf (#48629881) Attached to: Google Proposes To Warn People About Non-SSL Web Sites

Great illustration.

On my desktop, over the LAN, with caching forcibly disabled, HTTP took 5.3 seconds and was 9% slower than HTTPS.

On my mobile, over WiFi, again, with caching forcibly disabled, HTTP took 6.8 seconds and HTTPS took 10.8 seconds, 33% slower, AND instead of consumed 2 MB of data because caching couldn't be used.

On my mobile, over the cellular network, HTTP took 18 seconds, and HTTPS took 30 seconds, 69% slower, AND consumed 2 MB of data.

So, considering that mobile is huge and growing, THIS IS A DUMB IDEA.

Comment: Re:Stupid (Score 1) 382

by ShieldW0lf (#48629461) Attached to: Google Proposes To Warn People About Non-SSL Web Sites

Freedom does not require you to operate in secret. If you feel the need to operate in secret, either you need to fix your culture, or you need to fix yourself.

Preventing misrepresentation is a social positive. Preserving secrecy is a social negative. Compromises have to be made, but protecting your secrets is not a noble goal in and of itself, shouldn't be necessary in a free society, and in fact represents a threat to other peoples freedom.

Chemist who falls in acid is absorbed in work.

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